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You have to use the drop down on the 2025R (as well as other models) where you can select the years. The new 2025R uses the 120R.
Well if it is really the same loader on both machines and the pressures are identical (2500 PSI seems to be pretty standard), then the only explanation I can think of is that the lift capacity is derated on the smaller tractor for safety reasons?

Al
 

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Doesn't the 1025r and 2025r use the same 120 loader.:dunno:
The loader operator's manual is your friend:

[h=3]Approved Tractors—120R Loader[/h]Consult a John Deere dealer for the most up-to-date tractor and loader compatibilities.
Tractor Model Series
2R
1R
1E
2025R
1025R
1023E
2026R
1026R
 

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Tractordata.com says the 2025 uses H130.

Al
Right... kudos once again to JD for assigning the same model number to two tractors that have no similarities. :)

The Gen-1 2025R could use the H130, the Gen-2 2025R cannot.
 

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Doesn't the 1025r and 2025r use the same 120 loader.:dunno:
Despite that they are speced for different capacities based on the tractor they’re mounted to-partly due to the size of the machine, the pressure, weight, etc between the two machines they’re mounted on.
 
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Despite that they are speced for different capacities based on the tractor they’re mounted to-partly due to the size of the machine, the pressure, weight, etc between the two machines they’re mounted on.
Yes you are correct...I was responding to AL's explanation of different loader geometry and cylinder size when in fact the loader is the same on both machines. :bigthumb:
 
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Discussion Starter #26
Check the illustrations I posted above. JD Parts clearly shows it bolted to the rear of the transaxle. What exactly are you trying to accomplish?
Yes, thanks to your drawings I learned it wasn't on the motor.:bigthumb:
 

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I just bought a 2025r hydro pump and I'm going to put it on my 1025R and see if it's more responsive. According to what I could find with some internet sleuthing, the 2025R pump should put out a little over 1GPM more at 3200 RPMs. We'll see if that's noticeable on the loader and/or backhoe.
 

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'20 1025R, 120R, 54D
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I just bought a 2025r hydro pump and I'm going to put it on my 1025R and see if it's more responsive. According to what I could find with some internet sleuthing, the 2025R pump should put out a little over 1GPM more at 3200 RPMs. We'll see if that's noticeable on the loader and/or backhoe.
Interested to see how this turns out...
 

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Hmmmmmm.........:unsure: :unsure: :unsure:
 

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So what's the final conclusion here?
 

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I suspect that I'm going to put it on and not be able to notice a difference, but I just gotta know!

Just to give some background for those who want to follow along, here's what I've done so far.

  • Since the 1025R pump says HEMA in large letters, I started searching to see if I could find a site. I found this one Hema Hindistan
  • After looking closely at the 1025R pump to see what markings I could find that might match something on the site, I found 1PN.082 stamped in the bottom.
  • Well lookie there, I found a 1PN-082 here: 1PN Series
  • That confirms, based on how HEMA labels them, that the pump displacement is 8.2ccs (or .5 cubic inches according to the google converter)
  • I used this site's PumpOutputFlow calculator to find that at 3200rpms, it puts out 6.93 gpm (Hydraulic Pump Calculations - Womack Machine Supply Company) That's not exactly what tractordata.com shows, but it passes the sniff test. There's not a good way to know what RPM the stated volume was calculated at or whether there is any gear reduction within the system, so close enough.
  • I was looking at the pump on ebay and the seller confirmed that the punched model in that pump was 1PN.098, or 9.8cc or .6 cubic inches. That's not on the site, but no reason to believe it doesn't follow the same framework.
  • Using the same calculator above, 9.8cc displacement shows to pump 8.31 gpm
  • Also, as a sanity check, I used another calculator on that same page to confirm that it would take a little over 20hp to pump 8.31gpm to 3500psi.
  • I also looked at jdparts.com at the pumps for the 1025r and the 2025r. The gaskets, suction tube, and I think maybe one other part were identical part numbers, but the pumps were different part numbers as stated on here before. That confirms for me that it will fit, but we'll really confirm when I get the pump in the mail.

The big question for me, and I think someone brought it up on this thread or a similar one, is whether there is a restriction somewhere in the system - cooler, lines, etc. that will stymie my ability to get more flow. I've been researching a bit on how much flow a 1/4 line will support, but I can't seem to get a good answer. I'm sure it's because it's a "it depends" scenario that based on elbows and total length, but I'm just curious if the loader cycle time will be the same no matter what pump you have as long as it goes to at least 3 gpm.

The other question I have, and it's possibly answered somewhere but I haven't found it yet, is why/how the implement and steering flows are different when you have just 1 pump. If you have two separate pumps, I get that, but if you only have 1 and you're not moving, why would 6 gpm not all go to an implement. Is there a restriction in the manifold or somewhere? If anyone has seen this answered, or knows, I'm all ears.
 

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The pump arrived today. After checking the code, I'm pretty sure it's a 1PN-090 and not a 1PN-098. That means than rather than pumping 1.24 more gpms, it will pump .69 more gpms. This makes it even less likely that I'll see a difference in cycle time. Definite bummer.




771161
 

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You won't know until you try. Thanks for reporting back. And did you notice that the part numbers relate to the gpm directly. 090 - 9gpm, 098 - 9.8gpm
 

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You won't know until you try. Thanks for reporting back. And did you notice that the part numbers relate to the gpm directly. 090 - 9gpm, 098 - 9.8gpm
Based on my research, the 090 is cubic centimeters and not gpms.
 

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I suspect that I'm going to put it on and not be able to notice a difference, but I just gotta know!

Just to give some background for those who want to follow along, here's what I've done so far.

  • Since the 1025R pump says HEMA in large letters, I started searching to see if I could find a site. I found this one Hema Hindistan
  • After looking closely at the 1025R pump to see what markings I could find that might match something on the site, I found 1PN.082 stamped in the bottom.
  • Well lookie there, I found a 1PN-082 here: 1PN Series
  • That confirms, based on how HEMA labels them, that the pump displacement is 8.2ccs (or .5 cubic inches according to the google converter)
  • I used this site's PumpOutputFlow calculator to find that at 3200rpms, it puts out 6.93 gpm (Hydraulic Pump Calculations - Womack Machine Supply Company) That's not exactly what tractordata.com shows, but it passes the sniff test. There's not a good way to know what RPM the stated volume was calculated at or whether there is any gear reduction within the system, so close enough.
  • I was looking at the pump on ebay and the seller confirmed that the punched model in that pump was 1PN.098, or 9.8cc or .6 cubic inches. That's not on the site, but no reason to believe it doesn't follow the same framework.
  • Using the same calculator above, 9.8cc displacement shows to pump 8.31 gpm
  • Also, as a sanity check, I used another calculator on that same page to confirm that it would take a little over 20hp to pump 8.31gpm to 3500psi.
  • I also looked at jdparts.com at the pumps for the 1025r and the 2025r. The gaskets, suction tube, and I think maybe one other part were identical part numbers, but the pumps were different part numbers as stated on here before. That confirms for me that it will fit, but we'll really confirm when I get the pump in the mail.

The big question for me, and I think someone brought it up on this thread or a similar one, is whether there is a restriction somewhere in the system - cooler, lines, etc. that will stymie my ability to get more flow. I've been researching a bit on how much flow a 1/4 line will support, but I can't seem to get a good answer. I'm sure it's because it's a "it depends" scenario that based on elbows and total length, but I'm just curious if the loader cycle time will be the same no matter what pump you have as long as it goes to at least 3 gpm.

The other question I have, and it's possibly answered somewhere but I haven't found it yet, is why/how the implement and steering flows are different when you have just 1 pump. If you have two separate pumps, I get that, but if you only have 1 and you're not moving, why would 6 gpm not all go to an implement. Is there a restriction in the manifold or somewhere? If anyone has seen this answered, or knows, I'm all ears.
Since it seems the pump is made in Indiyeah you might have a look see and check into whether another brand of tractor might use their larger pumps that can/could fit.
 

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Here are the results! One callout, I don't consider the swing numbers accurate. The cylinder is cushioned and on that particular function, it has what I will call a double stop. It was very hard to make my brain hit the button at the exact right time. As I was doing the tests, it was very clear just how unscientific this test was. I did my best to keep it as consistent as possible, but I'm sure the numbers are +/- at least 250 milliseconds if not 500. That said, I feel confident in saying it's faster after feeling it and seeing the numbers. Should you upgrade your 1025R pump to a 2025R pump...probably not unless, your pump goes out. In that case, why not, but otherwise, I don't think I would.

If you throw out the swing numbers, the average speed increase was 8.75%. Based on the pump calculations, the increase in pump volume was 9%. It's interesting that it's that close, but I doubt you can extrapolate that to say that if you increase the pump volume by 25%, you would see a 25% increase in speed.

Changing the pump was very easy. I'm a fairly skilled shade tree mechanic, but I've never done it professionally. It took me about 20 minutes to change it out. I didn't replace the gasket, I used the one that was there. Someone with less tools and skills should allow an hour, but anyone could do this that's ever turned a wrench.

I'm currently trying to track down this same model pump from the manufacturer. I'm not that familiar hydraulic gear pumps, but I'm hoping I can find the same housing with a higher displacement and retrofit it to the tractor.

If anyone needs a 1025R pump with 66 hours on it, ping me and we'll make a deal :)

771245
 
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