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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Those of you that have added hydraulic tilt to the 3 point on your 1025R:
  • Did you add a cylinder on both sides, or just one side?
  • If you had it to do all over again, would you change anything?
  • What is the maximum and minimum length of your hydraulic link(s)?
  • Is there anything that I need to watch out for?
It seems like a simple process if I just take the manual adjustable link to the local shop and have them make an equivalent hydraulic link. But, if I also replace the fixed link, it seems like I could introduce some kind of problem that could break something.
 

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The only reason to do both would be if you want to move both all the way up to increase the lift height. This is the same reason many people put an adjustable link on both sides... you can crank both all the way up and get some additional inches of lift. You could do the same with hydraulics, but would take two different valves to allow you to do that and also allow you to tilt. If you're just trying to get tilt, I can't think of any rear implement that would benefit from the crazy high angle you could attaint by putting one side down and one side up. I think this would actually get really frustrating since the two cylinders one a single valve will never move evenly.

I suggest that you put the hydraulic tilt on one side, and the old adjustable link on the other side. Then you can actually crank both all the way up if you need the height, or leave the manual link in the middle for normal operation.
 

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Fit Rite Hydraulics
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Those of you that have added hydraulic tilt to the 3 point on your 1025R:
  • Did you add a cylinder on both sides, or just one side?
  • If you had it to do all over again, would you change anything?
  • What is the maximum and minimum length of your hydraulic link(s)?
  • Is there anything that I need to watch out for?
It seems like a simple process if I just take the manual adjustable link to the local shop and have them make an equivalent hydraulic link. But, if I also replace the fixed link, it seems like I could introduce some kind of problem that could break something.
I doubt that you will find a single hydraulic side link that provides an equal amount of tilt to both sides other than from me, Fit Rite Hydraulics.
When built properly, there is no "good" reason to have 2 hydraulic side links on a tractor of this size.
 

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^^ Ya you'd have to find a tilt cylinder that is just the right length so that when it is half way extended, it is equal to the length of other link, whether it is a fixed or adjustable one set for middle. Might be hard to track down to fit properly on the limited category one we have. The fit Rite one is known to be excellent. If we had a normal category one, it would be a readily available anywhere and pretty standard.
 

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I thought the goal was to use a cylinder that was the length of the adjustable link when retracted to make return to level easy.
The one my dealer installed retracts a little too far so I am researching clamp on stoppers to do this.


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A key thing is to decide what you want to do with your 3 point implements (assume you've already thought this through, but posting for anyone else reading this thread). This is the second tractor I've had with top and tilt, but my previous tractor had a top cylinder only. That met most of my needs. Tilt is useful -- for example -- for grading road ditches for drainage or fine-tuning the crown of a dirt or gravel road. But a top cylinder alone seems indispensable to me if you have a bunch of rear implements (especially for flail and rotary mowers and tillers).
 
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I thought the goal was to use a cylinder that was the length of the adjustable link when retracted to make return to level easy.
The one my dealer installed retracts a little too far so I am researching clamp on stoppers to do this.


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That depends if you want to be able to tilt it the other way or not.
I had mine built so I could tilt it both ways, which means level is about halfway through the stroke. Others choose to have theirs built so level is fully retracted.
I attached a bubble level made for campers, to my box blade so I can see when I'm level.
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
That depends if you want to be able to tilt it the other way or not.
I had mine built so I could tilt it both ways, which means level is about halfway through the stroke. Others choose to have theirs built so level is fully retracted.
I attached a bubble level made for campers, to my box blade so I can see when I'm level.
Yes - this is what I had in mind, being able to tilt the other way rather than turning the tractor around.
 

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Fit Rite Hydraulics
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I thought the goal was to use a cylinder that was the length of the adjustable link when retracted to make return to level easy.
The one my dealer installed retracts a little too far so I am researching clamp on stoppers to do this.


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So what will you do if-when you need to tilt to the opposite side? :unsure: Yes it is easier to fully retract and know that the implement is "level" side-side for transport.

But then what do you do when you need to angle the opposite way? There are times when you can't just turn the tractor around and it is most definitely an inconvenience to have to turn the tractor around even if the situation allows for it. :(

People think that they want everything based on the tractor when in my experience when grading it has nothing to do with the tractor, but the ground that you are on. Meaning you have to look at the ground anyway, it serves no purpose to have it lined up with the tractor when it always needs to be adjusted to meet the adjustment requirements of the ground that you are on. ;)

The ideal hydraulic side link simply mimics the factory adjustable unit. This cannot always be done, that is why it should be built to match the mid adjustment point. On most of the JD tractors, this can be achieved when built properly. The hydraulic unit gets built to where the rod is extended half way and matches the same adjustment of the manual adjustable link at the mid point adjustment length. :cool:

That way you have roughly the same capabilities that the stock tractor has. (y)

Just my experience building these units for 18hp garden tractors to articulated AG tractors.
 
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