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So, I bought this older dump truck for the farm. 1989 International 7.3L Navistar diesel non-turbo S1600 with a 16' dump bed. It is in need of some work but for the price I did not mind buying it. I am in the process of replacing the bed with 1/4" steel plating and replacing the ribs under the plates. While i had the bed up yesterday I took a look at the hydro fluid in the PTO driven Hydro pump. It was a milky color, obviously in need of a change. So what type of hydro oil would be good to use for a replacement. I was looking at the Traveler ISO 32 or 46 oil at TSC. Any thoughts on what to use, or is the Traveler oil just as good? Thanks.....
 

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So, I bought this older dump truck for the farm. 1989 International 7.3L Navistar diesel non-turbo S1600 with a 16' dump bed. It is in need of some work but for the price I did not mind buying it. I am in the process of replacing the bed with 1/4" steel plating and replacing the ribs under the plates. While i had the bed up yesterday I took a look at the hydro fluid in the PTO driven Hydro pump. It was a milky color, obviously in need of a change. So what type of hydro oil would be good to use for a replacement. I was looking at the Traveler ISO 32 or 46 oil at TSC. Any thoughts on what to use, or is the Traveler oil just as good? Thanks.....

ew, no don't buy the traveler. That stuff is awful. I would use john deere standard hy-guard (the JDM J20 C high-vis fluid)

Since it has water in it, run a couple gallons of cheap ATF through it and then flush that and replace with JD hyguard.
 

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and :ttiwwp:
 

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ew, no don't buy the traveler. That stuff is awful. I would use john deere standard hy-guard (the JDM J20 C high-vis fluid)

Since it has water in it, run a couple gallons of cheap ATF through it and then flush that and replace with JD hyguard.
It's a farm truck. Not an everyday user. But if that is what the consensus says then i would do it. Couple things I need to do first is repair the radiator, guy ran a backhoe into it. Last week I went to start it up and would not start. Ended up replacing the fuel shutoff solenoid. So now that it is running I can work on the bed replacement. I only need to replace half of the bed. The guy had a chemical tank on the back half of the truck, which rotted the back half of the bed out. Once I get that replaced and the radiator fixed I will start using it. But I figured I would do some maintenance on it while doing this. I need to do some fiberglass repair to the front. so it is a work in progress.
 

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:munch:
 

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Hmmm, panhandle...Oklahoma or Florida? Really no difference though, both a warm climate. I'd start with John's recommendation and flush the system with a cheap oil to get the water out. Since you're in a warm climate and your truck is approaching 30 years, I'd use an ISO 46 oil. Probably half the price of HyGuard and available at almost any auto parts store. I've never looked at the specs for HyGuard, but after using/pouring it, I'd say it's closer to an ISO 32...thicker oil means fewer leaks on the older truck. Bob
 

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Hmmm, panhandle...Oklahoma or Florida? Really no difference though, both a warm climate. I'd start with John's recommendation and flush the system with a cheap oil to get the water out. Since you're in a warm climate and your truck is approaching 30 years, I'd use an ISO 46 oil. Probably half the price of HyGuard and available at almost any auto parts store. I've never looked at the specs for HyGuard, but after using/pouring it, I'd say it's closer to an ISO 32...thicker oil means fewer leaks on the older truck. Bob
Is that for the low-vis or high-viscosity hy-guard?
 

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Lo-vis is all I use...so it's lo-vis! Bob
 

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For a dump truck, I’d have no problem useing the Traveler or whatever Walmart sells, especially if you need to do a few flushes to clean things out.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
For a dump truck, I’d have no problem useing the Traveler or whatever Walmart sells, especially if you need to do a few flushes to clean things out.
Thanks ken! Yeah it appears that a few flushes are in order from what I am seeing. i will know more Friday when I look deeper into it. I have been doing some research on these PTO pumps and appreantly they are not very suffisicated pumps and tollerances are not that close (Gear driven pupmps) like these new tractors. These type of pumps are considered variable dutiy not like the tractors which is continuous duty. As long as I get ISO 46 with Wear inhibitor and non foaming oil I should be good to go. Thanks to those that have given advice, I did take into consideration everyone that gave input. I just cannot justify the cost of JD fluid in a pump that does not have the operatioanal factors as the tractors. Now if this had been my tractor I would be making a trip to the JD Dealer.
 

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Right. This is a simple gear pump, not a sophisticated hydrostatic transmission.
 

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Right. This is a simple gear pump, not a sophisticated hydrostatic transmission.
Agreed. Nothing crazy. If it’s hydraulic oil, you’ll be fine.
 

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BillieS, Don't get too carried away with multiple flushes. Many hydraulic oils are designed/formulated to "accept" water...the oil molecules encapsulate the water molecules and prevent the water from coming in contact with the metal parts and creating corrosion. When you do your first drain, catch the oil in a (relatively) clean container. The first 2 or maybe 3 gallons are the most critical, but watch the oil as it drains to see if it changes appearance. Transfer the oil to a clear container and let it sit for about 2 or 3 days and then observe the "liquid".

If you have a clear liquid on the bottom of the container, that's water and multiple flushes may (???) be necessary. If you have a milky liquid on the bottom with an oil colored liquid above that, the bottom layer is "water encapsulated oil", the top layer is clean/good oil and there's an excellent chance you got 99.9% of the water out of the system with the initial draining.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
BillieS, Don't get too carried away with multiple flushes. Many hydraulic oils are designed/formulated to "accept" water...the oil molecules encapsulate the water molecules and prevent the water from coming in contact with the metal parts and creating corrosion. When you do your first drain, catch the oil in a (relatively) clean container. The first 2 or maybe 3 gallons are the most critical, but watch the oil as it drains to see if it changes appearance. Transfer the oil to a clear container and let it sit for about 2 or 3 days and then observe the "liquid".

If you have a clear liquid on the bottom of the container, that's water and multiple flushes may (???) be necessary. If you have a milky liquid on the bottom with an oil colored liquid above that, the bottom layer is "water encapsulated oil", the top layer is clean/good oil and there's an excellent chance you got 99.9% of the water out of the system with the initial draining.
Understood. This dump has over 100,000 miles on it. I figure that most likley it has the factory oil in it that came with the dump. So I am not taking anything into consideration. Just dump what ever is in it, flush refill then I know what I have going forward. Las thing I want is 5 - 6 ton on it and it will not dump. That would just piss me off and make me wander if I should have done a full flush.
 

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The other "thing" is I've got to assume it's a single acting cylinder...hyd pressure raises it, gravity lowers it. If at all possible, drain your oil with the dump body lowered, then there's no residual oil in the cylinder. You probably knew that, but sometimes we get carried away and forget the obvious! Just a casual reminder. Bob
 

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Discussion Starter #17
The other "thing" is I've got to assume it's a single acting cylinder...hyd pressure raises it, gravity lowers it. If at all possible, drain your oil with the dump body lowered, then there's no residual oil in the cylinder. You probably knew that, but sometimes we get carried away and forget the obvious! Just a casual reminder. Bob
Actually I was thinking abou that today. I will inspect the tank and see of there is a drain plug and drain it when the bed is down. But I also want to insure that I can fill it when lowered. If not I will prop it up with the safety bar and take the cylinder hose off and drain it also. Then perform a bleed of some sort to get it raised enough to get the safety bar out of the way. The rest will take care of itself. I hope...:dunno:
 
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