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Me and a couple of neighbors were talking about our tractors​. Mine 4066R,one neighbor 4044R, other neighbor 5075M. We got to talking about the key for ignition if they would start each other tractor? Well I took my key out of my tractor and I unlocked the 4044R cab and started the tractor up. I went over to the 5075M unlocked the cab door and started it. So I take it that JD uses same key and ignition switch for the 4000&5000 series tractors​? So how does one secure your tractor?? If anyone else has a key to these series of tractors they could start your tractor up and drive off. Not good. My neighbors keys​ did unlocked my cab door and started my tractor. Makes a person think.
 

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Me and a couple of neighbors were talking about our tractors​. Mine 4066R,one neighbor 4044R, other neighbor 5075M. We got to talking about the key for ignition if they would start each other tractor? Well I took my key out of my tractor and I unlocked the 4044R cab and started the tractor up. I went over to the 5075M unlocked the cab door and started it. So I take it that JD uses same key and ignition switch for the 4000&5000 series tractors​? So how does one secure your tractor?? If anyone else has a key to these series of tractors they could start your tractor up and drive off. Not good. My neighbors keys​ did unlocked my cab door and started my tractor. Makes a person think.
Your key will likely start various types of JD equipment other than just 4 and 5 series tractors. I suppose JD believes if people can cough up the money needed to buy the machines they can afford the insurance necessary to cover the theft so you can turn around and buy another machine from them.
 

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1025R, '30 Ford, '08 Range Rover Supercharged, '63 MGB, '92 300ZX twin turbo, '73 Courier 2.3 turbo
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Keys don't equal security

Your key will likely start various types of JD equipment other than just 4 and 5 series tractors. I suppose JD believes if people can cough up the money needed to buy the machines they can afford the insurance necessary to cover the theft so you can turn around and buy another machine from them.
Cessna and Piper aircraft keys are too commonly the same, too. JD keys won't fit the planes, but half the tractors around here have interchangeable keys:quiet:
 

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Hi All
The use of the same key is quite common, All 1025r and 1023e and probably 1026r use the same key as my old 102 ride on mower. Massey Ferguson used the same key through from the Grey (TE series ) through the MF35 to the MF135 and many other models.
If someone want to steal a JD they can walk into the dealers and buy a new key over the counter.:banghead: I bought a replacement key today.
Regards John
 

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I think my 1 series tractor key would start an 8 series tractor.
 

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Not just Deere

Cat also shares the same key up and down the line from a skid steer to a large excavator. Most of the newer stuff has electronic locks so even if you get in the cab you can't start it without knowing the code. LOL, lots of time the code is written down in the cab so that's not very safe either.

Treefarmer
 

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This is very normal (as already stated) across most brands of equipment. Heck you can even go on eBay and buy "master key sets" like these:

Site Master Pro 21 Key Set Fits Bobcat Case Cat John Deere JLG Komatsu Volvo | eBay



John Deere does sell a replacement handle kit for your machine with dedicated key, or you could check with a locksmith to change yours, but if a thief really wants it...this won't stop them either.
 

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Heh. I learned about the keys about 2 weeks into owning 2032R. I had been parking mine behind my garage initially and taking the keys into the house to "secure" it.

But my snowplow wasn't delivered with the tractor so the dealer had to send someone out 2 weeks later to install it. I didn't even realize her was here. I walked out the side door to go get the mail and there he was. The tech had my tractor in the middle of the driveway and was 90% done installing the plow setup. Hey, how'd you get the tractor out here? Then he explained the key thing.

The techs only carry 2 keys with them when they go out. One for the riding mowers and one for tractors.
 

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My Grandfather used to say that locks were for keeping the honest people out. Thieves will always find a way.......:banghead:
 

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You can buy spare keys at Lowes and Home Depot. Makes a person think
 

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Cat also shares the same key up and down the line from a skid steer to a large excavator. Most of the newer stuff has electronic locks so even if you get in the cab you can't start it without knowing the code. LOL, lots of time the code is written down in the cab so that's not very safe either.

Treefarmer
Same thing with computers. At the bike shop the owner had them modified that we had to put in a password before anything could be done. Entering it 1,000 a day in front of customers and other employees is not safe in my book. Most of them had to be so long and complicated you had no choice but to write them down. Each site requires a different one. Then you would show up to work and couldn't log/punch in no matter what code you used. Then his IT guy would have to show up to reset everything. So you would end up with a new list of passwords written on a piece of paper.
I told him all that security is made worthless by sliding that piece of paper under the keyboard. lol
 

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Years ago the local Case IH dealer had several compact tractors stolen one night, IIRC 6 or 8 tractors. They stole them out of the yard and never broke into the building. Cops asked the dealer if the keys had been left in them, he said no, but all they needed was one key since they all used the same one.

Sounds like nothing has changed since.
 

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The only reason why I take the key out of my tractor now is to deter curious kids in the neighborhood from getting hurt if they were to start it up. My tractor is usually parked outside under cover. My garden tractor is in a small shed and has never had the key out unless I left it outside while I went in for lunch. My shed has a lock on the hasp, but it is never locked.:laugh:

I found out about the common key thing at my dealer. I saw a young kid going around starting a few tractors and shutting them down. He didn't drive them, just started them for a few seconds. I notified the staff and found out he was a local kid who hung around the dealership a lot and somehow got hold of 1 key. That key fit most of the tractors on their lot.

Thieves will get anything if they want it enough, but I also don't want to make anything too easy and inviting to steal.

An old friend of mine used to keep his car key in the ignition and the doors unlocked. He said that if someone took it for a joyride ... so be it, at least it wouldn't be returned (if he got it back) with a window broken and the steering column torn apart. I grew up in NYC and never understood that philosophy :dunno: I had a fairly new car stolen, and it wasn't for a joyride, so my cars are always locked.:nunu:

Just my 2 cents.
 

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This goes for Craftman lawn and garden tractors, I had 2 one from 94-95 and the other from 2010 and they both used the same keys. :dunno: I am not sure if the Tecktite cab on mine has universal keys or not. I just park it and take the key out.
 

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The only reason why I take the key out of my tractor now is to deter curious kids in the neighborhood from getting hurt if they were to start it up. My tractor is usually parked outside under cover. My garden tractor is in a small shed and has never had the key out unless I left it outside while I went in for lunch. My shed has a lock on the hasp, but it is never locked.:laugh:

I found out about the common key thing at my dealer. I saw a young kid going around starting a few tractors and shutting them down. He didn't drive them, just started them for a few seconds. I notified the staff and found out he was a local kid who hung around the dealership a lot and somehow got hold of 1 key. That key fit most of the tractors on their lot.

Thieves will get anything if they want it enough, but I also don't want to make anything too easy and inviting to steal.

An old friend of mine used to keep his car key in the ignition and the doors unlocked. He said that if someone took it for a joyride ... so be it, at least it wouldn't be returned (if he got it back) with a window broken and the steering column torn apart. I grew up in NYC and never understood that philosophy :dunno: I had a fairly new car stolen, and it wasn't for a joyride, so my cars are always locked.:nunu:

Just my 2 cents.

Removing the key is a good plan. It's what I did when working for the trailer hood. This way no kid can just start it up and take off with it. It covers your butt liability wise. The "parents" that refuse to watch them would surely take me to court if anything happened to the little angels. Even had them jump in front of my moving tractor. It's like the birth givers send them out to get hurt. Then tell them to just make sure it is someone else's fault.
 

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Tractors aren't the only things that have this issue with keys.

There are about 20 keys that you can have that will open an entire fleet of tractor trailer power units. Each manufacture has just a small number of keys and they just rotate them through the assembly line.

Automotive keys have the same issue but people just don't try it very often. Most modern automotive keys have a chip built into them to code the key to the ECU. If you buy an off the shelf key and have it cut for your modern car and don't pair or doesn't have a chip the car will start then shut off after a few seconds. They will still open a door but not run the car.

For the math nerds:
If a tumbler mechanism has 5 tumblers each with 5 positions that match the key, there are only 120 possible combinations for a key to match the lock. The number one seller of US cars in 2016 was the Ford F series at 820,799 units. Given a 5 tumbler mech you have a 98.6% chance of having a key that will fit another tumbler in the F series vehicles (that is just in the 2016 F series alone).

I'll bet that if one were to research the tumblers that were used they probably fit multiple years and multiple vehicle chassis as well. So for fun, grab your car key and try it in a friends vehicle. On modern cars it may unlock and start the car but the transponder will prevent the ECU from allowing the car to run.

If you are interested here is an article about automotive keys.
Guide for Transponder Keys
 

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Tractors aren't the only things that have this issue with keys.

There are about 20 keys that you can have that will open an entire fleet of tractor trailer power units. Each manufacture has just a small number of keys and they just rotate them through the assembly line.

Automotive keys have the same issue but people just don't try it very often. Most modern automotive keys have a chip built into them to code the key to the ECU. If you buy an off the shelf key and have it cut for your modern car and don't pair or doesn't have a chip the car will start then shut off after a few seconds. They will still open a door but not run the car.

For the math nerds:
If a tumbler mechanism has 5 tumblers each with 5 positions that match the key, there are only 120 possible combinations for a key to match the lock. The number one seller of US cars in 2016 was the Ford F series at 820,799 units. Given a 5 tumbler mech you have a 98.6% chance of having a key that will fit another tumbler in the F series vehicles (that is just in the 2016 F series alone).

I'll bet that if one were to research the tumblers that were used they probably fit multiple years and multiple vehicle chassis as well. So for fun, grab your car key and try it in a friends vehicle. On modern cars it may unlock and start the car but the transponder will prevent the ECU from allowing the car to run.

If you are interested here is an article about automotive keys.
Guide for Transponder Keys
Reminds me of a good one. Back in 1993 friend & I went out to the diner after the bar. We met up with some girls from the bar. I was driving my new Dodge W250 Cummins truck. They were in a new Shadow or Sundance car. We got out to the lot first. For some reason I put my key in her car. Worked like a charm. Then I drove it around to the back of the diner. (My friends idea) When they came out she obviously seen the car missing. She asked where is the car? I said probably got stolen. She went nuts. lol I told her right away about what we did. So all was soon forgiven. Then she wanted to try her key in my truck. For some strange reason it didn't work.
 

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A buddy of mine and his brother both had '78 Ford Broncos (a long ago buddy!). Found out by accident that the keys were interchangeable.
 
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