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Discussion Starter #1
This may sound dumb, but I replace my fuel filter on my 1025R.
The tractor was always started easy and ran well.

When I replace the fuel filter I turn the key and let the fuel fill up the filter and the glow plug went out. The tractor started and stalled. Then I restarted it and it ran just like it always did, fine.

Now hear the problem. Every time I start the tractor it starts and stalls and runs well on the second start.
I can't see were I or what I did wrong on replacing the fuel filter. I only use John Deere parts.

The tractor is one year old and 100 hours. It was just a maintained I do on all my vehicles every year.
 

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I'm glad you asked this question as I'm about to change the filters on my 1026R as well. According to the owners manual, you followed the correct procedure post filter change by priming the fuel system. The fuel system is supposed to be self bleeding, but I believe I've heard this is not always the case? Let's see what the experienced folks have to say. My guess is you still have air in the fuel lines somewhere. On older machines you would have to crack a fuel line to bleed out the air so perhaps that may need to take place, but let's see what others that have done this have to say.


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Bleeding the injectors shouldn't be needed if the engine has run. I suspect you have an air leak on your filter which allows a bit of air in the system when it's shuts down for a period of time. Recheck your filter for good connections. If it was your separator, make sure it's seated correctly and is tight.
 

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Bleeding the injectors shouldn't be needed if the engine has run. I suspect you have an air leak on your filter which allows a bit of air in the system when it's shuts down for a period of time. Recheck your filter for good connections. If it was your separator, make sure it's seated correctly and is tight.
^^^^ this!
 

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Mine did that but when I started it the second time I opened it to WOT and let it run that way for 10 seconds or so and idled down, shut it off and re-started. Everything was fine, never happened after that. Now I never started it a 3rd time to see if it would stall before doing what I did so I can't say that this will solve anything. It's just what I did. It might not have stalled on the 3rd try, I don't know. :unknown:
 

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Two dumb thoughts. Does the fuel filter/ water separator had a fuel shut off on it that was not turned on? Did you do the filter under the floor board and if so did you put the new in the correct way?


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Bleeding the injectors shouldn't be needed if the engine has run. I suspect you have an air leak on your filter which allows a bit of air in the system when it's shuts down for a period of time. Recheck your filter for good connections. If it was your separator, make sure it's seated correctly and is tight.
I would think if there was an air leak , when he turns on the key and the fuel pump comes on he would see a fuel leak some place before starting the engine, because you are pressurizing the system.
 

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Nice thing about Diesel is that you can very easily smell a fuel leak if for some reason it's difficult to see visually. Maybe start sniffing around? :)


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I would think if there was an air leak , when he turns on the key and the fuel pump comes on he would see a fuel leak some place before starting the engine, because you are pressurizing the system.
Even though that's what common sense would tell you, it's not always the case. I've seen/had this happen on several vehicles, boats, and tractors. I have an older 12 valve Cummins B5.9 that is kinda known for doing just this. Under a vacuum or lack of pressure, a crack in a rubber fuel line opens up, lets air in and fuel runs back to the tank. Under pressure the fuel lines are fine. Makes it difficult to start, but it runs fine once started. No fuel leaks. Many of the bigger ag tractors also suffer from the same problems. Old rubber fuel lines can do this. So can an improperly seated filter or gasket. It may act just like a check valve.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks guys. I will run the tractor longer and at a higher RPM to see what happens.
When I went to the JD dealer and ask for the fuel filter. They gave me one. The one that go's in the clear glass looking tube with a spring and red rubber O ring at the bottom of the glass.
There are no leaks, no smell, and runs well after the second start. I can't restart the tractor until Friday night or Sunday. I will let you know what happens.

I did turn off the fuel petcock when I replace the filter and turn it back on when I was done. I did wait until the fuel glass was full before starting.

I think running the engine at a higher RPM will do the trick.
 

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Thanks guys. I will run the tractor longer and at a higher RPM to see what happens.
When I went to the JD dealer and ask for the fuel filter. They gave me one. The one that go's in the clear glass looking tube with a spring and red rubber O ring at the bottom of the glass.
There are no leaks, no smell, and runs well after the second start. I can't restart the tractor until Friday night or Sunday. I will let you know what happens.

I did turn off the fuel petcock when I replace the filter and turn it back on when I was done. I did wait until the fuel glass was full before starting.

I think running the engine at a higher RPM will do the trick.
My guess would also be to run the engine at high RPM for a time..... might just be not totally self-bled of air just yet. I would start with that also.
 

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Even though that's what common sense would tell you, it's not always the case. I've seen/had this happen on several vehicles, boats, and tractors. I have an older 12 valve Cummins B5.9 that is kinda known for doing just this. Under a vacuum or lack of pressure, a crack in a rubber fuel line opens up, lets air in and fuel runs back to the tank. Under pressure the fuel lines are fine. Makes it difficult to start, but it runs fine once started. No fuel leaks. Many of the bigger ag tractors also suffer from the same problems. Old rubber fuel lines can do this. So can an improperly seated filter or gasket. It may act just like a check valve.
Happened to to stop at our local Mid States John Deere Dealer this afternoon and ask about this, the service manager has a difference in oppinion with above , with the newer injection systems and fuel pumps, the service techs. and manager said in most instances you will see leak if you have a bad hose connection,or air leak. Issue is probabably not caused from sucking air.
 

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Happened to to stop at our local Mid States John Deere Dealer this afternoon and ask about this, the service manager has a difference in oppinion with above , with the newer injection systems and fuel pumps, the service techs. and manager said in most instances you will see leak if you have a bad hose connection,or air leak. Issue is probabably not caused from sucking air.
I agree in most cases you'll see a leak, but every once in a while an oddball comes along.

Did they offer any input on what the problem might be?
 

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Run her pretty good and see if maybe there is an Embolism not caught by the Self-bled system. Try this first rather than jump to the obscure suggestions first. KISS method usually solves most issues.
 

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There is one other thing I thought of. Did you push the filter up tight before you put the glass in place? Don't know if this would matter on the running part but if you put the filter in the glass and then put the glass on, the filter isn't seated right. Just a thought. While we're on filters I'd like to ask a question. Has anybody flipped the fuel line coming out of the tank putting the in-line filter, the one under the left foot so that the in-line filter is closer to the pump and in the engine bay making it easier to change and keeping it warmer in the winter? I've thought about doing this but don't know if it would be a wise move.
 

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Just remembered , just a few weeks before trading tractors this summer, had the same thing to happen. Replaced both filters same day, filled the filter, started and ran rough for a few seconds then OK. A couple of days later would not start ,,cranked and cranked then it started. Dealer picked up the tractor told him ,they checked it out could find no problem seemed OK after the 3 or 4th time of starting.
 

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There is one other thing I thought of. Did you push the filter up tight before you put the glass in place? Don't know if this would matter on the running part but if you put the filter in the glass and then put the glass on, the filter isn't seated right. Just a thought. While we're on filters I'd like to ask a question. Has anybody flipped the fuel line coming out of the tank putting the in-line filter, the one under the left foot so that the in-line filter is closer to the pump and in the engine bay making it easier to change and keeping it warmer in the winter? I've thought about doing this but don't know if it would be a wise move.
Actually, I think this filter is positioned under the floorboard so it is at the lowest point in the fuel line, and able to catch and hold crud better this way.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Ok I had time today to run my tractor. I ran it for about 10 minuet's running a round the property. Turn the tractor off and restated it. It was OK. I let it sit for one half hour and went back and restarted it. OK.
I then left for a few hours and re started the tractor 6 hours later.
It started just fine and ran like it always did..
So if you replace your fuel filter. You must run the tractor for a few minuets or longer to remover the air in the lines.
 

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Actually, I think this filter is positioned under the floorboard so it is at the lowest point in the fuel line, and able to catch and hold crud better this way.
Which, water being heavier than fuel, is where the "water separator" should be located, not a little grit filter. Seems to me that the small filter could have to fill half way with water (and possibly freeze) before the water pumped up the fuel line to the glass water separator. Or am I failing "physics" again?

I haven't seen 'em all, but I've not seen "water separators" on diesel equipment anywhere other than the lowest point of the fuel lines. (or air lines)
 

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Run her pretty good and see if maybe there is an Embolism not caught by the Self-bled system. Try this first rather than jump to the obscure suggestions first. KISS method usually solves most issues.



Ok I had time today to run my tractor. I ran it for about 10 minuet's running a round
the property. Turn the tractor off and restated it. It was OK. I let it sit for one half hour and went back and restarted it. OK.
I then left for a few hours and re started the tractor 6 hours later.
It started just fine and ran like it always did..
So if you replace your fuel filter. You must run the tractor for a few minuets or longer to remover the air in the lines.
"Toot-Toot!!!":lol:
 
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