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I've got two MacBook Pro Laptops myself. One personal and another used only for business. Both run Mac OSX and Windows 10. I can honestly say that the MacBooks run Windows better & more reliably than other PC Laptops I've had in the past. My personal Mac uses OSX almost exclusively while my business unit uses Windows 10 ~ 90% of the time due to some proprietary programs we have to use. Both boot out of OSX Bootcamp support.

The Mac hardware, build quality and materials are clearly superior than other top of the line PC laptops I've used over many years.
 

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IBM no longer produces personal computers, so they have nothing to lose by saying this.

The only issue I have with Apple is they are aiming for consumers so integrating into enterprise environments becomes more of a hassle. Their hardware, though, is the same hardware that's available elsewhere. It shines because Apple controls the firmware and the operating system, just like Oracle, HP, and IBM do for their equipment.

I don't get the correlation.
 

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IBM no longer produces personal computers, so they have nothing to lose by saying this.

The only issue I have with Apple is they are aiming for consumers so integrating into enterprise environments becomes more of a hassle. Their hardware, though, is the same hardware that's available elsewhere. It shines because Apple controls the firmware and the operating system, just like Oracle, HP, and IBM do for their equipment.



I don't get the correlation.
I have a quite nice MacBook Pro. The thing that I like about it is that nobody in IT knows anything about Macs and they leave me alone.
 

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IBM no longer produces personal computers, so they have nothing to lose by saying this.

The only issue I have with Apple is they are aiming for consumers so integrating into enterprise environments becomes more of a hassle. Their hardware, though, is the same hardware that's available elsewhere. It shines because Apple controls the firmware and the operating system, just like Oracle, HP, and IBM do for their equipment.

I don't get the correlation.
They're not reporting about home PC based users, they are talking about internal IBM staff assigned computers. There are suites of tools out there that let you control every element of the machine, it's not unlike schools that give every student an iPad. While it sounds fantastic, if its implemented correctly the student can only do what the admins allow. Enterprise roll-outs are the same....an admin worth their salt can determine its success or failure rate. Granted when you have a something like a windows active directory controlling log ins and user accounts, occasionally apps will choke, but the same can be said for poorly written windows apps.

With many services being cloud based, about the only reason to have one OS over the other is to utilize legacy software and user preferences.

Speaking or Oracle, not long ago we dropped it like a hot potato over their stink'n licensing fees, it was killing us. We ran side by side comparisons against a PostgreSQL database and with in a couple of milliseconds we returned the same results on identical hardware. I don't know if the Oracle hardware would have had better performance, but for their license fee, it didn't matter. The money did.

I have a pair of Mac book pros at home, an airbook and mac pro at work and they all just flat out work. I used to be a windows guy, but have since migrated....
 

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They're not reporting about home PC based users, they are talking about internal IBM staff assigned computers.
I know; I never said they were.

There are suites of tools out there that let you control every element of the machine, it's not unlike schools that give every student an iPad. While it sounds fantastic, if its implemented correctly the student can only do what the admins allow. Enterprise roll-outs are the same....an admin worth their salt can determine its success or failure rate. Granted when you have a something like a windows active directory controlling log ins and user accounts, occasionally apps will choke, but the same can be said for poorly written windows apps.
I know and they're not really that good. That's where the hassle comes in. We've tried quite a few. The management app simply disconnects from time to time or never connects at all on a fresh machine. At the end of the day, I don't care if it works or not; I'm a DBA. :)

With many services being cloud based, about the only reason to have one OS over the other is to utilize legacy software and user preferences.

Speaking or Oracle, not long ago we dropped it like a hot potato over their stink'n licensing fees, it was killing us. We ran side by side comparisons against a PostgreSQL database and with in a couple of milliseconds we returned the same results on identical hardware. I don't know if the Oracle hardware would have had better performance, but for their license fee, it didn't matter. The money did.

I have a pair of Mac book pros at home, an airbook and mac pro at work and they all just flat out work. I used to be a windows guy, but have since migrated....
I've never messed much with PostgreSQL; I never found a need to investigate it. I'm more of a SQL Server guy than anything.

Apple is okay, but they've gone downhill over the years with respect to releasing hardware. They're too focused on mobile at this point.

Windows 10 is working just as well as our Macbook Air at the house, so MS has made strides.
 
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