Green Tractor Talk banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
22,679 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
The time of year will be here soon enough that I will have nothing but ice on my driveway. When we get good snows like we've been having I get a good solid snow pack. Then when it starts warming up we have to put up with nasty ice for a few weeks. We have ashes from the wood stove to spread, but what we need is to be able to walk on the driveway (with a decent grade in part). I was thinking that some ice cleats that strap on your boots would work well.

Any recommendations with a low budget in mind?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,101 Posts
I don't have a recommendation other than you should NOT ever wear them in the house. They'll tear up hardwood floors quickly and walking on them on tile is like walking on ice without them. Have a designated place to remove them before you step inside. The last thing anyone needs to to fall and break their arse.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,432 Posts
I have Yak Traks the work good, easy on and off any boot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
747 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,973 Posts
I have Yak Traks the work good, easy on and off any boot.
I have used those but was never comfortable with them on ice. On snow, packed or otherwise, or variable terrain they're OK, but on ice they always felt "squirmy" underfoot as the springs have some give to them and there are no points to bite into the ice.

I have a pair of each of these and they're far superior to all of the other products I have used.

http://www.amazon.com/ALPS-Traction-Cleats-Prevent-Slipping/dp/B00HMWZCDO/ref=pd_sim_sg_1?ie=UTF8&refRID=1BEDXMS34XS56CYGAR3Z

http://www.amazon.com/Due-North-Everyday-Snow-Traction/dp/B00E3OWPLG/ref=pd_sim_sg_8?ie=UTF8&refRID=1GRKESVNHZCXC2J48CS6

They slip on any footwear easily and their carbide cleats really bite into the ice of a packed driveway.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,873 Posts
Believe it or not, a pair of old sweat socks pulled over your shoes will work wonders. I had to try it to be convinced, but they are remarkably effective...assuming of course that you can find a pair that are large enough to pull over you shoes/boots.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
144 Posts
Ok - a super-cheap fix from back in college days...
I had a pair of old wellington boots and used liquid nails to glue strips from a 40-grit sanding belt on the bottoms of 'em. I had the belt and adhesive already - pinched the boot between two scrap pieces of 1x6 lumber with wood clamps to be sure of a good bond. Worked great!
But like someone here said, don't wear 'em inside! Wellies are easy to take off at the doorstep, but these were brutal on flooring! They will tear up wood flooring, carpeting, linoleum.... They'll getcha in real trouble with the woman of the house! :lol:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22,679 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for all the suggestions!

The Kahtoola from REI look like the real deal - I'll have to consider them although pretty expensive.

The Yak Tracs - my first impression (just looking at the pics) is they would never work on solid glazed ice on a hill. Just seems like they would slide worse than without. I can see them working well in packed snow however.

The Crampon and Alps from Amazon might be the good one for me - I like the way the Alps goes on the boot with the rubber straps.

Sanding belt pieces is a great DIY - I love that kind of thing!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
171 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
238 Posts
I have used those but was never comfortable with them on ice. On snow, packed or otherwise, or variable terrain they're OK, but on ice they always felt "squirmy" underfoot as the springs have some give to them and there are no points to bite into the ice.

I have a pair of each of these and they're far superior to all of the other products I have used.

http://www.amazon.com/ALPS-Traction-Cleats-Prevent-Slipping/dp/B00HMWZCDO/ref=pd_sim_sg_1?ie=UTF8&refRID=1BEDXMS34XS56CYGAR3Z

Amazon.com: Due North Everyday G3 Ice and Snow Traction Aid: Sports & Outdoors

They slip on any footwear easily and their carbide cleats really bite into the ice of a packed driveway.
I have two pairs of the Due North ones, one in the car and one at home. I use them to run on my gravel road in the winter including when the road is completely covered in ice. You still feel tentative, but you can feel the spikes bite in with each step. Only time I've ever slipped with them on was when things started to melt and one of them got muddy enough to slip off mid-stride. :( The only caveat with them is that if you wear them a lot on gravel, the blue plastic pieces around the carbide spike will wear and break. The spike can then fall out, but I have a lot of the replacement spikes for such an occasion.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,716 Posts
Coaltrain,,,, I have used the Yak Traks going on 3 yrs. VERY IMPRESSED. My concrete drive is sloped, all the concrete sidewalks at church sloped and then a neighbor has the steepest concrete drive . I have walked up and down all the these and have never had a problem . The first time yes I did wonder if they would hold , after the first time have been sold . While trying to shovel the church sidewalks I would always be sliding or falling down, since using them no problems. I 've worn out one pair using the second pair and have a new pair still in the box setting next to basement door.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
17,963 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
618 Posts
I love my YakTrax Pro slip on traction devices. No need to remove from shoes for a quick trip into a building. Carry them in my county vehicle and personal vehicle. Love them. Bought from Blains Farm and Fleet best price around.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22,679 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Coaltrain,,,, I have used the Yak Traks going on 3 yrs. VERY IMPRESSED. My concrete drive is sloped, all the concrete sidewalks at church sloped and then a neighbor has the steepest concrete drive . I have walked up and down all the these and have never had a problem . The first time yes I did wonder if they would hold , after the first time have been sold . While trying to shovel the church sidewalks I would always be sliding or falling down, since using them no problems. I 've worn out one pair using the second pair and have a new pair still in the box setting next to basement door.
Thanks for adding that. I know that just looking at pics on-line doesn't prove or disprove their performance.

I've added each of the suggestions to my Amazon "save for later" cart - now just have to review this thread again and make a decision. Will need a pair for both my wife and myself.

Thanks for all the input!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,716 Posts
Thanks for adding that. I know that just looking at pics on-line doesn't prove or disprove their performance.

I've added each of the suggestions to my Amazon "save for later" cart - now just have to review this thread again and make a decision. Will need a pair for both my wife and myself.

Thanks for all the input!
No problem for the input, as KD7CAO stated I've walked across the basement carpet over at the church, on concrete basement floors and on tile flooring at a business. Haven't and won't try them on hard wood flooring.
Putting them on or taking them off simple and quick.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,554 Posts
Got a pair of YakTrack Pros last year on sale from Bean's. I put them on a pair of slick bottom worn down rubber bottom "duck feet" boots and leave them on. Takes a bit of getting used to them on hard ice and bare paving, I feel like they want to roll my ankle (but it's "just me":laugh:), but they are great carrying 2 milk crates of firewood splits on ice/packed snow. Since I went on my butt last week though I've been cheating and using the hand truck w/3 crates on it ("Lazy Man's Load").:laugh:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
My friends and I do a lot of winter hiking in central PA. By far the majority use Kahtoola Microspikes. They have a 2 year no questions asked warranty. The cheap alternative is some machine screws put into the soles of your shoes. Google screw shoes to get an idea of these.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top