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Picked up this trailer for use around the property, mainly maple sap collection. Cleaned it all up and there is some considerable amounts of John Deere Green on it. In one corner there is a small piece of wood on a bolt so the deck was once wood. Anyone recognize this? Any idea what it may have been? Is this some old JD equipment? Thank you
 

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AFAIK, Deere never made any trailers other than utility carts. Hard to say that it's Deere green paint. Could just as easily be Oliver green or any other rattle can green.

Does it have any tags/engravings anywhere on it at all?
 

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No engravings, stampings or marks of any kind on it that I have found thus far but I have to admit, I haven't crawled under it to see if there is something hiding. Will take a closer look tonight.

Not even sure if it was a trailer. I should have labeled it as 'Identify this frame'.

The wheels/tires I took off were E78-14 tires. So at least 40 - 50 years old and I'm assuming older.

Other than the wheels, this is the way it was at the auction.
Oliver green is a good possibility. That hadn't crossed my mind. Doubt it is spray can. The paint that remains was not coming off with the pressure sprayer.
 

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They did have, perhaps not make but sold Deere branded snowmobile trailers. I think. :dunno:
 

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They did have, perhaps not make but sold Deere branded snowmobile trailers. I think. :dunno:
The Deere snowmobile trailers that I remember were not near as rugged as the one in the picture. I think they were made by Snowco.
 

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John Deere did make a farm trailer in the 1930's or 40's, but it was bigger than that one.
You are right, Lowell. I have seen pictures of a dual wheel trailer that I believe was made for dealers to haul one tractor on behind a dual wheel truck. I don't remember where I saw the pictures; maybe Green Magazine.
 

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I went back an looked and there were several dual/triple axle "Industrial Trailers" made. Models 1100, 1120, 1125, 1135, 1145, etc.. Mostly dual axle with a few available as triple axle units. Mostly built in the 1950s/60s.

The only single axle units I could find were the snowmobile trailers mentioned (Models JD73, JD74, JD75, JD648 and JD972 all made in the 1970s) and the model 10, 15, 16, 20, 25, 50 Utility Trailers (dates made unknown).

If your's is a Deere, it would have to be one of those latter model numbers but the pics I saw of them all have different tongue setups on them from what you've got.
 

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identify this trailer

I went back an looked and there were several dual/triple axle "Industrial Trailers" made. Models 1100, 1120, 1125, 1135, 1145, etc.. Mostly dual axle with a few available as triple axle units. Mostly built in the 1950s/60s.

The only single axle units I could find were the snowmobile trailers mentioned (Models JD73, JD74, JD75, JD648 and JD972 all made in the 1970s) and the model 10, 15, 16, 20, 25, 50 Utility Trailers (dates made unknown).

If your's is a Deere, it would have to be one of those latter model numbers but the pics I saw of them all have different tongue setups on them from what you've got.
Not sure what you really have here but it looks like it might be the frame from a old manure spreader. However I don't remember them having that type of pull connection on the tongue.

Just guessing.
 

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My vote is for all home built. The pictures are not real clear to me but is that not a steer axle? Probably welded solid at the king pins. The spring hangers do not look to belong to the frame they are welded on. Factory built stuff does not normally mix up materials so much. Clannel, pipe and angle.
 

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My vote is for all home built. The pictures are not real clear to me but is that not a steer axle? Probably welded solid at the king pins. The spring hangers do not look to belong to the frame they are welded on. Factory built stuff does not normally mix up materials so much. Clannel, pipe and angle.
And holes were drilled for the u-bolts to fit. Looks like the spindles are bolted to the ends of the axle too.
 
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My vote is for all home built. The pictures are not real clear to me but is that not a steer axle? Probably welded solid at the king pins. The spring hangers do not look to belong to the frame they are welded on. Factory built stuff does not normally mix up materials so much. Clannel, pipe and angle.
I agree, likely home built................

Does the axle housing look like it has been narrowed either in the center or near the frame rails? That's a common thing to do when making a home built unit after getting the axle from another source..................commonly used are old RV axles, other utility trailer axles or mobile home axles as many are just "hanging around going no where".....under homes behind the skirting (or straw bales....) although that doesn't look like a mobile home axle, but it could be a very old one.

I had a John Deere snowmobile trailer and the frame didn't look like that......plus they all tilted on the tongue and I seem to remember the tongue being square or rectangular tubing........
 

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AFAIK, Deere never made any trailers other than utility carts. Hard to say that it's Deere green paint. Could just as easily be Oliver green or any other rattle can green.

Does it have any tags/engravings anywhere on it at all?

They used to make gravity wagons, wagon running gear, and maybe hay wagons. Now I think they only make yard carts.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Hello all and thank you for the replies! When I first looked at it at the auction and at home, my first thought was some sort of smaller manure spreader as well. The snowmobile trailer idea is a good one. That hadn't crossed my mind and I rode a Deere sled back in the 80's. A smaller gravity box had also crossed my mind.
I don't think it is a homemade job.
Nothing stood out as proof that the axle had been cut down or that it could have been a front steer axle.
Hopefully I'll be home early enough while there is still light out and get some better photos of these areas.

Of course it is a possibility that the green could be some other manufacturer such as Oliver which someone mentioned to me.

I'm curious about the trailers that JD had in the 50's and 60's. I'll try to find some info on those.

Should have some more photos on tonight or tomorrow.
 

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I'm curious about the trailers that JD had in the 50's and 60's. I'll try to find some info on those.
If you search on "Trailer" on jdparts.com those will come up as the 11XX Industrial trailers. They all seem to be dual or triple axle and all have A-frame tongues.

The snowmobile trailers had a straight tongue like your's has but they appear to be longer. They also all tilted (for loading and unloading sleds) so they had a catch welded to the top of the tongue to hold the bed when it was tilted up flat for towing. I'd think if your trailer was from one of those you'd be able to see some sort of trace of the catch welds on your tongue. (Something else for you to look for tonight! :laugh:)
 
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I guess whiles its history or source would be interesting to know, as long as it meets your needs, that is the main thing...............It doesn't sound like you have plans to attempt to make the trailer "road worthy", but even if you do, the process for registering and putting a plate on it vary widely from state to state.

Regardless, make sure you post project pictures of how you make the trailer meet your specific needs. Those types of projects are always of interest here on GTT, especially with lots of photos........

Just out of curiosity, what are the rough overall dimensions of the frame as shown?
 

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If you search on "Trailer" on jdparts.com those will come up as the 11XX Industrial trailers. They all seem to be dual or triple axle and all have A-frame tongues.

The snowmobile trailers had a straight tongue like your's has but they appear to be longer. They also all tilted (for loading and unloading sleds) so they had a catch welded to the top of the tongue to hold the bed when it was tilted up flat for towing. I'd think if your trailer was from one of those you'd be able to see some sort of trace of the catch welds on your tongue. (Something else for you to look for tonight! :laugh:)
I also seem to recall the center of the bed over the axle had a "pivot point" to allow you to swing the front of the trailer left or right to permit the sled to be driven off the trailer, while the trailer remained hooked to the tow vehicle. You first tilted the bed up and then rotated the trailer bed left or right. It didn't always allow the front of the trailer to touch the surface the way the rear of the trailer would when tilted, but it still was far better than dragging the snowmobile backwards off the trailer and then skidding the snowmobile sideways to be able to drive away from the trailer.

Snowmobiling in the late 1960's and 1970's was an entirely different experience than it is today. Lot's of lifting, dragging and of course, the rear suspensions with "Bogey wheels" which moved about 3" totally.......and many of the front steering of the sleds had no suspension.
 

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I still think it's homebuilt!
 
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Discussion Starter #20 (Edited)
nine.jpg six.jpg seven.jpg five.jpg eight.jpg Completely agree with your memories of the sled trailer. Most all tilted and swiveled.
Didn't get home in time for good photos due to the dark. Took a few this morning.
The entire hub does look odd, however, could be a steering gear that has been welded in place. Haven't found any welds yet. Will give it a closer examination this evening if home before dark. It does appear to have some sort of spindle but at the same time I'm not seeing where anything was welded to stay in place. I'm not entirely knowledgeable about older axles.
The frame is about 3 feet wide and 6 feet long.
Agree though that the springs do appear to be a bit to wide as there is a plate welded to the frame to accommodate.
I'm beginning to agree it is probably home made. If so, someone did a darn good job with it. One thing that makes me question the home made theory are the square holes in the frame. That seems to be pretty much a factory/manufacturer thing.
 
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