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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I know there has been some back and forth about this, but wondering if anyone can chime in about reducing the idle speed and the effects on a actual experience basis. There is no doubt that these newer machines run a much higher idle compared to older machines. It's possible it's due to emissions?

Has anyone successful or not done such a thing here on a 1025/2025R?
 

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General consensus has been "stay with factory speeds". These ain't yer granpa's Cat D4's.:laugh"

Emissions, cooling after PTO/Loader/Backhoe use shut-down, general electrical draw during winter light use, Yanmar/JD never gave anybody a good reason that I know of, except that it's in the Manual and the Shop Manual. I must admit when I got my 1026rTLB I had the exact same reaction and wanted to turn the wick down on mine... But cooler heads prevailed around this Forum.

If you decide to do it, keep us all informed on performance AND longevity!!!:good2:
 

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I’ve been working in the diesel industry for 30 years and the evolution has changed dramatically. The last 15 years emission standards have changed everything, the days of a idling Diesel engine have long been gone. If a diesel motor idles excessively at low rpm it can’t generate enough heat to eat its own soot so to speak and it starts plugging up everything and slobbering oil. I have no direct input pertaining about the newer scuts as mine is older but if the factory set it, I personally would leave it as is.


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I’ve written about this in the past. There’s a nasty harmonic vibration that exists on this particular engine trans combo at certain speeds. If you lower the low idle speed, you will definitely increase the vibrations from the engine. You will not find a smoother RPM at anything lower than the factory spec. I know it sounds funny to hear them idle what sounds fast, but it’s actually healthy for the engine. Faster idle speeds also increases the heat. This heat is much needed in the winter time to help warm up the engine and keep it warm.

I tried this experiment running the engine at lower RPMS just to see it dance around. If you look at several other threads in the forum here, for example, the air cleaner bracket thread, things get broken, some pretty easy, especially when things are vibrating enough.

My suggestion? Keep the RPMS up. High enough where things are smooth. That will make your tractor live a long happy life. :thumbup1gif:
 

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While I was initially surprised at the higher idle speed on the new tractors, It doesn't take long getting used to the higher idle speed on the 1 series. Its nice not to have that incessant harmonic vibration which accompanies the former low idle speed of these little Yanmar diesels and made everything throughout the tractor shudder. With my 455, over the years, the vibration damaged the hood side panel mounts, the hood mounts themselves, motor mounts and without thread lock, the fuel filter / water separator canister wouldn't stay on the engine.

The higher idle speed on the 1 series permits the tractor to be driven even at the idle speed. The older machines, with the lower idle speed, the entire machine would shudder even more when either directional pedal was pushed, requiring the throttle to be used to increase the RPM's. Overall, while the older machines did have a lower idle speed, the engine speed was usually increased above idle almost immediately after starting to reduce the vibration and also permit the machine to be moved.

Now, my only issue with the 1 series idle speed is the way the engine shakes and shudders upon shutdown, as it seems somewhat "violent". I wouldn't be surprised to find the vibration damage issues which some have experienced in the 1 series, such as the broken air filter brackets, etc., likely occur during the engine shut down verses at the engines operating idle speed. This engine shutdown shaking concerns me more than the other aspects of the tractors idle speed. But I still personally wouldn't change the idle speed on the 1 series, out of concern for the long term consequences to the engine and tractor.
 

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Now, my only issue with the 1 series idle speed is the way the engine shakes and shudders upon shutdown, as it seems somewhat "violent". I wouldn't be surprised to find the vibration damage issues which some have experienced in the 1 series, such as the broken air filter brackets, etc., likely occur during the engine shut down verses at the engines operating idle speed. This engine shutdown shaking concerns me more than the other aspects of the tractors idle speed. But I still personally wouldn't change the idle speed on the 1 series, out of concern for the long term consequences to the engine and tractor.
Oddly, the Kubota BX-series engines seem to have the same violent shake during shutdown.
 

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Do you think the shaking at shutdown on the 1-series has anything to do with the engine being bolted to rubber engine mounts? I don't think the earlier 2-series had rubber mounts and its engine doesn't shake at shutdown.
 

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Oddly, the Kubota BX-series engines seem to have the same violent shake during shutdown.
My FIL has a 17 year old BX2200, at an idle things start falling off the tractor it vibrates and shakes so bad, and that is not a joke. But it also idles much lower, I wonder if the newer Kabota's have gone to a high idle?
 
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My FIL has a 17 year old BX2200, at an idle things start falling off the tractor it vibrates and shakes so bad, and that is not a joke. But it also idles much lower, I wonder if the newer Kabota's have gone to a high idle?
I was going to check the operator's manual for one of the newer Kubota's but of course I discoverd that Kubota, unlike JD, does not make its tractor operator's manuals available on-line. That is, other than to purchase.
 

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It took me a good while to get used to the high idle on my 1025r (first JD I've owned) since every other diesel I've ever owned was not this way. The worst thing for me is shutting it off 'cause it dies so violently. I always assumed this has something to do with emissions so I would not change it.

My 12 year-old Kubota diesel ZTR doesn't have a tach but I guess-ti-mate it idles down to 8 or 9 hundred rpm, and is just as smooth as as WOT. My 22 year-old Cub Cadet (Mitsubishi) diesel idles around 8 - 9 hundred rpm and is the smoothest running and easiest starting diesel I've ever owned. So I really don't understand the vibration problems.

A friend of mine bought a Kubota scut about the same time I bought my 1025r (don't remember the model) but he also complained about it having the same high idle. Have never heard him say anything about vibrations though.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks for the reply guys!

Yeah, I probably won't dick with it. Given it's still under warranty and the possible problems mentioned here.

I'm sort of use to the high idle, but I still find myself grabbing the throttle to "try" to lower it even more. My dads 4400 idles right down to just shug shug shug and I've got many hours on that.

Thanks everyone again for your knowledgeable advise as always.
 

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It does take some getting used to for sure.
I cant say I mind though, the 955 I had for a while idled lower, but that think shook like CRAZY at idle.
Id always throttle down before hopping off to do something, and always throttle back up just a bit to stop all the darn rattles. I cant recall exactly, but Im pretty sure where I ended up leaving it most times was right around the "normal" speed of the 1025/2025.
 
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It does take some getting used to for sure.
I cant say I mind though, the 955 I had for a while idled lower, but that think shook like CRAZY at idle.
Id always throttle down before hopping off to do something, and always throttle back up just a bit to stop all the darn rattles. I cant recall exactly, but Im pretty sure where I ended up leaving it most times was right around the "normal" speed of the 1025/2025.
Heck Jim, our 2555 doesn't like to idle either, as soon as you fire it you have to bump it up to about 1000 rpms or it lays there bulking and pulsating. Of course, she's 29 years old with 17,000 hours on it too.
 
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I lowered the idle speed on mine. Took about 3 min to turn the throttle cable stops all the way down...and about 3 min more to turn it back up haha. It just shook and vibrated too much as others have mentioned.

Funny, I too keep grabing for the throtle lever thining its not all the way down.

My last tractor idled at I swear 300 RPM's. You would think after 200 hours I would have figured it out. Guess I'm dum:banghead:
 
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