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Hello everyone, recently picked up a 1025. Couldn’t find or missed what I was looking for in owners manual. I start my 1025 and load it onto trailer in the morning and set at idle, keep tractor idling between sites for snow clearing and leave idling on trailer when not in use. I know I’m adding hours to my machine, burning fuel, noise pollution etc. but is that more harm than shutting down. Temperature is around -20C or 0F. If it’s down for an hour plus will I have trouble starting again?

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If you are keeping the tractor idling while on trailer and moving the trailer around, that means that you have it in neutral, correct? I would think you would want to shut off the tractor so you can leave it in gear. That way it will be less likely to move around on the trailer, even when tied down.
 

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If you are keeping the tractor idling while on trailer and moving the trailer around, that means that you have it in neutral, correct? I would think you would want to shut off the tractor so you can leave it in gear. That way it will be less likely to move around on the trailer, even when tied down.
Unlike a gear-driven transmission, a HST tractor will drift slowly even while "in gear". Only solution is wheel chocks, parking brake and chains.
 

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Hello everyone, recently picked up a 1025. Couldn’t find or missed what I was looking for in owners manual. I start my 1025 and load it onto trailer in the morning and set at idle, keep tractor idling between sites for snow clearing and leave idling on trailer when not in use. I know I’m adding hours to my machine, burning fuel, noise pollution etc. but is that more harm than shutting down. Temperature is around -20C or 0F. If it’s down for an hour plus will I have trouble starting again?

Thanks
I personally would not leave my tractor run while hauling it down the highway. Maybe just me, but I wouldn't do that! :dunno:
Concerning whether you will have trouble re-starting it, nope.
As long as you allow the glow plugs to cycle, the engine will start.
 

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I transport my 1026r around on a trailer to clear my grandparents and parents out. I set the parking breaking and put it in neutral and chain it down and have no problems with start up later on above 15 degrees in the sun. the tractor doesn't move at all with the break and chains . If its really cold out ( around 0 degrees) and the sun isn't up yet ill leave the tractor running but i honestly don't think its really necessary. Its a tougher start up when its that cold out and your drives 50mph ( think wind chill factor) but its for a short amount of time. I also clear my driveway first, so its warm when i transport it. I'd say you're fine to leave it running when its around zero to make it easier on your battery and to keep everything flowing nicely for when you unload.

I don't know the rules though for leaving equipment running while travailing. There is probably some rule but during snow storms or right after one , the cops around here are more upset lately about guys driving around with plows and their wings on and being about 12 feet wide driving down the road....
 

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Its a tougher start up when its that cold out and your drives 50mph ( think wind chill factor) but its for a short amount of time.
Wind chill has no effect on metal and plastic... it only effects human and animal parts. The metal and plastic parts will however cool off faster in the 50MPH wind. :)
 

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Have never thought about it but now that I have...I'd shut it off.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Always left in neutral with brake and tied down. It’s about 15 minuites into the city from my place, I could drive the tractor to and from the dozen sites I have once I get there, so trailering isn’t bad once I’m in the city.
 

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At zero degrees, I would leave it running with the parking BRAKE on and and tranny in neutral. Of course, tied down. My previous 1025R did not like to start well in cold weather and needed help such as a block heater which you would not have available to you once you load up. Diesels do not like cold weather. I would also put cardboard or something similar similar in front of the radiator to help keep it warm. Remember to load it backwards as specified in the manual. In your case, that is even more important. Also note that the tranny needs to be kept warm and it takes longer for it to warm up than it does the engine. You may be adding a few hours and burning a little more fuel, but you are saving a lot of wear and tear on your equipment in the long run.

Now if you had a TierIV unit where you were faced with regens, I would change my stance on this as excessive idling causes more regens. The 1025R is less than 25HP, therefore does not have to meet the same specs as those above 25HP.

Dave
 

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Also note that the tranny needs to be kept warm and it takes longer for it to warm up than it does the engine. You may be adding a few hours and burning a little more fuel, but you are saving a lot of wear and tear on your equipment in the long run.

Dave
Dave, I think you hit the real issue more than the engine. Especially since right of the trailer it is going to work, waste some fuel on the trailer or wasting it so the trans is not damaged working hard cold.
 

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Temp dependent, I'd leave it run <=0*

Wind chill has no effect on metal and plastic... it only effects human and animal parts. The metal and plastic parts will however cool off faster in the 50MPH wind. :)
While I know this to be true, it does "make a difference".

My 2320 has never failed to start in cold temps when parked. However, the one time I hauled it in -5* for 3 hours on the trailer, it would NOT start to unload.
It took 45 min plugged in, with a heater on the engine and a battery charger on the battery to get it going.
 

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I would have no problem leaving a machine idling as you are doing in those low temperatures.
I probably even would bump it up a notch over lowest idle setting.
X2

What he said.


 

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While I know this to be true, it does "make a difference".

My 2320 has never failed to start in cold temps when parked. However, the one time I hauled it in -5* for 3 hours on the trailer, it would NOT start...
The only thing adding wind does is to cool things down faster, it cannot cool things down below the ambient temperature. Zero degrees parked or zero degrees going down the highway at 70mph "feels" the same to an inanimate object.

It could be that when parked it never fully got down to the ambient temperature so being hauled on a trailer allowed it to fully cool down to ambient. In that sense, being on a trailer in the wind will get your machine as cold as the ambient temperature allows while being parked provides some warmth from the ground or other nearby radiative sources - especially if under a cover or near a building.
 

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I would have no problem leaving a machine idling as you are doing in those low temperatures.
I probably even would bump it up a notch over lowest idle setting.
X2

What he said.


X3.

Hauled a Case backhoe 50 miles and left it running when is was extremely cold the night before and that day. No problem. If boomed and chained down properly, you will have no problems trailering it.
 

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The only thing adding wind does is to cool things down faster, it cannot cool things down below the ambient temperature. Zero degrees parked or zero degrees going down the highway at 70mph "feels" the same to an inanimate object.

It could be that when parked it never fully got down to the ambient temperature so being hauled on a trailer allowed it to fully cool down to ambient. In that sense, being on a trailer in the wind will get your machine as cold as the ambient temperature allows while being parked provides some warmth from the ground or other nearby radiative sources - especially if under a cover or near a building.
Most cars tell you the outside temperature. They use a plastic sensor usually mounted in front of the radiator. Being in the wind doesn't change the reading.

My old 2005 SRT10 Ram had a baffled grill. This keeps any extra air flow out. Other than what the radiator could handle. The left baffle had a U shaped cutout so air could still blow in on the temperature sensor.
 

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I’d let it idle, better for it to stay at running temp. It’s not that weird, guys in tree services tow around diesel branch chippers and leave them idling all the time. Especially in the winter.
 

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I transport my 1026r around on a trailer to clear my grandparents and parents out. I set the parking breaking and put it in neutral and chain it down and have no problems with start up later on above 15 degrees in the sun.
Just curious on your reasoning for putting in neutral when trailering? I always leave mine in range to assist with immobilization. Wondering if I'm overlooking something.
 

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Just curious on your reasoning for putting in neutral when trailering? I always leave mine in range to assist with immobilization. Wondering if I'm overlooking something.

The only reason to put the tranny in neutral is if you leave the engine running. I probably have not had my 4066R in neutral more than a few times. If real cold, I put it in neutral to start it as specified by the manual. I sold my 1025R over 3 years ago, but I seem to recall that it had to be in neutral to be able to start it??? My 4066R will start in any position. Anyone notice on Kubotas that you have to push in a clutch to start it?

Dave
 
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