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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My 4020 had a Powr Shift, my 4430 had a Quad Range, I loved them both and used them both as hard as they would work.

I have 2 pieces of property, one has great soil and has been worked as a farm in the past couple of decades, the other has laid dormant for many decades. There are terraces so at one time it was worked. I currently have 3032e, considered the 3046r, but now thinking that the 3043D with the shuttle may be a better fit.

My goal is to rid the place of cactus(about 30acres solid), rip/subsoil as deep as possible with a 22b ripper, plow(rocks), and then finish disc and ultimately put the place in coastal. I want to do this all myself, but these small tractors with hydrostatic transmissions worry me about longevity. Once this is done, it will be used as a feed, mowing and driveway maintenance. I really didn't want to step up to a 4 or 5 series, mainly because I am a cheap skate and don't want to spring for new equipment.

Is my concern justified? Either tractor would be a huge improvement in capability and productivity over the current tractor.

I have been scouring the classifieds, auctions, Craigslist and even Facebook for a used 1250 or 1450 for an outright purchase with no luck.

Thanks!
 

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For serious AG work, nothing less than a 4 series, preferably with R1 AG tires.

Dave
 

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My guess would have been that 4430 with the quad shift would have been closer to a 5 series today then a 3 series.
Are you looking for more like what you had before or just a small step up from what you have now?
 

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I grew up running quad shift 4440s and powershift 4650s, 4755s, back when those tractors were new.
I have not seen any of the smaller machines 2-3 series that have the weight, and or power or capacities to offer the ability for deep tillage work, the tillage tools I have had behind 3Rs seem to have me more into the tail wagging the dog type scenario.
Even the 4 series which is much much heaver and more capable then a 3 series, still isn't even close to something like a current 5 series or an old 4440.
 

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You might consider another 3020,4020 or 706, 806 to get the heavy work done. You would be in the $6,000-10,000 range to buy it, use it and then sell it for what you paid. The other advantage is there are 12'-15' disks and plows for these that are far cheaper than what the compact ones go for. Once the hard work is done your compact could fill your needs for maintenance and upkeep.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I missed 2 really good deals, a really clean synchro range 3010 diesel for $5000 and a 3020 diesel with powr shift and 2700ish hours for $8500, both sold within hours of being posted for sale.

I think I will search for 60-72 10 or 20 series, I liked the old synchro range, that was the transmission I learned on.

I just hate to buy equipment for a tractor that I am going to keep for just a few years. Equipment never holds its value like these old tractors do.


Thanks guys, I had this notion that I was kidding myself in the back of my mind, y'all just confirmed what I already knew.
 

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Any chance some one in the area could do this for you? Save on buying a tractor just too sell later.
Exactly what I was going to suggest.
Might even foster a relationship that yields future benefits.
 

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Thanks guys, I had this notion that I was kidding myself in the back of my mind, y'all just confirmed what I already knew.
I wouldn't go that far, you also didn't mention how much time you have, or if you did I missed it. 30 acres really isn't that much, certainly not too much for a small tractor, especially on the heavy work is done. Buying and flipping sounds like fun, but can also be a hassle. I agree with 5 shank there too, if a local farmer can come do the heavy tillage and then you can take it from there. A 3 series would be more than capable of handling that, even with a hydrostatic tranny.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Any chance some one in the area could do this for you? Save on buying a tractor just too sell later.
Exactly what I was going to suggest.
Might even foster a relationship that yields future benefits.
I wouldn't go that far, you also didn't mention how much time you have, or if you did I missed it. 30 acres really isn't that much, certainly not too much for a small tractor, especially on the heavy work is done. Buying and flipping sounds like fun, but can also be a hassle. I agree with 5 shank there too, if a local farmer can come do the heavy tillage and then you can take it from there. A 3 series would be more than capable of handling that, even with a hydrostatic tranny.
I had considered this but gave up when I realized there are too many "weekend" farmers locally to hire it out, they are only looking for their next monthly payment and they do not have the equipment or knowledge to properly do what I am asking, most don't even know what a ripper is. I bet I am one of the few people in this area that has an actual long shank parabolic ripper. The few established working farms in the area are too busy this time of year to fit me in.

When we were "ranching & farming" after we got entirely out of the peanut business in 1980, we had our hay to worry with and spent the rest of the time cutting & baling hay for the public from spring to fall, prepping seedbeds and sowing winter forage in the late summer and early fall and then plowing, disking and other tillage work in the fall & winter for spring planting of either coastal sprigs or other hay crops. There just isn't enough land or money for a person to justify being a for hire farmer in this area, land prices have sky rocketed as tracts of land shrink in size. Most large tracts of land that are owned by one person are simply hay producers to sell to the boutique "ranchers" with 1 or 2 cows, a few goats or couple of horses. People are enamored with the prospect of "being" a farmer, until they realize how much dedication, time and sweat is involved for the little bit of pay it reaps.

I salute those that can actually make it work in this day and age when everything from the local population, corporate farms to the federal government are fighting you and doing their best to shut you down.

I have been looking at used JD 50-75hp tractors and I think I will just bite the bullet, buy and then sell after the initial heavy work is complete. I have the ripper already, so good 3 or 4 bottom plows and 8ft or 10ft disks are are plentiful and cheap. If I package it correctly and buy smart, I should come out flush on the other end once the work is complete. Who knows, it may just remain in the stable and then I can be a weekend farmer for hire, LOL. I don't need a tractor that is 4wd, has a cab or one that has a loader, so that opens up the market, and no body seems to want a OOS either, need cold ac and plenty of heat I guess.
 

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I believe you have answered your question. My only comment is that hydrostatic drive can handle the work. It’s just not fuel efficient. Versatile made a bi-directional tractor where the seat swiveled in the cab so you could drive it either way. It’s now owned and produced by New Holland. International Harvester made a hydrostatic drive tractor as well before they became CaseIH, I operated one with a loader years ago.
 

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I had considered this but gave up when I realized there are too many "weekend" farmers locally to hire it out, they are only looking for their next monthly payment and they do not have the equipment or knowledge to properly do what I am asking, most don't even know what a ripper is. I bet I am one of the few people in this area that has an actual long shank parabolic ripper. The few established working farms in the area are too busy this time of year to fit me in.

When we were "ranching & farming" after we got entirely out of the peanut business in 1980, we had our hay to worry with and spent the rest of the time cutting & baling hay for the public from spring to fall, prepping seedbeds and sowing winter forage in the late summer and early fall and then plowing, disking and other tillage work in the fall & winter for spring planting of either coastal sprigs or other hay crops. There just isn't enough land or money for a person to justify being a for hire farmer in this area, land prices have sky rocketed as tracts of land shrink in size. Most large tracts of land that are owned by one person are simply hay producers to sell to the boutique "ranchers" with 1 or 2 cows, a few goats or couple of horses. People are enamored with the prospect of "being" a farmer, until they realize how much dedication, time and sweat is involved for the little bit of pay it reaps.

I salute those that can actually make it work in this day and age when everything from the local population, corporate farms to the federal government are fighting you and doing their best to shut you down.

I have been looking at used JD 50-75hp tractors and I think I will just bite the bullet, buy and then sell after the initial heavy work is complete. I have the ripper already, so good 3 or 4 bottom plows and 8ft or 10ft disks are are plentiful and cheap. If I package it correctly and buy smart, I should come out flush on the other end once the work is complete. Who knows, it may just remain in the stable and then I can be a weekend farmer for hire, LOL. I don't need a tractor that is 4wd, has a cab or one that has a loader, so that opens up the market, and no body seems to want a OOS either, need cold ac and plenty of heat I guess.
I understand your points but sometimes one of those full time farmers will do something on the side for very selected friends or those who ask really nicely. I know we used to do some of that when we were not in the custom work business nor did we want to be in that business.

Still, most farmers are suckers for a request for help when it's politely and respectfully phrased.

Treefarmer
 
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