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Discussion Starter #1
Right now, Sony has some good price drops on a couple of their well-appointed, 4K televisions.

For the 2017 model year, they have a couple of TV 'families' that are really nice. The 800E and 900E models offer a lot of excellent features and excellent picture quality while not literally requiring a second mortgage on your home to buy. They have also instituted some price drops that make these particular sets really good values for what you get.

The 800E family offers 4K, HDR, Edge lit LED with Frame Dimming and Sony's Tri-Luminous Display processing. The picture quality on these sets is really nice - I have one.

The 900E family offers everything that the 800E family has except that it's a direct lit FALD set (Full Array, Local Dimming) which gives the best backlighting and overall PQ. It also has the X1 processor (which means it -may- qualify to get the Dolby Vision update). Picture quality on these sets is excellent - I have one.


Current pricing on the 55" model in both families makes them excellent overall values with the 800E being $800 and the 900E being $1000.

While these prices will be a bit shocking to some, and understandably so, they are some of the best prices I've seen on sets with really high quality 4K / HDR panels. And if you want a much larger screen, the 65" or 75" 900E would give my 940D a run for the money, and their prices are considerably less than I paid for the 940D.

Anyway... If you're in the market for a really nice TV that's a bit on the larger side, check out these 55" models before Sony pulls the sale prices.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Since the edit function doesn't appear to be working, I'll add here:

XBR55X800E and XBR55X900E are the model numbers of the 55" sets if anyone is interested in looking them up.

The 800E family has a 43", 49", and 55" model.
The 900E family has a 49", 55", 65", and 75" model.

The two numbers after the XBR denote the screen size. Change them out as you see fit to see if one of these sets is to your liking.

Anyone who knows me knows that I don't like to come out and make recommendations like this. I'm always concerned that someone might have a bad experience and it will fall back on me. But, I really like these sets.

Also, if you're one who believes in extended warranties, but the SquareTrade Warranty on any of these sets from Costco. You do NOT need to purchase the set from Costco, you get a three ADDITIONAL year warranty, and the price is better than anywhere else you can buy it. I believe the most expensive warranty is $89 and it applies to sets over $1000 in price.
 

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I’ve been passively watching the progress with these new TVs. It’s nice to see the newer technology come down in price quickly.

But I still just don’t understand all the hype with 4k since there is very little content the average person can get. The only thing I see is Netflix which has a very limited library and costs quite a bit more to get the 4k service.

I’ve had my 50” 1080p Samsung for almost a year now and still am amazed with how great the picture is. Of course our TV room is small and we are sitting ~9’ away. So until 4k content is main stream I just don’t see any reason to upgrade.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I’ve been passively watching the progress with these new TVs. It’s nice to see the newer technology come down in price quickly.

But I still just don’t understand all the hype with 4k since there is very little content the average person can get. The only thing I see is Netflix which has a very limited library and costs quite a bit more to get the 4k service.

I’ve had my 50” 1080p Samsung for almost a year now and still am amazed with how great the picture is. Of course our TV room is small and we are sitting ~9’ away. So until 4k content is main stream I just don’t see any reason to upgrade.
I was of the exact same viewpoint as you until about a year ago when my primary TV died. I replaced it with a Sony 4K w/ HDR.

While 4K does not really "wow" you, here's what it DOES do: It allows you to sit closer to the TV (or have a larger screen viewed at the same distance) and not be looking at a pixelated picture.

The "wow factor" in these TV's is in the HDR. Driving the panel with HDR content adds a lot of depth to the images and is actually impressive. Driving a quality 4K panel with BluRay (1080p) content can provide for some really nice viewing. I have Avatar on BluRay and there's much more detail that's now viewable and the colors have more "pop" to them.

In the end, it's all about the quality of the original content. I have Indiana Jones and the Raiders of the Lost Ark on standard DVD. Playing it on this panel from my Sony UBP-X800 player (UHD, HDR capable) shows a REALLY nice picture with a lot of detail. I was actually quite surprised at just how good that particular disc looked even though it was mastered in 480i.
 

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I was of the exact same viewpoint as you until about a year ago when my primary TV died. I replaced it with a Sony 4K w/ HDR.

While 4K does not really "wow" you, here's what it DOES do: It allows you to sit closer to the TV (or have a larger screen viewed at the same distance) and not be looking at a pixelated picture.

The "wow factor" in these TV's is in the HDR. Driving the panel with HDR content adds a lot of depth to the images and is actually impressive. Driving a quality 4K panel with BluRay (1080p) content can provide for some really nice viewing. I have Avatar on BluRay and there's much more detail that's now viewable and the colors have more "pop" to them.

In the end, it's all about the quality of the original content. I have Indiana Jones and the Raiders of the Lost Ark on standard DVD. Playing it on this panel from my Sony UBP-X800 player (UHD, HDR capable) shows a REALLY nice picture with a lot of detail. I was actually quite surprised at just how good that particular disc looked even though it was mastered in 480i.
I know I may be missing out on some of what you are talking about. But 1080p on a 50” screen at our viewing distance seems to be a sweet spot. It just kind of makes sense to me since I am feeding the TV with 1080p content with Netflix at least. Still haven’t figured out what Hulu and CBS All Access streams at.

In a similar thread some time ago the subject of upsampling came up. From what I understand.....with a 4k TV fed with 1080p content the TV will upsample the feed to be viewed in 4k. With my experience with photography and digital editing, you always wanted to avoid upsampling because added artifacts would skew the image.

I’ll have to do more resesearch the HDR part. I see that some TV’s claim HDR and some HDR10. I don’t know what any of that means but do understand it will give more depth to colors. But again - does my feed from from my Roku player account for this? Maybe the HDR/HDR10 part is all about the TV display itself.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I know I may be missing out on some of what you are talking about. But 1080p on a 50” screen at our viewing distance seems to be a sweet spot. It just kind of makes sense to me since I am feeding the TV with 1080p content with Netflix at least. Still haven’t figured out what Hulu and CBS All Access streams at.

In a similar thread some time ago the subject of upsampling came up. From what I understand.....with a 4k TV fed with 1080p content the TV will upsample the feed to be viewed in 4k. With my experience with photography and digital editing, you always wanted to avoid upsampling because added artifacts would skew the image.

I’ll have to do more resesearch the HDR part. I see that some TV’s claim HDR and some HDR10. I don’t know what any of that means but do understand it will give more depth to colors. But again - does my feed from from my Roku player account for this? Maybe the HDR/HDR10 part is all about the TV display itself.
Upscaling is present in every television. Any panel is only capable of displaying at its native resolution.

4K panels will require upscaling for everything that isn't 4K. 1080, 720, 480

1080 panels can't handle 4K and require upscaling for 720 and 480.

In a nutshell, when you drive a panel, the signal is either native or below native. Anything below native will be upscaled in the TV. If you happen to try and drive the panel with something -higher- than native, you get nothing. Some devices have excellent upscaling engines, some do not. Since all of my TV's use the same engine, and they are all excellent, I drive the panels with native resolutions and let the TV upscale anything that's sub-4K. For me, this results in the most consistent experience in terms of picture quality.

Another reason to let a 4K TV do all the upscaling is because, like you said, you are introducing pixels that were not there originally. If you upscale in an external device (to 1080, let's say), the TV will still have to upscale to 4K. In this scenario, you're upscaling twice, and the second time degrades the picture an appreciable amount.

4K streaming content is available from Netflix and Amazon. I don't believe Hulu has any 4K content, so it would be 1080 at best. CBS and NBC have 1080 content, so that would be the max stream quality. ABC and FOX are 720 (if you can believe that).

I have an antenna and grab OTA HD content from CBS and NBC - PQ on the 4K panels is excellent. Part of this is because all of the transcoding that the providers do to get the signal into your house is absent. Colors are more vibrant and there's actually better overall definition to the pictures as well (the signal transcoding sacrifices a small amount of PQ for size).

Something you could try: If you have any high quality 1080 content on disk, put a copy on a USB stick and take it with you to a store. Plug it in to the TV and watch the content on that TV.

Avatar, The Martian, Passengers (2017), Beauty and the Beast (2017) - these have really good picture quality and would give you a reasonable idea of what a 4K panel can offer over an HD panel.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Forgot to mention...

Your current 50" TV could become an immersive 65", 75" or even a little bigger with no perceptible drop in PQ from your viewing distance. I went from a 55" to a 75" and the picture is actually clearer.
 

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As always I am enjoying our discussion - I love learning about this stuff.

Your explanation of upscalling is great. But then I wonder how one would determine a TV with a good upscalling engine. Just by price?

I understand what you are saying about TV size. Because of limitations in our TV room I could squeeze in a 55” but mo more. This is our “sitting room” which is mostly windows and big glass door.

Your idea of taking a USB drive to the store is a great one. However I have no content on media. Also don’t know what a Walmart employee would do if I tried that.

The only place for me to view TVs on display is Walmart. But I don’t really look as I know they pipe content through them on display that is meant to WOW you. Also viewing TVs under flourescent lighting is nothing near what it would look like in the home. So I rely on internet research and pick the brains of people like you.

I will have to look at the Sony TVs you mentioned. I will admit that I have become a Samsung fan after this and my previous TVs. Once I get the dispaly settings like I want I find the quality just great. I now have a barebones 5000 series and was going to go with a 7000 series next. But I have tunnel vision now with Samsung. If nothing else you have prompted me to look at Sony also.
 

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As always I am enjoying our discussion - I love learning about this stuff.

Your explanation of upscalling is great. But then I wonder how one would determine a TV with a good upscalling engine. Just by price?

I understand what you are saying about TV size. Because of limitations in our TV room I could squeeze in a 55” but mo more. This is our “sitting room” which is mostly windows and big glass door.

Your idea of taking a USB drive to the store is a great one. However I have no content on media. Also don’t know what a Walmart employee would do if I tried that.

The only place for me to view TVs on display is Walmart. But I don’t really look as I know they pipe content through them on display that is meant to WOW you. Also viewing TVs under flourescent lighting is nothing near what it would look like in the home. So I rely on internet research and pick the brains of people like you.

I will have to look at the Sony TVs you mentioned. I will admit that I have become a Samsung fan after this and my previous TVs. Once I get the dispaly settings like I want I find the quality just great. I now have a barebones 5000 series and was going to go with a 7000 series next. But I have tunnel vision now with Samsung. If nothing else you have prompted me to look at Sony also.
You definitely can't rate the upscaling capabilities by the price of the panel... Sony has some that are really good and some that are so-so. And they may have similar prices to each other. The upscaling engine in the 800E and 900E are very good. I have a 55" 800E that I watch ripped DVD's (480) on and the PQ is quite good. The rips are lossless, so they are as good as the original DVD. The only device that's "doing anything" with the content is the TV (I stream the files from an in-house media PC using Plex). The PQ is just as good as what I get from my 49" 900E and -almost- as good as what I get from my 75" 940D. This is how I know the upscaling in these sets are all very good.

I have also watched this same content on a 49" Sharp 4K TV and saw similar resolution quality to the Sony's, so those sets (Best Buy only) seem to have very good engines as well even though the price is half that of the Sony 800E of the same size.

With a lot of windows and such, you may find the 800E to have a slightly washed out look during the day because of the type of display panel it uses. The 900E might be better in that situation.

I doubt a Walmart employee would do anything because they seem to never be around anyhow. The thing you would need them for would be to get your hands on the remote so you could launch the movie from the USB stick. As far as having media, I seem to recall from other threads that you do your fair share of tinkering with computers. Download a program called MakeMKV and use it to rip a BluRay that you own to disk. Then copy the movie file to the USB stick. I would -not- try this today, however, because the eval version of MakeMKV is actually not working. It will likely take the author a couple of days to update it so that it's working again (he includes a time-locked eval key with the download, and that key is currently expired).

I agree that the viewing options in box stores can make it tough, especially if you're limited to only one retailer.

I had a Samsung in my kitchen that I put there in 2011. It was a 40", HD, and I added a camera for Skype. It died on me at 14 months, but Samsung offered to replaced the main controller board under warranty (they sent a tech to my house). It continued to operate until April of this year when I got sick of the constant "Smart Hub" updates that would reboot my TV seemingly every other day. I took it down, sold it, moved over to Sony, and haven't looked back.

To each their own, but I'll never own another product from LG or Samsung because I have had multiple bad experiences with products from both companies. It's unfortunate that I have this stance, too, because Samsung TV's are generally a bit less expensive than the Sony models. :)

With regard to settings - they make all the difference in the world. Out of the box, my 940D and 900E had "nice" pictures. But, they weren't tweaked at all. I used someone else's calibrated settings for their 940D as a starting point for mine. I made a few tweaks from there to get a picture that I like. I then used these settings as a starting point for my 900E. Again, a couple of tweaks and I now have a picture I like.

With the 800E, I haven't yet touched the settings. I will, I just don't yet know when. lol

If you go with a set with FALD like the 900E or 940D (last year's model - no longer available), spending a couple hundred more to get the set calibrated in your home is often very much worth it.
 

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Those are some really nice Sony prices, compared to what we paid for our Samsung curved 4K 48" 2 years ago. Ahh, the never ending merry-go-round of technology and price.

Funny thing, we got the TV, and I talked the wife into getting the Samsung (only one at the time) 4K Blu ray player too. Afterall, what's the sense of a 4K TV without a 4K player...........Right?!

Well, we STILL haven't watched anything in 4K yet!:hide::unknown:
 

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Those are some really nice Sony prices, compared to what we paid for our Samsung curved 4K 48" 2 years ago. Ahh, the never ending merry-go-round of technology and price.

Funny thing, we got the TV, and I talked the wife into getting the Samsung (only one at the time) 4K Blu ray player too. Afterall, what's the sense of a 4K TV without a 4K player...........Right?!

Well, we STILL haven't watched anything in 4K yet!:hide::unknown:
lol... I hear ya. I don't have a lot of 4K content that I own. Prices are still way to high on the media itself for me to consider buying it outright yet.
 

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Right now, Sony has some good price drops on a couple of their well-appointed, 4K televisions. For the 2017 model year, they have a couple of TV 'families' that are really nice. The 800E and 900E models offer a lot of excellent features and excellent picture quality while not literally requiring a second mortgage on your home to buy. They have also instituted some price drops that make these particular sets really good values for what you get. The 800E family offers 4K, HDR, Edge lit LED with Frame Dimming and Sony's Tri-Luminous Display processing. The picture quality on these sets is really nice - I have one. The 900E family offers everything that the 800E family has except that it's a direct lit FALD set (Full Array, Local Dimming) which gives the best backlighting and overall PQ. It also has the X1 processor (which means it -may- qualify to get the Dolby Vision update). Picture quality on these sets is excellent - I have one. Current pricing on the 55" model in both families makes them excellent overall values with the 800E being $800 and the 900E being $1000. While these prices will be a bit shocking to some, and understandably so, they are some of the best prices I've seen on sets with really high quality 4K / HDR panels. And if you want a much larger screen, the 65" or 75" 900E would give my 940D a run for the money, and their prices are considerably less than I paid for the 940D. Anyway... If you're in the market for a really nice TV that's a bit on the larger side, check out these 55" models before Sony pulls the sale prices.
I read through this thread and am posing my response and questions on the original post just out of convenience. Clearly, you are knowledgeable about TV's and are interested in their technology and the never ending changes. Since I am having trouble with this site and can't edit, can't format my post, etc., I will separate the questions with ........................................................1.- Do you have a preference in the retailer for purchasing a Sony TV? If so, who and why?..................................................2. - What is your opinion on the extended warranties offered and do you purchase an extended warranty? If yes, is it the CostCo one you mentioned?...........................................................3.- How often do you upgrade your TV's and what do you do with the one being replaced, put it in another room in your home or other?.............................................4.- Based upon the new technology, how long do you think a new TV set should last?................................................5.- Do you replace or upgrade your TV sets based upon the availability of new technology or simply when the prior TV set dies and isn't realistic / cost effective to repair?....................................Thank you very much for your replies. I appreciate your interest and depth of knowledge in this technology.
 

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I read through this thread and am posing my response and questions on the original post just out of convenience. Clearly, you are knowledgeable about TV's and are interested in their technology and the never ending changes. Since I am having trouble with this site and can't edit, can't format my post, etc., I will separate the questions with ........................................................1.- Do you have a preference in the retailer for purchasing a Sony TV? If so, who and why?..................................................2. - What is your opinion on the extended warranties offered and do you purchase an extended warranty? If yes, is it the CostCo one you mentioned?...........................................................3.- How often do you upgrade your TV's and what do you do with the one being replaced, put it in another room in your home or other?.............................................4.- Based upon the new technology, how long do you think a new TV set should last?................................................5.- Do you replace or upgrade your TV sets based upon the availability of new technology or simply when the prior TV set dies and isn't realistic / cost effective to repair?....................................Thank you very much for your replies. I appreciate your interest and depth of knowledge in this technology.
Something is definitely up with this site - I can't edit posts, but it seems I can lay out the text when posting so that it's somewhat formatted.

I appreciate the comments about being knowledgeable, but what I know is that which I have learned through my own research and asking lots of questions of those much smarter than I am. I still have plenty to learn. :)

1.- Do you have a preference in the retailer for purchasing a Sony TV? If so, who and why?

For Sony, the prices are basically set by Sony. You may see very, very slight savings at a particular retailer over another, but generally everyone charges the same. With that in mind, I'd say work with whomever you're comfortable with. Very few places carry Sony "on the floor" any more, so there's a reasonable chance you'll be dealing with a box store or having it shipped. One thing to consider when buying is that Amazon does NOT price match after the sale any longer. So, if you buy it and Sony drops the price a week later, you're out of luck. Working with a more local entity may be worth it here unless you're buying at the very beginning of the model year (when prices DON'T drop), or you know you're getting a really good price no matter.

I have purchased all three of my current Sony TV's from Best Buy for no reason other than they are local and convenient. It turned out to benefit me when I needed to purchase other items as the store manager knows who I am and has been helpful with other things that I wouldn't otherwise have gotten the time of day from them on.

2. - What is your opinion on the extended warranties offered and do you purchase an extended warranty? If yes, is it the CostCo one you mentioned?

Extended warranties are largely a complete waste of money and I do not buy them. When it's "too cheap NOT to buy", I'll give it a much closer look. My 940D was close to $4000. So, a $90 warranty for three extra years made perfect sense to me. SquareTrade seems to be the most "no hassle" of the coverage options, and buying the plan from Costco is absolutely the least expensive option to get it (and for what you get). Costco's option is three EXTRA years whereas buying it elsewhere (for more money) is for three years total.

I can count on one hand the number of things I have ever purchased an extended warranty on, and almost all of them are mechanical items that wear with use (washing machine, dryer, treadmill).

If you have money to spend on an extended warranty for electronics, MOST of the time you are better off investing that money into a quality UPS (battery backup) device to isolate all electrical faults from the device. Your device will last longer by running on conditioned power, too.

3.- How often do you upgrade your TV's and what do you do with the one being replaced, put it in another room in your home or other?

I bought a 52" Sony LCD in 2007. It was my only TV. When I bought my house, I upgraded that set to a 55" and moved the 52" to the bedroom. I bought a new 40" for the kitchen. Things stayed that way for quite a while, then the 55" died. I replaced that one with a 75" Sony.

I loved the 75" so much, I replaced the 40" in the kitchen with a 49" Sony. The 40" that I took down got sold on Craigslist.

I needed another TV in the house, so I bought the 55" Sony.

As you can see, I don't really "upgrade" that much. All of the TV purchases, except two, were for non-upgrade reasons. And, I didn't count the three other TV's in the house that are in the play room and kids' rooms. :)

4.- Based upon the new technology, how long do you think a new TV set should last?

From a longevity standpoint, I expect to be able to get 10 years or more out of a television. This is due, in part, to my using UPS devices that filter out all noise and such and ensure that there's NO WAY for spikes to hit my devices on any connector and it also protects fully from "brownouts" or sags in electrical supply.

5.- Do you replace or upgrade your TV sets based upon the availability of new technology or simply when the prior TV set dies and isn't realistic / cost effective to repair?

As mentioned, I don't really upgrade. I typically replace. New technology doesn't necessarily excite me because it always comes at such a high price. And, while I did spend a considerable amount on my primary TV, that was because I was in a situation of "must replace" and opted to just go ahead and buy big.

Hope that helps.
 

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Coaltrain, I agree the cost is prohibitive just to upgrade, however if you are looking for a new/additional TV, then I believe the 4k option is well worth it.

Back 10 years ago when I bought my 50" plasma, 1080p was just becoming the rage, like 4k is now.
I had nothing that supported it, so went with the 720p TV.
I don't regret it, still has a great picture, but nothing compared to what the new ones are.
I won't replace it until it dies, however, I'm shopping for a new 65" TV for the basement, so I'll take a look at these for sure.
65" is $1499.99 at best buy.

I had my eye on the LG 65UJ6300, which I'm sure is a step down from the Sony, but also almost half price at $799.99 on sale.

Go look at them tonight.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Coaltrain, I agree the cost is prohibitive just to upgrade, however if you are looking for a new/additional TV, then I believe the 4k option is well worth it.

Back 10 years ago when I bought my 50" plasma, 1080p was just becoming the rage, like 4k is now.
I had nothing that supported it, so went with the 720p TV.
I don't regret it, still has a great picture, but nothing compared to what the new ones are.
I won't replace it until it dies, however, I'm shopping for a new 65" TV for the basement, so I'll take a look at these for sure.
65" is $1499.99 at best buy.

I had my eye on the LG 65UJ6300, which I'm sure is a step down from the Sony, but also almost half price at $799.99 on sale.

Go look at them tonight.
The 65" Sony 900E is an awesome TV. I agree that it's a big jump in price, but it's also in a different bracket in terms of capabilities. The biggest area where the 900E will outperform the LG set is that the Sony is FALD. The screen area is broken down into "zones" and each zone has its own backlighting and it's independently controlled from the rest of the set. This gives the ability to have very dark and very bright images on the screen at the same time and have each area look "correct" for color and brightness. Think along the lines of someone being in a basement or cave or something and everything is very dark. But then there's an area on screen where they're looking out a window to the outside and it's sunny. The FALD set can more accurately represent all of those colors and brightness levels while a non-FALD set has to "average them out." So the bright areas are a little dimmer than they should be and the dark areas might have a little bit of gray color instead of pure black.
 

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The 65" Sony 900E is an awesome TV. I agree that it's a big jump in price, but it's also in a different bracket in terms of capabilities. The biggest area where the 900E will outperform the LG set is that the Sony is FALD. The screen area is broken down into "zones" and each zone has its own backlighting and it's independently controlled from the rest of the set. This gives the ability to have very dark and very bright images on the screen at the same time and have each area look "correct" for color and brightness. Think along the lines of someone being in a basement or cave or something and everything is very dark. But then there's an area on screen where they're looking out a window to the outside and it's sunny. The FALD set can more accurately represent all of those colors and brightness levels while a non-FALD set has to "average them out." So the bright areas are a little dimmer than they should be and the dark areas might have a little bit of gray color instead of pure black.
Yeah, I've read that's the biggest gripe about the LG, the blacks aren't true "black" but greyish, and it's better in a light room than a dark room.
However, it also is applauded for it's viewability from side angles, where some of the higher quality sets fall short in this area.
Where it will be positioned, the main viewing seats will be ~ 12-14 feet away at less than 45* angles.
However, the kids play area, the dart board, and the bar area are all off to the side and would be at a greater viewing angle from straight on, so it's something I have to see in person to judge how much it will affect viewing.
 

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Yeah, I've read that's the biggest gripe about the LG, the blacks aren't true "black" but greyish, and it's better in a light room than a dark room.
However, it also is applauded for it's viewability from side angles, where some of the higher quality sets fall short in this area.
Where it will be positioned, the main viewing seats will be ~ 12-14 feet away at less than 45* angles.
However, the kids play area, the dart board, and the bar area are all off to the side and would be at a greater viewing angle from straight on, so it's something I have to see in person to judge how much it will affect viewing.
The 900E uses a VA panel which has a drop-off in quality when viewing from an angle. It's possible that the LG is also using a VA panel. The Sony 800E uses a IPS panel which is better to view from an angle.

I can tell you from my own personal use that the VA panel on the 900E does not seem to be a detractor for me as that set is NEVER viewed straight on (it's up on the wall at eye level and positioned so that sitting at the table makes you look at it at an angle). This set is in my kitchen and is often viewed while you're moving around. I don't really notice any significant changes to the PQ while moving around and looking at the screen.
 

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Coaltrain, I agree the cost is prohibitive just to upgrade, however if you are looking for a new/additional TV, then I believe the 4k option is well worth it.

Back 10 years ago when I bought my 50" plasma, 1080p was just becoming the rage, like 4k is now.
I had nothing that supported it, so went with the 720p TV.
I don't regret it, still has a great picture, but nothing compared to what the new ones are.
I won't replace it until it dies, however, I'm shopping for a new 65" TV for the basement, so I'll take a look at these for sure.
65" is $1499.99 at best buy.

I had my eye on the LG 65UJ6300, which I'm sure is a step down from the Sony, but also almost half price at $799.99 on sale.

Go look at them tonight.
I agree with you. If I needed to replace a TV right now I would likely go with a 4k set. Wow - showing my age - when was the last time a TV was called a TV set?

Anyway, I would do that if for nothing else to possibly future proof myself somewhat. Also, the price between a 1080p amd a 4k TV right now is negligible.

meburdick - I did a bit more reading today - your comment about Samsung being brighter is true. I read about that on a couple review sites.

Even on a day like today with heavily overcast skies, the room is so bright that we have to close 1/2 the blinds if we want to watch something during the day. I think this is why our Samsung TV works so well for us.

My first flat panel TV a few years ago was an LG 1080p 38” (it may even be a 720p). The TV has very nice color but could never get the “pop” out of it. When I got the Samsung I was awed. And that was after tuning it to my likes and not on the enhanced dramatic setting. So the stronger brightness does work for my setup.
 

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I agree with you. If I needed to replace a TV right now I would likely go with a 4k set. Wow - showing my age - when was the last time a TV was called a TV set?

Anyway, I would do that if for nothing else to possibly future proof myself somewhat. Also, the price between a 1080p amd a 4k TV right now is negligible.

meburdick - I did a bit more reading today - your comment about Samsung being brighter is true. I read about that on a couple review sites.

Even on a day like today with heavily overcast skies, the room is so bright that we have to close 1/2 the blinds if we want to watch something during the day. I think this is why our Samsung TV works so well for us.

My first flat panel TV a few years ago was an LG 1080p 38” (it may even be a 720p). The TV has very nice color but could never get the “pop” out of it. When I got the Samsung I was awed. And that was after tuning it to my likes and not on the enhanced dramatic setting. So the stronger brightness does work for my setup.
Hmmm. Don't recall the comment about brightness on Samsung specifically, but maybe it was an inferred one.

I have to take back something I has posited earlier... The 800E actually performs better in rooms with some light than it does in very dark settings. The 900E is more susceptible to glare. So, for brighter rooms, the 800E is probably the better choice overall and for dark rooms, the 900E will be able really show its abilities.
 

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A lot of great info in this thread thanks guys. My wife has been busting my stones about my Panasonic 50" plasma that I bought in 2008 for $1050 when BB was selling them for $2400. TV has been phenomenal and still has true black. Downside is it's brightness and vivid-ness isn't impressive anymore. I personally mounted my plasma above my fire place mantle and used a scissor style articulating mount that tilts to support my 100lbs beast. It is rated for a 150lbs tv at full extension of nearly 18". Nothing like 5/8"x 6" spring toggled to provide a little support :thumbup1gif:

As far as LG televisions I know more than one person that is very unimpressed with their televisions as well as the rest of their home products such as fridges, dishwashers etc. Greatest complaint when they fail, which they do, is their poor customer service.

Any of you guys have someone calibrate the tv for you or are you just using factory settings?
 
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