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So I've been out for awhile, was gone at Annual Training for the Guard.

Spent 2 weeks "camping" in the field, I got to play OPFOR (enemy forces) this time for an Engineer BN.
Good time overall, and a lot of lessons learned for the line units!

The views were awesome, but I am thankful to be able to not put on damp clothes again!
 

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And then since I either think I have too much free time, or am a glutton for punishment (not sure yet) we picked up a welcome home gift for me last weekend.

Deutsch Drahthaar, 10 weeks old. This is gonna be fun!
 

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Wyoming???


So I've been out for awhile, was gone at Annual Training for the Guard.

Spent 2 weeks "camping" in the field, I got to play OPFOR (enemy forces) this time for an Engineer BN.
Good time overall, and a lot of lessons learned for the line units!

The views were awesome, but I am thankful to be able to not put on damp clothes again!
 

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Welcome back ,, and Thanks for your service.
 

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So I've been out for awhile, was gone at Annual Training for the Guard.

Spent 2 weeks "camping" in the field, I got to play OPFOR (enemy forces) this time for an Engineer BN.
Good time overall, and a lot of lessons learned for the line units!

The views were awesome, but I am thankful to be able to not put on damp clothes again!
Ahh OPFOR.

I got to spend 6 years playing OPFOR at CMTC Hohenfels I guess it is now called JMRC Hohenfels.

It was like this :rocket:

but with pew pew lazers.

1-4 Infantry Battalion a force to be reckoned with The United States Army
 

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Ahh OPFOR.

I got to spend 6 years playing OPFOR at CMTC Hohenfels I guess it is now called JMRC Hohenfels.

It was like this :rocket:

but with pew pew lazers.

1-4 Infantry Battalion a force to be reckoned with The United States Army
We had blanks and sims...

Enemy forces were supposed to be "4-8 man teams"
There were only 4 of us playing, we went through over 2500 blank rounds of 5.56, about 10 starclusters (had to quit using due to fire danger), 50+ grenade sims, 75+ arty sims, and ~25 smoke grenades (indicating gas/CBRNE attack)
It was good times!
 

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Sounds like fun to me. AT was always an enjoyable time regardless of rank. I enjoyed it (I know I'm a bit warped, but it was always a learning experience).

Cutty, thanks for being a Soldier.:usa
 

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We had blanks and sims...

Enemy forces were supposed to be "4-8 man teams"
There were only 4 of us playing, we went through over 2500 blank rounds of 5.56, about 10 starclusters (had to quit using due to fire danger), 50+ grenade sims, 75+ arty sims, and ~25 smoke grenades (indicating gas/CBRNE attack)
It was good times!
Since our training area was set up for it we would use blanks and MILES. Vehicle MILES all had GPS and would transmit location and what we were doing (firing at something or getting hit by someone) to antennas around the training area which would relay back to a command center for the Generals to watch the battlefield in real time. They could also use this same system to transmit kill or near miss for Artillery attacks. Of course that would also mean we would call for artillary and if it would be too effective, they would overrule our call and say the battery is down so we don't wipe them out with one well placed fire mission. Most of the time if on the ground in small teams we would use the traditional MILES which was just laser sensors without GPS location. However, when doing recon patrols they would normally make at least one of the team wear MILES II which had GPS data much like the vehicles which of course added about 20# of crap to your mission loadout.

It was fun to get paid to play lasertag with all kinds of cool equipment. We had a lot of free reign not normally seen in the Army and it was an amazing experience. Pretty much all our hummers were fitted with seats from S Class Mercedes, we would add IR Driving lights like old school KC lights. Turn them into technicals by mounting M2s in the back or other guns in various gun mounts all over the place. Also since we replicated one unit higher (a platoon had 15 M113A2s replicating a company) but still with only 30 soldiers, that meant you could be a PFC and find yourself a Track Commander with a PVT as a driver. In most mechanized units they would have 4 vehicles per platoon and you would be lucky to have TC time if you were the most Sr SSG in the Platoon.
 

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Sounds like fun to me. AT was always an enjoyable time regardless of rank. I enjoyed it (I know I'm a bit warped, but it was always a learning experience).

Cutty, thanks for being a Soldier.:usa
My honor, and I enjoy (most) ATs too. Great training, and time to bond with your comrades.

Since our training area was set up for it we would use blanks and MILES. Vehicle MILES all had GPS and would transmit location and what we were doing (firing at something or getting hit by someone) to antennas around the training area which would relay back to a command center for the Generals to watch the battlefield in real time. They could also use this same system to transmit kill or near miss for Artillery attacks. Of course that would also mean we would call for artillary and if it would be too effective, they would overrule our call and say the battery is down so we don't wipe them out with one well placed fire mission. Most of the time if on the ground in small teams we would use the traditional MILES which was just laser sensors without GPS location. However, when doing recon patrols they would normally make at least one of the team wear MILES II which had GPS data much like the vehicles which of course added about 20# of crap to your mission loadout.

It was fun to get paid to play lasertag with all kinds of cool equipment. We had a lot of free reign not normally seen in the Army and it was an amazing experience. Pretty much all our hummers were fitted with seats from S Class Mercedes, we would add IR Driving lights like old school KC lights. Turn them into technicals by mounting M2s in the back or other guns in various gun mounts all over the place. Also since we replicated one unit higher (a platoon had 15 M113A2s replicating a company) but still with only 30 soldiers, that meant you could be a PFC and find yourself a Track Commander with a PVT as a driver. In most mechanized units they would have 4 vehicles per platoon and you would be lucky to have TC time if you were the most Sr SSG in the Platoon.
That sounds pretty cool!
 

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You're a good man for serving our country, Thank You.

I spent a miserable rainy night in a leaky tent in that area in mid August 1981, shortly before beginning my Senior year of college in South Dakota.

I'm very fond of Wyoming and miss the scenery there,

Brian

Correct, nice work.

Guernsey to be precise.

Water crossing was Glendo Reservoir.
 

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Used to be a Combat Engineer myself, 2001-2007. Miss those summer camps! After a couple years in the desert, the summer camps became more enjoyable. What engineers did you get to play with???
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Used to be a Combat Engineer myself, 2001-2007. Miss those summer camps! After a couple years in the desert, the summer camps became more enjoyable. What engineers did you get to play with???
Our state EN BN, the 164th EN.
So, H element, FSC (maintenance), a Multi Role Bridge Company (MRBC), and 2 Sapper Companies.
It was a good time.
 
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