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Discussion Starter #1
I have spots I need to level after backhoeing or rototilling with a JD3320 485 backhoe or jd655 tiller.What 3pt hitch implement does it the easiest?I tried dragging the front bucket backwards but it leaves too much work by hand. I am considering a box blade,a rear blade with attachable sides,or small drag harrow.I am new at this and learning with my new jd3320.I have a 485 backhoe,655 tiller,72" autoconnect belly mower ,imatch hitch,tow hitch,heavyduty front loader and 61"hdbucket.I am also interested in a mound maker for planting in the future(everything attachments cultivator with furrow attachment?).I have some need of snow/ice removal about 3x per year up to one to 1 1/2 feet high.I have a clinic concrete parking lot(10 car) and a short triple concrete/asphalt driveway at home.I am not sure if the front bucket would be that efficient or whether it would scar up my concrete.It would also be nice if I can clear the country street that I live on that includes two hills.I am not sure if it would be worth it to get a snow removal attachment with as little snow as I have.Another concern was for a spreader, either broadcast or pendular for fertilizer,seeds,insecticides,maybe salt for ice. I was also considering a plow(double or single bottom)to help bring up the rocks and turn the soil before rototilling.And lastly was considering the best way to water crops for a large 1/2-1 acre garden,berry bushes/vines and an apple orchard that I will be planting(is it better to have a water tank with sprayer for 3pt hitch or try to set up a sprinkler system that is timed(i would need to trench water lines to areas for water). I have 3.2 acres fairly level clay rocky soil in southwest Missouri.
 

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A box blade is the single most useful tool IMO.
 

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The box blade is a good all around tool too have and it can do rough leveling.
I think you're better off with sprinkler for watering. A basic sprayer might be nice for the insecticides. I also like having a broadcast spreader... They aren't expensive and like you mention you can use them for seed, fertilizer, lime, etc...
 

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Gotta go with the box blade, except for pushing snow.
With the white slop, just use the bucket and either get good at feeling the bite, or pop for a used back blade on the cheap.

Snow throwers are great if you use them often enough, and get a good and heavy untit that dosn't mind the occaisional rock, or tree limb.

On the spreader, see if your local ag supply outfit rents the things.
Odds are you are going to be buying the Fert in bulk and mixed for your needs, based on soil and tissue samples, so it's a no brainer to use thier spreader, and just tow the thing filled. Beats filling from a gravity box by shovel or off the flatbed trailer.

Ya don't want the headaches of spreading chloride with your fertilizer spreader.
They never get cleaned after use, because lets face it, it's freezing out. Which leads to your spreader getting eaten, and no end of headaches.
Save that for one ya find at an auction for 50 bucks, and just needs some tin work after evicting the mice.

Watering? Umm...no.
You don't want to water from a spray tank on the 3pt.
It would take forever, and you never would be able to keep up.

On the cheap, look into drip irrigation from a well.

Lay everything out and plant, so that a single trunk line can supply everything.
Lines in the garden for annuals, will need to be pulled up and stored in the off season.
With 2-3' leaders from the trunk line, you just slip on a Figure 8 to shut them off, or add a connector and lay out the line for the row.

Drip gives you the flexibility to run different "Zones", on a multi zone programmable timer, and utilize drip lines with a flow rate and emitter spacing, that is optimum for each crop.
No point in drowning your trees, just because the Dadgum 'maters need water like crazy.;)

With the proper set up, you can Fertilize through the drip line, and chemigate if needed, especially the orchard.
Biggest advantages are little loss to evaporation, and a LOT fewer issues with fungus. Nothing is more irritating than having to spray fungicides constantly, because the sprinklers are running no stop in a dry year. Cost difference vs. a fixed overhead sprinkler system is about 1/3. You can match your well capacity, by setting up zones and rate of delivery to match output. 15psi is all that is needed at the emitters, so the flexibility is there in spades.

The disadvantages are that every thirsty critter in the county, will know where to get a drink if they bite the drip line, and it can be a bit of work keeping up on dry years. Splice connectors run 50 cents each, and can add up.You also have to remember not to hit the lines with the tiller, and keep a folding razor knife on the tractor, because the darn things are sneaky about hiding.

Here's a link to one of the outfits we use for ideas.Jain Irrigation Systems Ltd.
Check with your local Orchard supply/irrigation supply outfit and see what they carry as well. Most times, they will help lay out and design for your needs , and having local support can be darn important.

You're gonna need an orchard/blast sprayer one way or the other, and if you shop around, there are models that will work with annuals as well as the trees and bushes.

A good tank sprayer, that can be switched between boom and spot spraying is handy.
Don't go cheap and pay more in the long run though, and always consider fabricating to fit your own needs.

Good luck, and as always, PICS!!
For some reason, yours aren't coming up.:lol:
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thank you toddM and Lebneh for your suggestions,and Dingeryote for your detailed suggestions.I will try to get a boxblade first.I will also study sprinkler systems more regarding drip irrigation.Are there any favorite brands of box blades out there,maybe 65" wide,that you are very pleased with(and why you think their quality is good).I have been thinking about Everything Attachments professiional quality 65" boxblade(along with some of their other implements in the future).Are they easy to work with...any experiences?
 

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You will get all kinds of advice on which box blade so I will give you mine. Don't get one wider than your rear tires because a 3320 sometimes doesn't have the HP or weight to pull full loads of heavy material up an incline, it will break traction. I bought a cheap one, County Line at TSC and hung some weights on it for more ballast during loader work. I have worked it like a dog and it has been more than adequate. It weighs about 450#..... Good luck.

I would also add that the hydraulic top link is a must have if you will be using the box blade a lot.
 

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Like Todd said get one about as wide as your rears. I also have a "standard" duty from tractor supply (I believe they have a a heavy duty version). I've used it very hard. Broke a couple teeth (tractor supply let me exchange) and I picked up an extra one. I'm happy with mine.
 

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I have a cabbed 3320 and I would agree that a box blade will probably work best. As some of the guys said, don't get one wider than your rear tires. I've got a 60" King Kutter box blade and I can tell when I'm pulling a full load. Anything bigger than a 60" will be a waste of money. The 3320 doesn't have enough weight to give you the needed traction. A landscape rake has it's uses on loose of fairly loose material. I own both and have found uses for both regarding building and maintaining my trails, dirt road, and dirt/gravel driveway. I've got a bunch of King Kutter attachments for my tractor. I love them. They are well built and reasonably priced.
 
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