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Artillian Tractor, LLC
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Using my 46 hoe on our loamy topsoil has been amusing as the stabilizer feet just keep sinking in deeper and deeper as though there weren't any feet on there at all. (You can see by the amount of dirt on the cylinders and outrigger arms in the photos).

I am working on an improved design as I just can't use this hoe this way. I came across some C6 channel and thought I'd take a whack at making some. I think I'm going to try some C7 or C8 channel as these still sank in somewhat (but not nearly as badly as the OEM's). But at least the claws are no longer on the ends anymore. That's a major improvement alone.

These prototype feet aren't finished as they would still be chamfered at the ends and painted, of course, but I thought I would share what I have to date. Once I get the size down, I might try to make the design a bit more interesting with some yet-to-be-thought-of feature, but we'll see. For the moment, I'd just like to get the hoe functional/useable.

Sorry for the lousy photos.
 

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Everyone hates the agony of da feet. It's a sinking feeling indeed when your equipment doesn't cover the ground you think it should. I'm glad to see you're channeling your efforts and taking a stand towards a solution. Your efforts will find you landing with both feet firmly on terra not so firma.

Ok enough of that nonsense....:nunu:

I've seen my outriggers slide left to right sometimes. Not as likely in your soft loam as it is on our hard clay. But if you've got the surface area looking good, I'd consider a cross piece in the middle so things can't slide around too easily. This would also cover when you're digging parallel with a slope and all the vibration and movement tend to make the unit want to slide downhill. You might even want to cap the ends, kinda like a lot of the outrigger feet out there.

Another thing I'd consider is holes in the top of the channel so you can drive a piece of 1/2" rebar in there if you really need to anchor things. It would also help when it was time to push out the dirt trapped in the foot.

I do like your fabrication skills and ingenuity :thumbup1gif:!

Pete
 

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Looks great Chris! Another product for Artillian in the making-thanks for sharing:good2:
 

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Artillian Tractor, LLC
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Everyone hates the agony of da feet. It's a sinking feeling indeed when your equipment doesn't cover the ground you think it should. I'm glad to see you're channeling your efforts and taking a stand towards a solution. Your efforts will find you landing with both feet firmly on terra not so firma.

Ok enough of that nonsense....:nunu:
I love it. That's great stuff!

I've seen my outriggers slide left to right sometimes. Not as likely in your soft loam as it is on our hard clay. But if you've got the surface area looking good, I'd consider a cross piece in the middle so things can't slide around too easily. This would also cover when you're digging parallel with a slope and all the vibration and movement tend to make the unit want to slide downhill. You might even want to cap the ends, kinda like a lot of the outrigger feet out there.

Another thing I'd consider is holes in the top of the channel so you can drive a piece of 1/2" rebar in there if you really need to anchor things. It would also help when it was time to push out the dirt trapped in the foot.

I do like your fabrication skills and ingenuity :thumbup1gif:!

Pete
Thanks for the mentions everyone. I wasn't setting out to create a new product from this, though it would certainly make sense if it could help other people.

Pete, one of the reasons for making these was to eliminate the portions of the JD feet that keep them from sliding side to side (lateral movement). I only want them to resist the effort of the backhoe (longitudinal movement). The feet on my 260 hoe were made like this and they were a pleasure to use on a lawn. I barely left a mark with them. With the stock 46 feet, they just destroy anything in a 12-18" diameter, mainly by dragging across the ground when dropping the stabilizers.

I can imagine that the stock JD feet probably work great when digging in clay or other hard soil settings.

This gives me the idea of having a set of feet for a variety of working surfaces, soft soil, hard soil, pavement, etc. It is very easy to remove the feet and switch them out. Why not have the best of all worlds?
 

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Artillian Tractor, LLC
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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Hey Folks,

I finally managed to squeeze in "Rev 2" of the replacement feet for the 46 hoe. The first version worked ok, but still weren't ideal on my soft loamy soil so I decided to go larger. Here are a couple of crude photos taken shortly after welding. In the first photo, you can see the original feet from JD (Bleck!), then the first attempt in the middle, and the new one's on the right.

For whatever it's worth, I think they look awesome on the machine. The backhoe now looks like it's ready for anything, if that makes any sense. I'll try to get some better photos asap and will be testing them out in the next few days but I am pretty sure they are going to do the trick.
 

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Great job Chris:thumbup1gif:
 

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:good2::thumbup1gif::good2::thumbup1gif:
 

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What I'm taking away from this thread is that different soils need different feet, both in area and "roughness". Nice looking fabrication :thumbup1gif:!

Could you put a hole in the foot where you could bolt on another piece of metal to control sideways skidding? Those feet look great for your loam (big area, won't tear it up) but would side all over the place on my clay. I'm thinking it would be easier to bolt on a "claw" than to pull the pin on the foot to flip it over or put on a new foot. It would be cheaper too- just the cost of the add on piece and drilling another hole.

Pete
 

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Artillian Tractor, LLC
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks Gents!

Pete, these photos of the feet were 'hot off the press' and it was 10pm or so when I snapped what I had before killing the lights for the night. I am planning to add some holes so that a pad could be bolted in, or whatever else might make sense.

In your case, it sounds like the stock JD feet work well. Do you think there would be any use for larger feet in your clay, assuming they had the lateral add-on clips you describe? I am curious because I wonder if I'm sort of alone on being dissatisfied with the stock feet (other than one or two forum threads I've seen). With my experiences so far with the stock feet, I can't believe the villagers aren't storming the castle.

You actually read my mind regarding the different sizes. I'm going to keep the first-round middle sized one's for the time being in case I discover a need for them.
 

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... Do you think there would be any use for larger feet in your clay, assuming they had the lateral add-on clips you describe?...
With clay the surface area is rarely the issue, it's "digging in" that's the problem. I see the add-on clips as reducing the surface area so that the feet can dig in. So in a "one size fits all" quest, big feet with add-on clips give you either large surface area for soft surfaces (no clips), or low surface area that digs in for clay (with clips).

Seems like digging the first 4 inches is always the problem because you have no ground for the backside of the bucket to push against. It all comes down to traction on the ground from the feet and bucket vs. "pull" needed to break the ground.

With the holes in the feet, I could even see driving a piece of rebar through the holes to get the first pass done on a 6 to 8 foot section.

The key is to make adding the clip-ons easier than taking off and reversing the feet (for outriggers with reversible feet).

Pete
 

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Artillian Tractor, LLC
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks Pete. The approach that occurs to me would be to use the JD feet in clay / hard soils and use something like my "duck feet" on loam / soft soils. By replacing one cotter pin on each pivot pin with a hair pin cotter, one could easily switch back and forth. Alternatively, some cross ribs could be added to my stabilizer feet as you describe. I was also thinking about some sort of spike, or as you mention, rebar.

Anyway, I did finally get the chance to run the new feet through their paces today. At the same time, I mounted my Brotek Claw and put it and the Brotek Thumb through some trials too. What a great day!

The feet worked PERFECTLY, as you can see. I am so thrilled to have them. Plus, the Brotek Thumb and Ripper are much more useful on the 46 than they were on the 260/2305. I'm much happier with the 46 backhoe now. With the new feet on there and not sinking in, I actually pulled the front end of the tractor right up in the air while working on an old stump with the ripper. That was quite a surprise.
 

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Nice pictures Chris:drinks:
 
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