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Discussion Starter #1
You can find the industrial rated devices here Products and the non-industrial or recreational rated devices here Products

How many of you use these devices on your tractors? I know they have been mentioned before and I believe I have seen some on peoples tractors in pictures. I would guess that you should have two of them for both directions.

If you have one do you use the recreational or the industrial devices?

Do you use two of them or just one of them?

What is a good rule of thumb with regards to what degree is safest and where do you approach roll over? I am assuming that has a lot to do with the particular tractor, what kind of width you have on your rims and where the center of gravity is on that particular tractor. Do the manufacturers publish anything for each tractor? Of course maybe there is a rule of thumb that one could go by if one were to use an inclinometer.
 

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I have one, only because it was given to me by R&B to review-it was their first lighted model. Some pics here: https://plus.google.com/photos/113966569709555812037/albums/5391497438804474033?banner=pwa


Would I buy one? No. I never look at it, when I am on a slop or angle I am more concerned about my surrounding than the meter reading. There are no published specs anyway, so you still must rely on the seat-of-your-pants feeling anyway.

Make me an offer if you want it...
 

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I have the Off Highway version on my tractor and in my Jeep. From offroading with the Jeep I know what a poor gauge the seat of my pants is. Today I was cleaning the snow that we got last night (almost 10 inches), and I was driving over some snow piles and my pants indicated "Danger". I looked at the gauge and realized I was only at 15º, and that with the rear tires only!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Hudsoner, Do you really use it? I realize you looked at it with your jeep in the snow. If so how do you know at what * you are close to tipping over?

That is my whole question, it would be great if you knew at what * your tractor would tip over but I got the feeling that without that info it is just something to look at although Kenny says he does not even look at it or think to look at it.

It seems to me that the only way to figure out at what * your tractor will tip over is to test it for your tractor and its present setup but I don't know who would want to do that. I am under the impression that it is just something to have and look at and comment on. The best thing I can see in having 2 of them is to determine if your tractor is level or not when checking fluids etc or getting ready to change fluids. If you have it set up parallel with your tractor in the long dimension you could look at the incline or decline which you are on. Maybe some others will pipe up and add their 2 cents worth at some point.

Thanks for the input.
 

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@robpm
I do not know what the tipping angle wood be, but I remember that I read that it is generally about 35º (my Jeep is close to 45º). As I wrote, I had a tipsy feeling at a little over 15º. Looking at the gauge ensured me that I was still far away from really tipping, and I relaxed for the rest of the work.
 

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There is no set tip over angle. Too many variables like operator weight, fuel level, implement weight and location, what you're doing with said implement, loaded tires, tire type, and including tire pressure. I personally wouldn't rely on a imaginary "red line" on a gauge. Just for fun and info, maybe. For certain implements and jobs, sure. But never as a dead on reliable safety indicator.


Just my .00000002 cents.:bye2:
 

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I have the R & B MODEL# 25CDA Boom Angle Indicators | Tilt Meter | The R&B Manufacturing, Inc. dual axis inclinometer. The side to side works great; but the fore & aft is as worthless as tits on a log as it isn't fluid dampened and vibrates too much to be useful. I modified mine to be fluid dampened with glycerin, and although better, it's still not worth a crap. If you want a dual axis model, get two single axis units and mount them so they measure both directions.

Do I rely solely on the inclinometer? No, it is a tool to help you judge whether or not you're getting too close to the tipping point. But the ultimate inclinometer is that 3-pounds of gray gelatinous goo between your ears.

As others have said, there are way too many variables to make a blanket statement as to what's safe and what isn't. R & B probably chose the yellow and red zones arbitrarily based on the designer's pucker factor.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
It is clear to me that these are a nice thing to have and it is nice to be able to see the angle or degrees but at the end of the day with all the variables it comes ultimately down to what you think or feel may be time to change the situation before you ultimately go over. So for the time being I think that I will save my money. Kenny sorry but I am not going to make you an offer:empathy::laugh:
 

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A couple of years ago I was mowing along my provincial road with a Craftsman garden tractor on the flat shoulder when the right front wheel left the shoulder and over she went into a ditch. There was no slope, just a drop off that couldn't be seen as the grass had grown up and disguised it. I didn't have time to stop or reverse the tractor, just enough time to disengage the mower as I was going over. The drop off was about six feet deep and the tractor landed upside down and banged my leg on the way over. I have a goose egg on my thigh to this day to remind me. There was no seatbelt on the garden tractor.

I have an inclinometer mounted on my 2720 to indicate side to side angle. When mowing with my 62D MMM and tires unloaded but set to the wide position, things start feeling unstable at 15 deg. and very dicey between 20 and 25 deg. Having the gage there reminds me to insure that I have my seatbelt fastened and to slow down when I'm between 20 and 25 deg. I'm guessing that at 35 deg. the tractor would be very close to tipping. I've thought about what action to take with the 2720 should it ever start to roll. I've decided to shut off the engine and PTO and just ride it out. I know from experience that I won't have time for anything else like trying to jump clear. My best advice is to think ahead and avoid situations that feel scary. Be safe out there. I've attached a picture showing the inclinometer.

IMG_0804_M.jpg
 

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A couple of years ago I was mowing along my provincial road with a Craftsman garden tractor on the flat shoulder when the right front wheel left the shoulder and over she went into a ditch. There was no slope, just a drop off that couldn't be seen as the grass had grown up and disguised it. I didn't have time to stop or reverse the tractor, just enough time to disengage the mower as I was going over. The drop off was about six feet deep and the tractor landed upside down and banged my leg on the way over. I have a goose egg on my thigh to this day to remind me. There was no seatbelt on the garden tractor.

I have an inclinometer mounted on my 2720 to indicate side to side angle. When mowing with my 62D MMM and tires unloaded but set to the wide position, things start feeling unstable at 15 deg. and very dicey between 20 and 25 deg. Having the gage there reminds me to insure that I have my seatbelt fastened and to slow down when I'm between 20 and 25 deg. I'm guessing that at 35 deg. the tractor would be very close to tipping. I've thought about what action to take with the 2720 should it ever start to roll. I've decided to shut off the engine and PTO and just ride it out. I know from experience that I won't have time for anything else like trying to jump clear. My best advice is to think ahead and avoid situations that feel scary. Be safe out there. I've attached a picture showing the inclinometer.

View attachment 28901
Here's a bit of advice, use the ROPS. The ROPS is only effective IF you use your seatbelt. For those who don't choose to use the ROPS, don't wear the seatbelt. With the ROPS folded and the belt on, the tractor could easily crush the operator when it rolls. Leaving the seatbelt off/ROPS folded will maybe allow you to escape death with only broken bones and major injuries as only the extremely lucky could roll a tractor without using this safety equipment and not get hurt.


All all else beyond this is completely repairable. :good2:
 

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Diesel shadow nailed it.

Too many variables, and the tipping point changes too quickly, to rely on a silly gauge.
Speed, Load, steering inputs, ruts, woodchuck dens, mud, traction, liquid shifting and sloshing in the spray tanks and fuel tank...etc.

In most cases, if you have your weight shifted more than 90% to one ass cheek, things are fixing to get expensive and painfull.

If you're in a Narrow tractor, you know darn well what the tipping point is, because if you're sitting upright, your ear is against the cab window.
Dunno how many times a collapsing woodchuck den, has raised a knot on my grape, and made me thank whatever drunk angel watches over farmers after a quick steering input keeps things upright. No time to look at a stupid gauge if I had one.

Narrow makes life more exciting.:crazy:

 

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Sort of along the same line...

I had a friend/ work aquaintance of many years, that drove a 80 ton crane truck. He was the one I always requested when I needed a RTU (roof top unit) placed on the roof. Well...Mitch became too much of a cowboy with his rig and was always pushing the limits. It caught up to him, unfortunately.

He was moving one of those bunkers that store dynamite for an oilfield operation. He lifted the bunker (small concrete building) with his boom up at about a 25 degree angle,but not boomed out very much at all, then raised his out riggers about a foot off the ground and took off down the dirt road. He was only going to move it...maybe 100 yds.

The load got to swinging back and forth almost immediately. He and his helper realized it was going to go over. Mitch yelled "JUMP! " ...and he did. The helper didnt and stayed in the cab. Mitch jumped out just in time for the crane boom to come down and crush him. If only he would have stayed inside the cab......
 

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I'm glad you're OK.

I have an inclinometer and realize that it's there as a backup to my pucker factor. I think they are a good thing as long as one realizes that 25-degrees may be within one machine's limits; but not another's.

The best gauge is the 3-pounds of gray gelatinous goo between one's ears.
 

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I'm glad you're OK.

I have an inclinometer and realize that it's there as a backup to my pucker factor. I think they are a good thing as long as one realizes that 25-degrees may be within one machine's limits; but not another's.

The best gauge is the 3-pounds of gray gelatinous goo between one's ears.
I've got same one and it about sums it up.
 

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Fear of tipping over is a GOOD thing. It will keep you from doing something stupid.

I thought about an inclinometer, but instead decided to just use the tractor and anywhere I'm concerned, I slow it way down and take it easy in 4wd low (best way to avoid trouble is trust your instincts)

There are a couple of spots where I get the pucker going, but I bet if I measured it, it's really not that steep of a side-angle meaning my personal limits should be well within the capabilities of the tractor.

Any time you try to establish a hard line for "limits" - that hard line will get pushed.
 

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I am amazed at the number of pictures I see posted with the ROPS folded or removed completely. I do safety for my job and fight with people every day about using the personal protective equipment provided them. I don't pretend to preach to people on here, because I figure everyone can and has read their operator's manual which says exactly what dieselshadow said. Roll-Gard up, use the belt. Roll-Gard down, no belt. I have a couple spots that I have to fold mine to get under trees, so I mow that first and then up goes the bar. I feel a lot more comfortable with it up and with the belt to hold me in the seat. John Deere developed the Roll-Gard many years ago. After it was patented, JD released the patent for other manufacturers to use without charge to protect operators and save lives. I remember using a toy tractor with a Roll-Gard attached while teaching 4-H Tractor Safety to farm kids.

And, if the safety and protection part doesn't interest you, just think how cool it looks with it up. We have read on here about one accident, which thankfully provided a great lesson with no one injured. I don't want to log in some day and find a post from a friend or family member that one of our JD brothers or sisters has been injured or worse in a rollover with no protection.

Thanks for listening.

Don
 

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Diesel was on the money with his post following mine earlier in this thread. Don't fold the ROPS unless you absolutely have to. I didn't point that out in my post because I never operate my tractor with the ROPS folded and fortunately since it clears my garage doors I have no reason to fold it. If the ROPS is up, wear your seatbelt! If it is folded, don't wear the seatbelt but have a bailout plan. In any event, think ahead to what you will do if the tractor starts to go. It happens so quickly that any action on your part has to be an immediate reaction. You won't have time to consider your options, not even the kiss your ass goodbye one. Hopefully it is something that you folks will never experience.
 

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The problem with a fixed angle is the same as the problem with a "weight limit". There's a big difference between a static and dynamic load. Similarly at some magic critical angle you have the "dynamic" factors of the terrain, tires, load, and other stuff that's changing quicker than you can react.

To gauge when I'm at a bad angle, I use a device called an "Inter-Gluteus Radian Spinktometer". Everyone has one, and when coupled with that 3 pounds of gray pudding in your noggin, it does a good job. There is a bit of a calibration cycle required. Enclosed is a picture of a particularly brutal calibration cycle I had. Note the use of the Orange "trainer tractor" for this procedure. Fortunately the results of the calibration cycle are stored in no volatile memory and so far so good. :good2:

Pete
 

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The problem with a fixed angle is the same as the problem with a "weight limit". There's a big difference between a static and dynamic load. Similarly at some magic critical angle you have the "dynamic" factors of the terrain, tires, load, and other stuff that's changing quicker than you can react.

To gauge when I'm at a bad angle, I use a device called an "Inter-Gluteus Radian Spinktometer". Everyone has one, and when coupled with that 3 pounds of gray pudding in your noggin, it does a good job. There is a bit of a calibration cycle required. Enclosed is a picture of a particularly brutal calibration cycle I had. Note the use of the Orange "trainer tractor" for this procedure. Fortunately the results of the calibration cycle are stored in no volatile memory and so far so good. :good2:

Pete
Ouch - nothing like a newly calibrated pucker factor.
 
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