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Discussion Starter #1
With our recent ice storms, the surface of everything has been coated with ice. The predicted warmth before the snow didn't happen so we ended up with snow on top of ice on the roads, sidewalks you name it. It makes the trees look really nice and pretty, but it also is tough on many of the trees as the ice has been stripping the limbs, etc.

Once you either plow or shovel away the snow, in many cases you are left with bare ice. In the areas which are paved or that can tolerate the snow melt product I typically use has Magnesium Chloride and other snow melt products designed to be more safe for surfaces and for my K9 kids feet.

But for wooden decks and any other surface which you don't want to use the traditional ice melting products, I have found a product which works really well for "traction" and to help reduce the slip and fall on glare ice. The product is crushed quartzite and is sold as the Cherry Stone Grit brand product in our area.

This product is actually sold at the farm supply local Mill. Apparently it is commonly used by those raising chicks and chickens as they need to consume the stones and it does something to their gizzards and helps the chickens process corn and other food. The chicks eat the stones when young and it becomes a crucial part of their digestive process for the rest of their lives.

Two of the more difficult driveways I plow still had ice under the snow, despite the snow melt treatment, which made traction a challenge. The tractor spun in 4wd and slid around going up the hills. I applied a gallon of the crushed quartzite to each driveway surface area and the traction was dramatically better, I was able to drive up and down them almost as if the ice was completely gone.

As sparingly as this is applied, if you end up running it through your snow blower, you likely won't even notice it. I suppose you could apply it very heavily, but I am not sure what the benefit would be verses simply applying enough to improve traction.

The pictures show the product bag, a snow and ice covered tree outside of our entrance door just a short while ago as it was getting dark and the actual crushed quartzite material in a former milk jug which I cut the top off of to help me apply the crushed quartzite to the driveways.

Advantages -

  • Very fine crushed quart zite granules which are angle ground for maximum traction enhancement.
  • Easily applied with a fertilizer spreader or by sprinkling by hand or other methods.
  • Low cost as a 50lb bag cost $6.00.
  • Doesn't degrade over time and doesn't attract moisture. You can store the open bag for years and it will be useful when needed.
  • Use it very sparingly, a one gallon milk jug treated the entire driveway surface which is 16' wide and 80 feet long in the areas I treated.
  • Non Water soluble so the product won't break down or dissolve in the rain or when the ice softens.
  • Easily removed from the surface when no longer needed by either sweeping or using blower.
  • Ideal for wooden steps, decks, etc.
  • Also useful in water filtration systems as well as in certain masonry finishing mixtures.
  • Can be blended with snow melt products and applied to help pre-treat areas which are traction challenged under difficult conditions, before the storm arrives.
Disadvantages


  • Doesn't break down the ice or eliminate it.
  • During freeze thaw cycles, additional applications may need to keep the surface treated.
  • Small pieces tracked into your house can scratch flooring surface
 

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Good stuff

Comes from the New Ulm Quartzite Quarry 8 miles away. Works great although it really hammers in the vacuum cleaner. You can get it by the truck load if you want. We used lots of it years back when we put it on livestock trailer floors using fiberglass resin. Makes the floor impermeable, nonslip for livestock, and wears well.
 

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We all use a similar style aggregate for our roadways. Here it’s called 7mm gyra, popular in the city vs salting the roads. Does hell on your windshield and if you have wide offset tires like my personal truck the rocker doors get pretty beat up.

I personally use their “pickle mix” which is the rock mixed with salt, doesn’t freeze in the spreader hooper (1 yard capacity) and melts down some.

Superior traction vs sand which some guys use
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I have used cheap no-name cat litter or oil dry.

Doug
I have used both "Oil Dry" and cat litter and they work OK, but NOTHING like this stuff.......The oil dry seems to absorb moisture (like its supposed to) and then gets soft and isn't as helpful with traction.

One of my neighbors bought the cat litter that has the clay on it to spread for traction on the ice and WHAT A FREAKING MESS that turned into, :lolol:smeared clay all over everything and actually got on boots and even tires and made them much more slippery........It was kind of funny actually as he was bragging about how "If the cheap cat litter helps with traction, the premium cat litter should be much better"........Boy was that a bad decision......

Cat litter helps, Cat litter with the clay on it is major NO NO for anything but Litter Boxes......So, anyone who does use Cat litter, make sure it has NO coating or clay or "scent agent" on it or you will have a mess and one which is tough to clean up.......The clay off the cat litter actually looked like feces smeared all over the snow and ice......I told him "Looks like you have been visited by a herd of 2,000 pound cats" with the mess he had from the clay coating.....:laugh::lol:

I should have taken pictures of it...........:banghead:

So, anyone who does use Kitty Litter, make sure it's not coated with anything..............

Another neighbor threw water softener pellets out and the only thing they did was melt straight through the ice and they laid on the concrete under the ice, pretty much in tact. I drove over them for him with my tractor and it helped some as I crushed the water softener "tablets" under the ice, but it was a far cry from how rock salt works............there is something in the way the water softener pellets are made which seems to hold them together and they don't "radiate" the melting of ice the way rock salt does.

They just melt straight through the ice and sit there, pretty much in tact..............I would bet had I not driven over them and crushed them (at his request) they would have remained in the tablet form once the snow and ice melt with the next thaw freeze cycle which is today. Supposed to be 40 degrees today and then down in the teens again starting tomorrow.........

I will bet the water softener pellets help "pre-treat" the concrete somewhat once they are crushed from being driven over. There is such a concentration of salt in the area of the tablet, its going to be interesting to see what happens to the driveway when the next snow comes. It doesn't look like we will have to wait long to see..............
 

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Discussion Starter #6
We all use a similar style aggregate for our roadways. Here it’s called 7mm gyra, popular in the city vs salting the roads. Does hell on your windshield and if you have wide offset tires like my personal truck the rocker doors get pretty beat up.

I personally use their “pickle mix” which is the rock mixed with salt, doesn’t freeze in the spreader hooper (1 yard capacity) and melts down some.

Superior traction vs sand which some guys use
Hey, is that a counterfeit coin lying there in the picture....??:laugh:

Oh, nope, it's a Canadian Penny.......(Just kidding.....)

The first time I was well into Canada I stopped at a coin car wash to rinse off my Harley and the sign said "Loonies and Toonies Only"......on the car wash machine.....At first, I thought "What does a cartoon for Bugs Bunny or Road Runner have to do with the Car wash Machine"? I was expecting Wylie Coyote to come out of the back room with a hand truck with crates from "Acme Corp" to attempt to set his next trap for the Road Runner........:laugh:

Then I learned the Coins with the Loons on them are the "Loonies" and apparently the "Toonies" are Two Dollar coins in Canada.......Canadian Money is always so colorful compared to many other nations coinage.

I collect currency from different economies around the globe. It's interesting what some of the coins and bills look like. For example the Iraqi Dinar used to have Sadam's image on the bills, I think every denomination of Dinar in his "era" had his image on them, I guess that's one of the perks of being a ruthless dictator, you can have your image on all of your nations currency...:dunno:...Since I am into Scripophily*.......these things interest me......(*collector of financial documents, currencies, etc.)

If the One Dollar Canadian coin is the Loonie because of the Loon on it, the Two Dollar Coin should have been called "the Bear" or "Polar Bear" to be specific, but it doesn't roll off the tongue when you say "loonie and the bear" or "loonie and Polar bear" the same way "Loonies and Toonies" does..................:laugh::lol: Canada does an interesting job minting their coins, the Toonie is an "insert coin" and the Loonie is 12 sided, which easily distinguishes it when you reach into your pocket......

I really hate to see the credit and debit cards replacing the "real money" in transactions. Many of the coins and bills around the world are very interesting and some, like the Loonie and Toonie are really well crafted, especially compared to the coins of other countries.

dist

 

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Discussion Starter #7
Comes from the New Ulm Quartzite Quarry 8 miles away. Works great although it really hammers in the vacuum cleaner. You can get it by the truck load if you want. We used lots of it years back when we put it on livestock trailer floors using fiberglass resin. Makes the floor impermeable, nonslip for livestock, and wears well.
Kurtee, I just noticed I overlooked in my original response that you are new to GTT.

Please make sure to complete your signature telling us about your equipment, etc. when you get time as it's helpful when posts about technical issues or questions arise to help clarify equipment models, etc.
So, WELCOME TO GTT......We are glad you are here....

:wgtt:
 

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If the One Dollar Canadian coin is the Loonie because of the Loon on it, the Two Dollar Coin should have been called "the Bear" or "Polar Bear" to be specific, but it doesn't roll off the tongue when you say "loonie and the bear" or "loonie and Polar bear" the same way "Loonies and Toonies" does..................:laugh::lol: Canada does an interesting job minting their coins, the Toonie is an "insert coin" and the Loonie is 12 sided, which easily distinguishes it when you reach into your pocket......
I believe Toonie is named for being the sum of two loonies essentially. I still remember in 96' when the Toonie came out and you'd see if you could "pop" the centre of the coin out. Here in Canada the Toonie is our most treasured form of currency, you can take it to Tim Hortons and trade it for a double double! I don't deal much with cash anymore but on the occasion I'm always shocked at the new bills that have come out and how colourful and descriptive they are. I also like to collect currency from country i have visited, unfortunately it just sits in a box.
 

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With our recent ice storms, the surface of everything has been coated with ice. The predicted warmth before the snow didn't happen so we ended up with snow on top of ice on the roads, sidewalks you name it. It makes the trees look really nice and pretty, but it also is tough on many of the trees as the ice has been stripping the limbs, etc.

Once you either plow or shovel away the snow, in many cases you are left with bare ice. In the areas which are paved or that can tolerate the snow melt product I typically use has Magnesium Chloride and other snow melt products designed to be more safe for surfaces and for my K9 kids feet.

But for wooden decks and any other surface which you don't want to use the traditional ice melting products, I have found a product which works really well for "traction" and to help reduce the slip and fall on glare ice. The product is crushed quartzite and is sold as the Cherry Stone Grit brand product in our area.

This product is actually sold at the farm supply local Mill. Apparently it is commonly used by those raising chicks and chickens as they need to consume the stones and it does something to their gizzards and helps the chickens process corn and other food. The chicks eat the stones when young and it becomes a crucial part of their digestive process for the rest of their lives.

Two of the more difficult driveways I plow still had ice under the snow, despite the snow melt treatment, which made traction a challenge. The tractor spun in 4wd and slid around going up the hills. I applied a gallon of the crushed quartzite to each driveway surface area and the traction was dramatically better, I was able to drive up and down them almost as if the ice was completely gone.

As sparingly as this is applied, if you end up running it through your snow blower, you likely won't even notice it. I suppose you could apply it very heavily, but I am not sure what the benefit would be verses simply applying enough to improve traction.

The pictures show the product bag, a snow and ice covered tree outside of our entrance door just a short while ago as it was getting dark and the actual crushed quartzite material in a former milk jug which I cut the top off of to help me apply the crushed quartzite to the driveways.

Advantages -

  • Very fine crushed quart zite granules which are angle ground for maximum traction enhancement.
  • Easily applied with a fertilizer spreader or by sprinkling by hand or other methods.
  • Low cost as a 50lb bag cost $6.00.
  • Doesn't degrade over time and doesn't attract moisture. You can store the open bag for years and it will be useful when needed.
  • Use it very sparingly, a one gallon milk jug treated the entire driveway surface which is 16' wide and 80 feet long in the areas I treated.
  • Non Water soluble so the product won't break down or dissolve in the rain or when the ice softens.
  • Easily removed from the surface when no longer needed by either sweeping or using blower.
  • Ideal for wooden steps, decks, etc.
  • Also useful in water filtration systems as well as in certain masonry finishing mixtures.
  • Can be blended with snow melt products and applied to help pre-treat areas which are traction challenged under difficult conditions, before the storm arrives.
Disadvantages


  • Doesn't break down the ice or eliminate it.
  • During freeze thaw cycles, additional applications may need to keep the surface treated.
  • Small pieces tracked into your house can scratch flooring surface
SulleyBear ~ For years I've used Play Sand with much the same results as you've stated. I suspect it would be a good option should Cherry Stone Grit not be available. And a bag or two in the trunk over the rear wheels serves as a little extra weight and a possible 'go-to' option should one get stuck.
 

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SulleyBear ~ For years I've used Play Sand with much the same results as you've stated. I suspect it would be a good option should Cherry Stone Grit not be available. And a bag or two in the trunk over the rear wheels serves as a little extra weight and a possible 'go-to' option should one get stuck.
Around here Lowe’s, Tractor Supply, and some hardware stores carry tube sand. It’s not actually sand however depending on what brand it is. The one pictured has what we call anti skid - finely ground gravel. Others are a coarse sand.

It’s common for folks with pickups to out a couple bags in the bed. Not only does a little extra weight help - you can open a bag and spread some to get yourself or someone else unstuck. It doesn’t take more than a couple handfuls to do a lot of good - a little goes a long way. I can spread around 30# on the steep part of my driveway which is about 200’ and works wonders.

E6D388EE-7486-483A-BF42-1C5621DFFB1B.jpeg

D1CA3238-3B2F-4262-9A27-D5D20BAC01CB.jpeg

CA8167E0-1751-4DB5-9EBC-18B58E4311F4.jpeg

In the last pic you can see black stuff - that is the last of my leftover wood stove ashes which work ver well. Up above on the right side you can see the brown anti skid.
 

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Around here Lowe’s, Tractor Supply, and some hardware stores carry tube sand. It’s not actually sand however depending on what brand it is. The one pictured has what we call anti skid - finely ground gravel. Others are a coarse sand.

It’s common for folks with pickups to out a couple bags in the bed. Not only does a little extra weight help - you can open a bag and spread some to get yourself or someone else unstuck. It doesn’t take more than a couple handfuls to do a lot of good - a little goes a long way. I can spread around 30# on the steep part of my driveway which is about 200’ and works wonders.

View attachment 673176

View attachment 673178

View attachment 673180

In the last pic you can see black stuff - that is the last of my leftover wood stove ashes which work very well. Up above on the right side you can see the brown anti skid.
:thumbup1gif:

They have those tubes around here too. I don't need those because if it's that bad we just don't go out . . . prior experience is a great teacher. My dad used to toss the ashes/klinkers from the coal stove out in the alley which increased traction of course.

:laugh: Ha . . . I remember as a young kid back in the mid-West where I was raised my mom having me go out on a winter morning and wipe down the clothes line so she could hang the washing out to dry. :laugh: I could smell the burning coal outside and see the black coal ash on the white snow. Memories . . . .:mocking:
 
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