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Wife and I were looking at a new stove and we're now thinking about an induction cooktop. For years, I wanted a commercial grade gas cooktop with an electric convection oven, but would have to get propane installed at the house. Also I remember that gas stoves are a pain to clean. As we have been looking at options, we came across induction stoves, but they have been traditionally very expensive. Prices are now getting reasonable, but we're not sure if that is the way we want to go. We don't know anyone who has one yet.

The advantages are more efficient energy usage, stove surface has no open flame or hot heating element, very rapid heating, solid surface cooktop for really easy cleanup, heating unit automatically goes into standby when you remove the pot/pan and probably more advantages than I can remember.

Main disadvantages, is that induction is still more expensive than gas or standard electric and that 95% of my pots and pans need to be replaced. Induction ready cookware has to be magnetic to work, only my 3 old cast iron skillets would work. Over the years, we have purchased several All-Clad brand and good Calphalon pieces that we really like. We're going back to SS and cast iron and getting away from Teflon and other non-stick cookware. Unfortunately, most everything we have will not work, and replacing our cookware with similar "induction ready" pieces will cost much more than the new stove and then some.

There is also a hybrid stove available that has 2 regular electric burners and 2 induction burners. But if we were to go induction why not go "all the way".

Anyone have any knowledge or experience with induction cooktops? What do you think?
 

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I have some knowledge of them but you seem to have everything laid out pretty well already. IMO, they are a great idea if you've got little ones around or someone that has issues moving quickly if need be, falls or is forgetful and walks off leaving the stove on for hours on end (i.e. my 83-year old mother!)

The entire deal with no heat unless there is a ferrous metal pan on the stove top really adds to the safety of them. The downfall of course, is that sucking sounds it creates on your bank account.
 

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In short order, ALL of them induction type stoves inherit a "round stain" around the burner parameter.
Go with the gas, you'll be much happier.
I've seen that on standard ceramic cooktops but never on an induction unit.
 

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We recently replaced our stove with a natural gas convection oven. We like it a lot, cooks very nice, but as you guessed the stove top is a bit more to cleanup as its not a flat surface. Bonus is that is works even if the power goes out. Downside is that there are some fumes so we run the hood fan when its on, also we have small kids that play with things and have found the burners turned on before but not lit. :thumbsdown:

SIL got an induction oven and really likes it, we got a bunch of her old pots and pans that were only a year old because she had to buy new ones. :tongue: I wouldn't bother with a hybrid, you'll have to buy new pots anyway, may as well go all the way.
 

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We love our induction cooktop. Had it for 3+ years now. Heats VERY quickly, and stops heating even more quickly when commanded. Even better temperature control than our previous gas cooktop. Kitchen remains much cooler, as there is much less heat from the cooktop compared to gas. No brown rings like the older smooth electric cooktops often displayed.
Easy to use. Easy to clean.

Here is a picture of it after 3 years of everyday use.

ImageUploadedByTapatalk1419734854.572607.jpg

Hard to take a good picture of it due to the glare :). ...but it looks just as nice as it did the day we installed it.

We bought it online significantly cheaper than we could find it in a store. I can find the name of the place if necessary.

You'll need steel pots rather than aluminum since it uses magnetism to heat. However, we've found that even inexpensive pots like those from IKEA work great with it.
Unlike with gas, where we had high quality/price pots, we just use the cheap stuff with the induction cooktop.

I hope this helps.
 

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We went dual fuel when we built our house. Granted, propane was planned but we love the range. I enjoy cooking with gas over electric but having the oven electric keeps the temp constant. Microwave goes in pantry. Was placed on counter while painters did touch ups.

Brett

 

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My MIL gave us a NuWave Pro portable cook top last year for Christmas, we both though it to be a gimmick at first, but we use this this all the time! Luckily all our pots (Emeril branded) were compatible so we didn't have top buy new ones. It is amazing how fast you can boil a large pot of water or heat up some leftovers. If we had to replace our full size stove/oven, we would surly consider going induction.
 

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For a cooktop, I still prefer gas. As was mentioned by someone else, the oven can be electric, as I would have to use propane for that, and it would make a dent in my tank, certain times of the year, when baking.

Unfortunately, I have electric stove and oven currently, but if I ever get the remodel I want, I'll have gas stove and water heater!

Only thing I can actually offer about the stovetops in question, is they can scratch easily. But, it might be the model the friend has, so take that, FWIW.
 

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Just to make sure everyone is on the same page...

Traditional electric cooktops are totally different than induction. The only similarity is in how they plug into the wall :)

Some stores will give demonstrations of induction cooktops. HH Gregg is where we saw our first induction cooktop in action.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks for all the input so far. It seems that everyone who has or knows someone who has an induction cooktop really like them. So that is the direction we will probably take. Good thing is that my wife agrees about induction and although we try to share the cooking tasks, because of our schedules, she does most of the cooking and baking. She did make one request/demand, is that we not get rid of our favorite non-induction pots and pans for a while, in case we want to go back to traditional electric or gas. I'm OK with that too.

Timmarks makes an interesting point ...
Just to make sure everyone is on the same page...

Traditional electric cooktops are totally different than induction. The only similarity is in how they plug into the wall :)

Some stores will give demonstrations of induction cooktops. HH Gregg is where we saw our first induction cooktop in action.
Induction cooktops look exactly like solid surface traditional electric cooktops, and you can't tell unless they are on, or you read the words on the unit. I probably missed some cooktop/cookware demonstrations at the county fair the last few years because I thought they were using traditional electric cooktops. At appliance stores, we have to ask the salesperson to show us which units are induction, and they usually only have a few on display.

Now we have to do some research, I'm assuming there are home and commercial units out there. A quick search online showed prices from about $1,500 to almost $6,000 and I was just looking at 30" stand-alone units.

Thanks again to all who replied so far.
 

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Now we have to do some research, I'm assuming there are home and commercial units out there. A quick search online showed prices from about $1,500 to almost $6,000 and I was just looking at 30" stand-alone units.

Thanks again to all who replied so far.
Please keep us updated with your research and decision. I know we will have to replace our electric stand alone unit fairly soon. Would love to go with a propane unit but don't want the cost/hassle of installing tank and lines. And I really don't want another cheapie unit like we have with the plain exposed coil design. Where I live there are no places to shop for appliances like this so any additional info you can share would be appreciated!
 

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Just one thought if you are into home canning, induction will not work. Even if you do the ferrous metal insert between cooker and burner. Personally, I have thought about getting a NuWave type counterparts single induction burner to try out, but after having a flat top stove I want to go back to regular burners and honestly I am considering getting a 100 Gallon propane tank and a commercial stove with gas convection oven.
 

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Just one thought if you are into home canning, induction will not work. Even if you do the ferrous metal insert between cooker and burner. Personally, I have thought about getting a NuWave type counterparts single induction burner to try out, but after having a flat top stove I want to go back to regular burners and honestly I am considering getting a 100 Gallon propane tank and a commercial stove with gas convection oven.
That's good to know! I would have been in real trouble if I picked out a stove that you can't can on!

I'm not sure how the flat top electric stoves would work either. Gas is the way to go but that would entail me installing a propane line. I do have 2 100# tanks that I could use - I wonder how long those would last. Also wonder if the propane place will deliver 100# cylinders as I can't handle them anymore.

I've always used soft copper for my propane lines in the past but that was many years ago. Is there anything new around for propane lines? My installation would not be underground.
 

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Flexible Yellow Gas Line (semi rigid), there is some plastic stuff, and old Black Iron. Mainly depends on local building codes.
 

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Flexible Yellow Gas Line (semi rigid), there is some plastic stuff, and old Black Iron. Mainly depends on local building codes.
Eh - no codes around here.....I'll look into the flexible gas line. Not really worried about the cost of copper (still have my flaring tool) but something that is easy to handle as my hands don't work so well anymore.

I hate our electric stove.
 

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Just one thought if you are into home canning, induction will not work. Even if you do the ferrous metal insert between cooker and burner. Personally, I have thought about getting a NuWave type counterparts single induction burner to try out, but after having a flat top stove I want to go back to regular burners and honestly I am considering getting a 100 Gallon propane tank and a commercial stove with gas convection oven.

That's not a universal rule. Some of the cooktop manufacturers recommend against canning but others say it's fine and go as far as giving specific directions in their Owner's Manuals. It can be done but if it's something that the buyer is interested in doing, they are best off checking before buying.

Personally, I prefer to use my propane turkey fryer out on the back patio for canning anyway.
 

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We put an induction cooktop in our new home. We've only been in the home for about a month, but so far we LOVE the induction cooktop! It is so easy to modulate the temperature, it heats up super fast, no rings on the cooktop, no boil-overs because when you turn the heat down, it goes down immediately! We did have to ditch a few pots/pans (including our favorite skillet and our griddle), but overall, it was a great move. You get all the positives of cooking with gas without the negatives.

Like mentioned, using it for canning can be iffy. The real problem is that standard canning pots are not flat on the bottom, but have a ring around the outside edge. This doesn't allow enough heat to get to the pot and can cause issues, but that is the same problem on standard flat-top cook tops as well. Find a flat-bottom ferrous pot and you should be fine.
 

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We put an induction cooktop in our new home. We've only been in the home for about a month, but so far we LOVE the induction cooktop! It is so easy to modulate the temperature, it heats up super fast, no rings on the cooktop, no boil-overs because when you turn the heat down, it goes down immediately! We did have to ditch a few pots/pans (including our favorite skillet and our griddle), but overall, it was a great move. You get all the positives of cooking with gas without the negatives.

Like mentioned, using it for canning can be iffy. The real problem is that standard canning pots are not flat on the bottom, but have a ring around the outside edge. This doesn't allow enough heat to get to the pot and can cause issues, but that is the same problem on standard flat-top cook tops as well. Find a flat-bottom ferrous pot and you should be fine.
Thanks for your review - I see now that I would have options.
 

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Update, we just picked up a NuWave2 at our local Bed Bath and Beyond. Just like the TV ad, you get a free ceramic non-stick omelet pan with the portable unit. So far we have only cooked a few eggs on it.

FYI, the TV advertised getting 2 for the price of 1, with separate S&H, which is $99.00 plus $29.99 X 2 for a total of about $160. At BBB it is $99 and with a 20% coupon, I got one unit for $80, so same price.

As a review, it boils water just a little faster than our electric stove, and when you turn it off, it stops boiling almost immediately. The water was only boiling in the center, above the "ferrous" center part of the pan. Checking with a thermometer, the water along the edge of the pan was at least 20 degrees cooler than in the center. We boiled water with the included omelet pan, because none of our other pots/pans are induction compatible. An interesting point is that the included pan seems to be an aluminum pan with a special ferrous area permanently attached to the bottom that is the same size as the induction area of the cooker. Induction compatible cookware we have looked at in stores are entirely magnetic, so that may help.

One other tidbit, the included omelet pan's bottom (the cooking side) is not flat. It is slightly raised in the center. That makes my butter and eggs migrate to the edges of the pan. I didn't like that as much as my usual omelet pan which is completely flat inside.

I do have one SS stockpot that is magnetic, but currently is being used for something else. The bottom of this pot is not flat, but is raised in the center. When available, I'm going to try it out and see what happens on a non-flat bottom.

So far, I don't have enough experience with it to say induction is better or worse, but this small portable unit would seem to be great for cooking breakfast on my deck, or camping (with electric hookup).

As for canning, if the canning pot is induction compatible, I don't understand why it would pose a problem. Assuming the pot has a flat bottom and boils water, it should work ... right? :unknown:

More to come, Just my 2 cents so far.
 
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