Green Tractor Talk banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,964 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
My wife keeps sending me of cute dogs that are in need of adopting. Today I told her if she wants another dog we are going to need to fence in an area to let them run in. I was looking at T posts and field fence but I have no idea what the spacing should be. Like I said I would just be keeping dogs in and neither are bigger than 65lbs.

Thanks for the advise.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,503 Posts
My wife keeps sending me of cute dogs that are in need of adopting. Today I told her if she wants another dog we are going to need to fence in an area to let them run in. I was looking at T posts and field fence but I have no idea what the spacing should be. Like I said I would just be keeping dogs in and neither are bigger than 65lbs.

Thanks for the advise.
Take a look at high-tensile fencing, that is about as cheap as you can go. It uses wood posts spaced significantly farther apart than conventional fencing.

http://www.kencove.com/fence/4_Why+Build+High-Tensile+Fences?_resource.php
 

·
GTT's Pilot in Command (PIC)
Joined
·
8,558 Posts
T post and "bull fence" is better, if you have wildlife nearby. I'd space the posts every 6 feet. I also like to place concrete below the fence along the perimeter, to discourage skunks, and other vermin from digging in, as well as your from trying to dig out, if they find something interesting.

If I were doing a smaller area, (less than half an acre), I still like chain link. Skunks will come in between gate and posts, and raccoons will still climb it, but it holds up better in the long term.

I have one friend that used a few steel, chain link posts, along with T posts, and then used cattle panels. She has larger dogs than I do. (Hers are over 50lbs.) I would worry that a small gap would form, and a dog would get its head caught between the panels. But, it allowed her to get help setting the posts, and do the rest herself.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Levi

·
Registered
Joined
·
967 Posts
Although I will agree with you about Petsafe....to a certain point only. We have approximately 8-10 acres covered with the underground wire etc. If you read the instructions that comes with the product, it clearly notes about lightening. "If" your not at home to turn off the system... You will lose the main electronic part real quick by lightening in the area. I lost 3 controllers two years ago. The lightening was some 7-12 miles away also. Other than that... it works great...after you get it dialed in and your kids trained. :banghead:
 
  • Like
Reactions: ColonyPark

·
GTT's Pilot in Command (PIC)
Joined
·
8,558 Posts
Although I will agree with you about Petsafe....to a certain point only. We have approximately 8-10 acres covered with the underground wire etc. If you read the instructions that comes with the product, it clearly notes about lightening. "If" your not at home to turn off the system... You will lose the main electronic part real quick by lightening in the area. I lost 3 controllers two years ago. The lightening was some 7-12 miles away also. Other than that... it works great...after you get it dialed in and your kids trained. :banghead:
And as long as the battery in the collar doesn't go dead. I've had friends that had that problem. :banghead:
 
  • Like
Reactions: HouseMouse

·
Senior GTT Super Slacker
Joined
·
37,815 Posts
Although I will agree with you about Petsafe....to a certain point only. We have approximately 8-10 acres covered with the underground wire etc. If you read the instructions that comes with the product, it clearly notes about lightening. "If" your not at home to turn off the system... You will lose the main electronic part real quick by lightening in the area. I lost 3 controllers two years ago. The lightening was some 7-12 miles away also. Other than that... it works great...after you get it dialed in and your kids trained. :banghead:
Good point and true. We have had our Petsafe fence for 20 plus years. Have had 3 or 4 units go bad, I presume from lightning, Petsafe replaced them them all.
 

·
Senior GTT Super Slacker
Joined
·
37,815 Posts
And as long as the battery in the collar doesn't go dead. I've had friends that had that problem. :banghead:
Our dogs learned not to go where the shock is even with a dead battery.
However, a friend of ours has two dogs that will get close enough to the fence to hear the warning tone, lay down and wait for it to stop (battery go dead) and then take off.
I guess we have dumb dogs.:lol:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
967 Posts
I think mine are dumb enough to just run through it after the neighbor's dogs.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Our Shiczu's (?) Run right through it no matter what. Put the collar on our Yellow Lab and she won't get out of bed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
365 Posts
I will agree with what the others have said about the petsafe in-ground fence. I installed mine myself and trained a young stubborn jack russell mix following the guidance that is listed in the owners manual. Our dog knows her boundary and will not cross the line even if we forget to put her collar on. We are on our second controller in 8 years because of a close by lightening strike. Other critters can still come in your yard to pay your dog a visit as this has happened on occasion to us, the worst being a black critter with a white racing stripe down its back.. That was a very bad long evening.....

I would go this route again in a heartbeat as it has worked very well for us.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,228 Posts
We did post and rail with stucco wire tacked on it. The wire is tight enough to keep in cats, and it looks pretty good too. It can be tacked to the ground with landscape staples.

-J.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,737 Posts
We have a "temporary" fence that is T posts and field fence. Going on its third year. Some of it will get moved this year for some dirt work...

We spaced our posts 10' and it is holding up real well. One dog is 100#, the other about 60#.

Kimber had a habit of jumping up on the fence, but a strand of electric wire cured that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,864 Posts
I used field fence and a mix of wood and t posts. I think at minimum the corner posts should be wood.

Some dogs don't need much of a fence, others will find any hole or will climb or jump over shorter fences. The same holds true for the invisible fences. Some dogs will never learn or care why they are getting shocked, while others will quickly learn where the boundary is.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,554 Posts
We have put up fence using the Wedge-Lok brackets that allow cross and corner bracing without using any wooden posts -- just the driven T-posts. It held up very well at the last place for the almost 20 years we were there and kept the fabric tight since you can pull against it MUCH more than an unbraced T-post. I have even used these to make end stops for my firewood stacks and they take a lot of load...

Here is a site that shows the hardware pieces and how to use them for corners and in-line bracing. They also make some gate hardware.

Wedge-Loc

You might just be able to see some details in the fence in the background of this picture of the upper path along the top of my prior property -- the woods made it somewhat difficult to get all the posts and fabric materials up there but at least we did not have to haul up wood posts, concrete, water, etc... and assembly went really quickly. You can see an in-line double diagonal brace in the middle of the frame in this image. Once you set the lower angle brackets on the posts to either side and put in the diagonals, driving in the middle post just a bit more tightens everything up really well. Normally you would place a T-post about every 8 to 10 feet of run of a fabric fence, but to use the diagonal braces the posts need to be a bit closer for just those places.

By the way, that particular straight run of fence was about 300 feet between corners. The corners were made with the same T-post and Wedge-Lok techniques as shown in the web site in the link above...

100-0067_IMG.JPG

When I asked my wife about using an invisible fence, she thought that it might be hard to get all the other animals in the neighborhood to wear their own collars to keep them OFF our property... :lolol:

Chuck
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top