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I have a 1026R with 18 x 8.5 -10 tires on the front. I have a leaker once again and believe it's time for a couple of heavy duty inner tubes in the front tires.

I'm looking for a recommendation . . .
 

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Do you know where it is leaking from?

Shortly after getting mine I picked up a nail in the left front tire between the treads. I fixed it using a tubeless repair plug. It held air fine until this summer. It started leaking around the plug.

I took off the wheel, removed the existing plug patch, broke the bead and applied a patch inside the tire made from an old inner tube, I glued it in using 5200 marine adhesive.

It isn't leaking anymore. No idea how long it will hold but 5200 is some very tenacious adhesive.
 

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Something to investigate? Back when I had a little more energy and time I mountain biked a fair bit in the warm months.
There where tubes available with internal coatings that self healed small punctures, I think produced by Slime.
Not sure if they are made in agricultural applications though.
 
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A while back I had a bead leak on a rear tire of my GX335. I decided to buy 2 tubes for that size and one each for the remaining 3 different sizes on both this and my 1026. It paid off as the GX developed a leaker on the other drive wheel... Fairly small investment for the peace of mind.

BTW, I got my tubes from one of our sponsors "Miller Tire", good service and prices.
m. e. MILLER tire :bigthumb:
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I ended up putting this in the two front tires yesterday afternoon. If it works I'll order a bag for the tires on the x320.

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Tubes are tubes for the most part.
I cant say Ive ever seen any tube labeled as Heavy Duty, at least not for smaller tires.
I doubt youd see a difference in anything but a lighter wallet.

I prefer patching the tire over tubes, because the tubes dont seal to the wheel around the valve stem.
If you wash your equipment as I do, or use it in inclement weather as I do, this can allow water in the wheel that cant easily get out. This leads to rust over time, and while it will take a much longer time to rust through a wheel, it doesnt take much to make sure you cant ever run without tubes again without some serious work to the bead area.
Slime does much the same thing over time.
I used to think it was good stuff, but after having had several wheels with that stuff in them, its only good if you break them down and clean them about every year and nobody is doing that.

I believe next time I need a repair, that Tireject stuff will be on the top of the list.
I really like the fact that it works like Slime but doesnt do damage like Slime.
 
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I've used the TireJect with great results. Impressive actually. :good2:
 

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If you go the tube route, I get whatever they have at Tractor Supply. I have had decent results but they are Chinese made so.....:greentractorride:
 

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Tubes

Unfortunately, most of the tubes are made in China, Thailand or India. IMHO, those made in India may be slightly more consistent but I don't think there's a huge difference in any of them.

LiquiTube is another sealant that is very good. It seals well and can be washed off a rim if you ever want to change the tire. It's labeled for off road use and on road heavy tires (10 ply) but I'm getting ready to put it in a light trailer tire that's got a slow leak. There is also a formulation to use with loaded tires which can be reused by pumping the liquid out and reinstalling it in a new tire.

I really prefer tubeless tires when possible. A tube is just one more thing to go bad plus if you pick up a simple puncture, you have to break the tire/wheel down instead of just plugging it. To each his own, but I prefer tubeless in most situations.

Treefarmer
 
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