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Discussion Starter #1
Over the holidays, Katriel's grandparents are visiting.

So, we put them to work!

The steel sheets were pre-cut to length so that we didn't need to splice. (Special order from Menard's).

Katriel did a lot of the insulation (R-38 Batts). She has "lots to say" about the project...

Enjoy...

 

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Nice Tim, that building is sure looking good!
 

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The finished interior of my barn is finished this way, ceiling and walls. Makes it nice and bright and I don't have to worry about leaning anything against the drywall and damaging it.
 

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Now that is one sweet, "garage-barn thingie". Well worth the time and energy you have invested. You are blessed to have the quality, enthusiastic help. You were also smart enough to build it to fit your Deere needs. I on the other hand are still faced with a aircraft carrier landing, trying to put a 1025r / 54" deck into a 56" barn door after every mission. Just try that on a moonless stormy night. Oh well spring project. :bigthumb:
 

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#great job by all! :good2:
 

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Discussion Starter #6
#great job by all! :good2:
Hey Levi! You spotted Katriel's new "hash tag". She's been having fun with that thing.
 

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The finished interior of my barn is finished this way, ceiling and walls. Makes it nice and bright and I don't have to worry about leaning anything against the drywall and damaging it.
I am still trying to decide on how to finish the walls. Drywall is out! I see no use for drywall in a building like this.

1) Steel siding - Would be relatively easy to install, strong, and look very 'clean'. However, I'm concerned about building shelving against it, or other 'customizations' like hanging tools, etc. Would be interested in feedback on this.

2) OSB - Easy to attach would shelves, hooks, etc. Would not look as clean as steel, even if painted.

1 or 2 with some portion of
3) Peg-board - Lots of flexibility, but is it strong enough to hold heavier tools on the pegs? With pegs, it would be more expensive than 1 or 2.

4) "Slat-wall"Menard's slat-wall

5) Other choices?

My intent is to get the floor poured before I finish the interior walls, so this decision doesn't have to be made yet. But it doesn't hurt to start thinking about it.

Tim
 

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Adding a ceiling to my shed was one of the best decisions I made during construction!!



Mine was coincidence more than plan,,,
I went to buy siding screws and saw the siding company had a couple 4 foot tall stacks of roofing drops.
The drops were 4+feet long.

They were ecstatic to be able to sell them,,, I think I paid $0.50 per piece, cut to length, which was 47 inches.

I hauled home over 3,000 square feet in a 1985 Chevy S-10 that had 400,000 miles on it,,

That little 4WD never got into high gear all the 35 mile trip,,, :laugh:
In hindsight,,, a different method to haul should have been used,,,:dunno:
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Adding a ceiling to my shed was one of the best decisions I made during construction!!

Mine was coincidence more than plan,,,
I went to buy siding screws and saw the siding company had a couple 4 foot tall stacks of roofing drops.
The drops were 4+feet long.

They were ecstatic to be able to sell them,,, I think I paid $0.50 per piece, cut to length, which was 47 inches.

I hauled home over 3,000 square feet in a 1985 Chevy S-10 that had 400,000 miles on it,,

That little 4WD never got into high gear all the 35 mile trip,,, :laugh:
In hindsight,,, a different method to haul should have been used,,,:dunno:
CAD,

I guess I need further explanation of the picture. Are we seeing the steel roof on the right side? Where is the ceiling?

Sorry for not being able to understand this.

Tim
 

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CAD,

I guess I need further explanation of the picture. Are we seeing the steel roof on the right side? Where is the ceiling?

Sorry for not being able to understand this.

Tim
That roof makes everybody wonder.
The "red" is 4X6 steel "I" beams that you normally see driven in the ground to hold up guard rail along the side of the road.

The roof is on top of the beam, 6 inches below that, the roofing drops are setting in the flange of the beams.

The beams are on 4 foot centers, so the 47" drops were perfect,,, no fasteners hold the ceiling, just gravity.

This roofing is screwed to the beams,,, every hole had to be drilled and tapped before the screw would go in,,, :flag_of_truce:

 

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Very nice Tim. I've watched it twice more or less. Metal ceiling is great, bright, easy to clean, etc. Metal side walls vs OSB sidewalls . . . . I like the metal idea but the cost and denting would be a factor to consider. OSB painted white would take the dents.

Thanks again . . . . :kidw_truck_smiley:
 

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Hey Levi! You spotted Katriel's new "hash tag". She's been having fun with that thing.
Yah, I thought it was great. Did she make it or buy it?
As for inside walls. This is just my thoughts but I go with the cheapest ½" plywood you can get. Easy to put up, you can write on it, mark on it (mark where all the studs are) and attach anything you want on it. It will also last a long time and can be painted any way you want.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Yah, I thought it was great. Did she make it or buy it?
As for inside walls. This is just my thoughts but I go with the cheapest ½" plywood you can get. Easy to put up, you can write on it, mark on it (mark where all the studs are) and attach anything you want on it. It will also last a long time and can be painted any way you want.
We gave it to her for Christmas. Found it on clearance at .... Wait for it....Menard's.

Tim
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Looks like the young gal has a lot of options to pursue when it comes time for her career decisions.
a. Farmers wife, lol.
b. Civil Engineer
c. County Inspector
d. Home improvement contractor
e. and the best for last......dads supervisor:lol:
Bill,

Interesting that you mention 'County Inspector'. Katriel's Granddad (shown in the ceiling installation video) was the Martin County NC building inspector for many years. That is pretty close to you, right?

Tim
 

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Bill,

Interesting that you mention 'County Inspector'. Katriel's Granddad (shown in the ceiling installation video) was the Martin County NC building inspector for many years. That is pretty close to you, right?

Tim
Martin County is north of us, 'bout 2 hrs. or so. :thumbup1gif:
 

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I am still trying to decide on how to finish the walls. Drywall is out! I see no use for drywall in a building like this.

1) Steel siding - Would be relatively easy to install, strong, and look very 'clean'. However, I'm concerned about building shelving against it, or other 'customizations' like hanging tools, etc. Would be interested in feedback on this.

2) OSB - Easy to attach would shelves, hooks, etc. Would not look as clean as steel, even if painted.

1 or 2 with some portion of
3) Peg-board - Lots of flexibility, but is it strong enough to hold heavier tools on the pegs? With pegs, it would be more expensive than 1 or 2.

4) "Slat-wall"Menard's slat-wall

5) Other choices?

My intent is to get the floor poured before I finish the interior walls, so this decision doesn't have to be made yet. But it doesn't hurt to start thinking about it.

Tim
My interior with the steel siding is pretty easy to hang or attach wherever you need to it. I have cabinets anchored to the walls, a peg board panel over my bench, conduit and boxes for lights, plugs and switches, signs, white boards, etc all attached either directly to it or to the girts behind it.

I have yet to dent it, though I'm not trying. I have hot and cold water in the barn and I can wash down things in the barn without worry of water harming my walls...

It's great all purpose stuff.

You could do steel up 4' or so then go with wall board or ply above that-it would give you ease of finishing the top and save some expense and get the durability of the steel portion.
 

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I've got steel all the way up on my walls. I love it! Very easy to keep clean (use the pressure washer), I've yet to put a dent in it that wouldn't have resulted in a hole in a wood wall, it looks great, and most of all, it's fireproof! It's really nice not to have to worry when I'm grinding and welding!! One thing that I really like is that if I want to add any electric or plumbing, I just unscrew it, do the work, then screw it back on...quick and easy!
I hung my bolt bins, etc on it by using a 2x4 vertically to get me away from the ridges...quick and easy.
My ceiling is next!
JH
 

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hdpe

You might look at HDPE along the bottom or around a "wash" area. I have a friend who used that and loves it as he hunts a lot and can just use the pressure washer to clean up any mess. It's also dent resistant, fairly strong and bright.

Treefarmer
 

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Nice building! For the past year or so, since my semi-retirement, I've been helping a contractor who kind of specializes in metal roofing and siding. The inside liner steel that we use is a gauge lighter than what we use outside. All of our steel comes from a local Mennonite family owned business that also builds portable structures.

Just a couple of comments:
- Typically we'd run 1x4 pine purlins just about anywhere under the steel. An exception would be when we side over a studded wall. The purlins are run on 2' centers, using spacers to keep them running true. We did a large garage this summer with trusses that were 4' apart. There we used 2x4s for purlins. It was way too big to be done with one sheet, so it had a joint in the middle.

- We measure and pre-drill all screw holes before we hang the sheets. That makes everything look nice and even...probably most important when looking up/across roof steel from outside. We also run J channel around the perimeters.

- Inside wall steel gets hung with the ribs running horizontal, floor to ceiling. That keeps wash down water from getting behind the laps. A lot of times, we'll strip lap joints with butyl tape if we're concerned about water penetrating the joint. When we're spanning 6x6s in a pole building, using 2x4 purlins give you some strength for hanging things.

-As was already mentioned, when mounting something on the walls/ceilings that will span the ribs, pad it out with 3/4" lumber and you'll clear the ribs.

-Also as was already mentioned, they do make a plastic panel for the bottom wall run and it matches the steel very well. I thought it was a smooth fiberglass but I never actually been involved with hanging it.

Again, nice job!
Jim


I am still trying to decide on how to finish the walls. Drywall is out! I see no use for drywall in a building like this.

1) Steel siding - Would be relatively easy to install, strong, and look very 'clean'. However, I'm concerned about building shelving against it, or other 'customizations' like hanging tools, etc. Would be interested in feedback on this.

2) OSB - Easy to attach would shelves, hooks, etc. Would not look as clean as steel, even if painted.

1 or 2 with some portion of
3) Peg-board - Lots of flexibility, but is it strong enough to hold heavier tools on the pegs? With pegs, it would be more expensive than 1 or 2.

4) "Slat-wall"Menard's slat-wall

5) Other choices?

My intent is to get the floor poured before I finish the interior walls, so this decision doesn't have to be made yet. But it doesn't hurt to start thinking about it.

Tim
 
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