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I posted a few weeks ago that I received a "free"(nothing is free) Ingersoll Rand Type 30 air compressor. I researched a bit and thought it would be worth while to rebuild. Just the compressor head new runs about 1200$. Rebuild at best 130$ for gaskets and finger valves. Of course there could be a further cost if a piston or head was bad, but we'll get to that....

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So right out the gate I had to buy a 327$ 5hp Single phase Baldor electric motor. The one that was on it was 3 phase and trash anyway. Pulled the top off the piston heads and found a finger valve on the high pressure side broke. So another 130$ for a gasket and ring kit that came with the finger valves. Other than the one broke valve everything else looked good besides being gunky and some really bad oil.

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Cleaned up the top end, installed the new finger valves and decided to give it a run. Right off the bat I heard a distinct noise. Definitely coming from the high pressure side. Wrist slap/wrist clap. So I pulled the high pressure head and lone behold the connecting arm where the wrist pin is, is oblong. Well there's another 27$.

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So far it's been a really easy rebuild. Going to have the tank sandblasted and I'll just do a rattle can paint job as this will be outside my shop and unseen for the most part. I have a 60 upright husky that I will likely sell to recoup the cost of rebuilding this far superior Ingersoll Rand Type 30. It's outside as well. The "shed" I built around it will have to be rebuilt as the Husky is an upright and the Ingersoll is a horizontal.... another project.

Just ordered the connecting arm so I'll update next week:bigthumb:
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Stripped down ready for sandblasting. Weld the motor mount back and ready for paint in no time.:bigbeer:

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Very nice.

I don't think I would sell the 60 gallon but rather take the motor and pump of it and tie the tank into the new compressor and have additional capacity

That's an option I haven't thought of....:bigthumb:
 

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I think the oil was bad:lol:

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Discussion Starter #8
More capacity would be good but I don't think I'll need it. I would run out of air with the husky because of the tiny 10 CFM at 90 psi capability. The Ingersoll should give me 20-25 CFM at 125 PSI. Huge difference. Plus I told my financial committee that I could sell the Husky to fix up the Ingersoll. So she overrules me and the frivolous spending GTT members. :lol:
 

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The oil and the rust level in the crankcase would lead me to believe that there was a fair amount of water in the oil, not really uncommon, but I'd be concerned that every bearing/journal surface would be worn. Perhaps worn a lot like the oblong wrist pin hole on the connecting rod. I'd probably just order all new crank, con rods, main bearings etc.
 

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I had problems with winter starting my 5HP compressor and of course they want you to use 30wt Non Detergent oil. I crossed my fingers and went with 30 wt synthetic oil a couple years ago. The oil inside the compressor was pushing 25 years old but was clean?? Once I changed oil to synthetic it starts with out a problem, before if you did not heat the case the breaker would trip! Not sure they even had this oil 30 years ago but I put it is and never had a problem using it. Great cold starts no difference then summer starts.
 

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I had problems with winter starting my 5HP compressor and of course they want you to use 30wt Non Detergent oil. I crossed my fingers and went with 30 wt synthetic oil a couple years ago. The oil inside the compressor was pushing 25 years old but was clean?? Once I changed oil to synthetic it starts with out a problem, before if you did not heat the case the breaker would trip! Not sure they even had this oil 30 years ago but I put it is and never had a problem using it. Great cold starts no difference then summer starts.
Before I moved my shop compressor into a heated building I'd run 20wt synthetic in the winter and switch to 30wt in the summer. I bought a compressor for my barn a couple of months ago and switched it to 20wt synthetic, I haven't had any issues with it starting on 17 degree mornings.

Specifically; I run Amsoil ISO 46 oil in the winter and Amsoil ISO 100 oil in the summer.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
The oil and the rust level in the crankcase would lead me to believe that there was a fair amount of water in the oil, not really uncommon, but I'd be concerned that every bearing/journal surface would be worn. Perhaps worn a lot like the oblong wrist pin hole on the connecting rod. I'd probably just order all new crank, con rods, main bearings etc.
The gasket kit that I purchased came with of course all the gaskets needed, valves, main bearing, and piston rings. I took apart the LP side and it looks in good shape. Crank seems fine. Really don't want a ton of money wrapped up in this thing. I'll clean all the old oil/residue off everything before I put it back together. :bigthumb:
 

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Considering the overall condition are you concerned at all about the integrity of the tank itself? Sandblasted and repainted is one thing-protects the exterior from further degradation but what about the condition of the interior and it’s press rating vs. being tested?

That would be a significant concern for me on a unit in such condition.
 

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Considering the overall condition are you concerned at all about the integrity of the tank itself? Sandblasted and repainted is one thing-protects the exterior from further degradation but what about the condition of the interior and it’s press rating vs. being tested?

That would be a significant concern for me on a unit in such condition.
I would at least use a camera to take a few pictures inside the tank and look at the steel for rust/pitting ect. I would be more concerned about the lowest part from water not being drained. I have seen tanks rusted thru on the bottom. I leave my tank leak just a tiny bit on the drain so I don't forget. It drains the tank in a couple days so not a big flow of air. Water can freeze in my tank in my shop then you can't tell if there is a water build up. Just me but I hate standing next to my tank when it is about ready to shut off around 140-145 PSI it does have a blow off valve and it works found out adjusting the pressure switch just above 150 PSI it goes off. They have cheap bore scope cameras that are on a extension for I Phones you could look inside I have one I bought for my Daughter that was like $10.00 on sale.

Here is one for $16.00 be great to look inside engines, radiators, hydraulic fluid pans ect.https://www.amazon.com/USB-Borescope-Endoscope-Android-Inspection/dp/B074KXB3JM/ref=asc_df_B074KXB3JM/?tag=hyprod-20&linkCode=df0&hvadid=198103677721&hvpos=1o1&hvnetw=g&hvrand=6771150069289250815&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9033694&hvtargid=pla-371040107488&psc=1
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Considering the overall condition are you concerned at all about the integrity of the tank itself? Sandblasted and repainted is one thing-protects the exterior from further degradation but what about the condition of the interior and it’s press rating vs. being tested?

That would be a significant concern for me on a unit in such condition.
It was for me at first but after some close examination, most of what looks like rust on the tank is staining from the motor mount rusted above the tank. Not to say that the tank isn't rusted. Just that it appears worse than it is. What is rust is just surface, no pitting. Also I found out that this tank is heavy with nothing on it. I wouldn't be surprised if it's at least 3/16"-1/4" wall. Don't know what typically is used for thickness on air tanks but the husky with motors is lighter than this one with nothing on it. I'll have to look into getting it inspected but I'm not that worried.
 

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Not sure but a OXNARD Welding place or other tank re/fill place may hydro test it for you. That is about the only way you can test it. For my Fresh Air Tank it is around $125.00 if I remember right. I have a fire fighter fresh air set up and it has to be tested to be re/filled again when needed. Course it is like 3,000 PSI when filled but they won't touch it unless it is current. You should be able to see by eye if the tank is all rusted more then surface rust looking inside the tank.

Looks like you can test it yourself with it full of water and no air. That way it does not explode if it fails cause water is non compressible and the air part is outside the tank. Good article on it.https://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/general-archive/air-compressor-tank-inspection-94599/
 

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Find out who does your cylinder testing nearby. A place that handles gasses can do a hydro test easily. So does any place that does fire extinguisher testing. Both should be very reasonably inexpensive and give you a lot of peace of mind.
 

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We had three IR's where I work that I had had to do maintenance on.
I think two were 20 horse and one we still use in our warehouse is a 10.
The valves on the three of these were circular stainless pcs that are certainly a little better design.
I sold the two larger ones to a local place that buys and sells equipment. We used to use them for backup and storage for our 50 horse rotary screw that provided service for 27 years (Gardner Denver).
I recently installed a new GD 50 horse variable and set up the old rotary to be able to bring into place and plug in for backup if needed.
On the reciprocating machines we had the option of changing the operating parameters to continuous if demand was high. Instead of the machine start and stopping it would keep running and use air pressure to hold the valves open and the machine would just windmill at no load until you reached your target cut in pressure and the valves would be free to allow compression again.

We finally have an air dryer now. I went through hell with nuisance pneumatic problems due to water and rust particles over the years.
 

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More capacity would be good but I don't think I'll need it. I would run out of air with the husky because of the tiny 10 CFM at 90 psi capability. The Ingersoll should give me 20-25 CFM at 125 PSI. Huge difference. Plus I told my financial committee that I could sell the Husky to fix up the Ingersoll. So she overrules me and the frivolous spending GTT members. :lol:
What she doesn't know won't hurt her. :laugh:
 

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Discussion Starter #20
New connecting rod came in. Actually has a bronze bushing. :bigthumb:

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Anyone have a suggestion as to what to use to clean up the internal housing of the pump. I was thinking of just using brake cleaner and several rags.

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