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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Our tractor is used nearly everyday, we've used it for 2 years. In the fall/winter/spring, I occasionally rev up the 1025R to scoop dirt/stone, or with the 5ft box blade, or pushing snow. But I do think I'm in idle speed for nearly 99% of the time.
Now when summer comes, my wife mows and it's running at PTO speed..
I don't know why I just thought to ask about my fall/winter/spring RPM right now.. like the first couple days of spring.
 

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I use my 1025R at 2500 to 3000 (mostly 3000) all the time I am using it, except when using the MMM. then I run 3200 rpm. It mows the very best at 3200 RPM speed. Lugging any engine is not good and will cause more wear to it. As an example my mower, an LX279 is 22 years old. It has been run at full throttle for all those years and still doesn't use any oil.
 

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I think you will find the tractor runs smoother and likely is even more fuel efficient and will smoke a little less if you run the engine at least 2,000 or more RPM's when doing tasks. Otherwise you risk lugging the tractor where the load is enough to slow the engine speed and that's not good on the engine. I find myself doing many basic things at idle or just above, but not for very long. I usually do it while the tractor is warming up.

It's also possible to stall the engine if the load gets to be too much, which you want to avoid. You may want to consider the option where you connect your directional pedals to the throttle cable so the engine speeds changes automatically with the tractor speed demand, just like an accelerator pedal in your daily driver. Then your RPM's would be going up and down as you are operating the pedals.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
cool info. I don't lug the engine, i'll rev it up for those brief time, but even if I don't hear it, it may be on the edge and practically be the same as lugging.
I tend to be slow at my tasks with all the rugrats around to keep an eye on them when i'm about to be in motion. I find high gear at idle speed an adequate pace, except for what I mentioned in the OP, but I'm glad I'm asking you guys. I'll be breaking my habit on this. lol.
 

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A tractor with a hydrostatic transmission needs to run at least 3/4 throttle to get full torque from the transmission, which is really what is doing the work. You may get full hydraulic pressure just off idle, but you don't get full hydraulic flow. I don't see how you can even use the tractor at idle, in high range, you're not going to move past a medium walking speed, and a loader would move so slow and lift so little you'd soon be using a shovel to get the work done faster.

Crank that engine up to 3/4 to full throttle. It isn't going to hurt a thing and you'll be surprised how much more power you have available.
 

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Three (3) grand is the speed I normally run at when working. 2 grand is moving around the yard, and WFO when on the street.
 
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Yeah you should not be loading your engine at idle, give it some beans then put it to work. About the only thing I use idle for, on ANYTHING, is warmup/cooldown and just to move around short distances.
 

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Yeah you should not be loading your engine at idle, give it some beans then put it to work. About the only thing I use idle for, on ANYTHING, is warmup/cooldown and just to move around short distances.
You'll have to explain that to all the guys with the new 2-series with auto-throttle. All the videos I see everyone is putting around at near idle doing loader work and such.
 

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I'm pretty much at a min of 2200, if I'm doing anything other than sitting there warming up/cooling down. When doing more than just relocating the tractor, generally it's at 2500-3200(if using PTO). My determination of how high it is runs when not doing PTO work is usually related to ihow loud I want it/if I'm wearing hearing protection...
 
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You'll have to explain that to all the guys with the new 2-series with auto-throttle. All the videos I see everyone is putting around at near idle doing loader work and such.
Lol. Well it's their engines, not mine. With my 1025R I deliberately do most things in high range just to make the engine grunt. I do not overload it, just make it work, there's a big difference there. It's a brand new tractor so about the first week I had it I took it over to the main road and started mowing the county's ditch with it, in high range and travelling a little too fast. Reason being, I wanted to make the diesel work hard for a few minutes to help seat the rings. Just for a few minutes, then back to easy work and eventually a cooldown at idle before shutting down.

Engines are made to WORK, not putz around. If you wanna putz around buy one of them silly electric vehicles lol. Even my truck with nearly a quarter million miles on it I put the pedal to the metal often.

Now, note for anyone reading this that doesn't know otherwise: Always follow the recommendations in your manual. Some engines/equipment specifically advise NOT to operate at full load for xxx amount of time.

Of course I can think of at least one instance where following what the manual said was impossible. My pressure washer. Manual says something like "do not operate at full load for first 25 hours"... umm, okay, how do you expect me to do that!? It's a gas pressure washer, it literally runs at one speed (fast idle) and it's either at full load (when holding down the trigger) or in bypass (not holding down the trigger) and like any pressure washer you cannot leave it in bypass for long because without water flowing through it will overheat the pump. So tell me again how to avoid full load? LMAO!
 

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What everyone is saying here is correct, but don't be discouraged or think you have harmed the engine too much already. If you maintain it well and bump your RPMs up a little from here on out then all it has cost you is that you will probably just get 9800 hours out of it instead of 10,000.

Mine idles pretty high anyway, ~1300 I think, so putzing around without a load isn't doing much harm. Idling in high range might be a little much so bump that up to at least 2000 I would say and you'll be fine. Just remember to mash the throttle up before doing any real work. Lugging the motor to a near stall once is worse than idling around the driveway all day.

That is all just my opinion, however. I have yet to keep a tractor long enough to notice any real wear.
 

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Agreed. What's done is done and you probably haven't hurt your machine in any meaningful way yet, so just amend your habits in the future. (y)
 

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My throttle speed varies. Warming up/cooling down I will idle in and out of the garage. If I am putzing around I bump the throttle up a little just so I am going somewhere and I am almost alwas in high. Plowing snow depends on the snow. Heavier and deep or wet and I could be as high as pto rmps. Lighter snow and its throttled up to easily throw the snow off the plow.

Moving or digging in hard dirt and its low gear, 4x4 and throttle up to pto idle. I want full power of everything. When I get a full bucket and depending on how far I am going, taking in consideration the weight in the bucket I will throttle it down just a touch. Usually put it in high gear and then go. Low is too low if I am traveling from the back of my property to the front. I don't go fast so I am beating up me or my tractor. Common sense speeds! Lol.

I leave the throttle up even though I am not going fast because I want the max hydraulic pressure while traveling with a heavy bucket load. Even with a heavy load on the forks. Easier on everything to run it at a higher rpm.

I hear what your saying about kids or people being around. Mine is usually our dogs. I usually make them go inside unles my wife is out watching them. My nephew has his own tractor and we do work when he comes over but it's a controlled situation.

So give your idle a little bump and blow out the soot! Your tractor will thank you!

Good luck!
WB 🚜🇺🇲
 
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I run the 2025R at 2,000 rpm, just above your 1,600 rpm "idle" speed on the 1025R for most FEL work. Digging in dirt needs full hp, 3,000 rpm or more. Run PTO stuff at 2,500 rpm. Don't need all that hp. Need a 2019R.

Ralph
 

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I don't like idle speed for moving the tractor around. I wish mine would idle a hair lower though. My 2305 idles lower than my 1026R does. But the 1026R PTO rpm is 3200 versus 2800 for the 2305.
 

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My 4010 came with the idle set at around 1,300 rpm. I was able to adjust it down to 1,000. Tried it on the lemony 1025R that I had for nearly 2 years but could not seem to change it easily. Very annoyingly high at 1,600 rpm. The 2025R's is 1,300 rpm, not too bad, but I don't "run" it ever at that speed.

Idle speed running is for those big engined tractor lovers who seem to be deathly afraid of revving their engines above idle. Nice to be so quiet, but an electric one would be better for that.

Ralph
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Nice to be so quiet, but an electric one would be better for that.
There's no fear of revving up when I have FEL work or an implement, but you're right, i liked the pace and that I could hear around me. I may have traveled with weight at idle speed, though.
Today I was at least hitting 2300 and higher for puttering around. I'm only at idle for a few seconds after starting it today. I was afraid this may have been a hard habit to break. :) I'll be A-OK. lol
 
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