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A couple of weeks ago, back when gas was affordable, I filled the ol Ferd up, and got some gas for the John Deere while I was at it. I've been running premium since I got it, but this time I put in regular and it's been giving me attitude ever since.
 

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Probably has some water in it. Have you checked your cans?
 

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I've been running regular grade gas since '83 without any fuel related problems. This is "ethanol" fuel, but I also add Sta-Bil each time I fill my fuel can.

You could have water in your fuel can, whether stored outdoors or indoors. Temperature changes create condensation on the inside of the can...fuel tanks also! The lesser the amount of fuel in the tank, the greater amount of condensation that can form.

As far as regular or premium grade fuel, check your owners manual. Bob
 

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Regular gas isn't going to burn as well as premium. Never mind the ethanol, think 87 octane vs 93 octane. I bought some non-ethanol 89octane once and didn't say anything. The boys could tell the difference in the machinery.
 

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Regular gas isn't going to burn as well as premium. Never mind the ethanol, think 87 octane vs 93 octane. I bought some non-ethanol 89octane once and didn't say anything. The boys could tell the difference in the machinery.
very common misconception but its all about the fuel blend and the configuration of the engine burning it .....but lower octane by definition more explosive (volitile) than higher octane (less volitile) ......just a clarification
 

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I don't run regular fuel in any of my small engines. It's premium only and I'll put Sta-bil, or Sea Foam, in as well. I agree that it could be condensation, or the scum left over from ethanol added fuel, or a combination of both. The cheapest and easiest solution is to put a full dose (enough for 5 gallons of gas) of Sea Foam in the tank and run it to see if it clears up. I've tried this a couple of times with small engines that have had ethanol fuel left in them for over a week or two, with great success. Then fill it with premium. Good Luck.
 

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If your timing isn’t just right then 87 can cause running issues. I think it’s high octane allows slightly more timing advance then regular.

My old turners was way overdue for a valve adjustment. If I ran regular it would misfire, it was fine with super.

Should it effect running? No.

Can it? Yes.
 

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A couple of weeks ago, back when gas was affordable, I filled the ol Ferd up, and got some gas for the John Deere while I was at it. I've been running premium since I got it, but this time I put in regular and it's been giving me attitude ever since.
What model we talking about?
 

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very common misconception but its all about the fuel blend and the configuration of the engine burning it .....but lower octane by definition more explosive (volitile) than higher octane (less volitile) ......just a clarification
Selecting the Right Octane Fuel

According to this that isn't exactly correct either.
 

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Selecting the Right Octane Fuel

According to this that isn't exactly correct either.
not being argumentative...but i thought the link fully supported what i posted, but i may not be exactly correct in my terminology for sure

higher octane fuels are less explosive and slower burning (that is what the octane rating is measuring)........IE if diesel was rated in octane instead of cetane it would certainly be much higher than any gasoline or achohol

higher octane fuels burn slower and are less explosive so they can be used in higher compression engines etc...one of the reason sometimes older engines run better on high octane fuel is because of cylinder carbonization that can cause pre-detonation which robs power and can helped by a slower burning less explosive fuel (higher octane)

i am not a expert in fuels ...my knowledge on the subject come from years of racing and discussions with experts.....that said i am not going to try to defend,argue or explain something in detail i am not a expert on. so this can serve as a point of research for any that might want to investigate further.

:greentractorride::good2:
 

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not being argumentative...but i thought the link fully supported what i posted, but i may not be exactly correct in my terminology for sure

higher octane fuels are less explosive and slower burning (that is what the octane rating is measuring)........IE if diesel was rated in octane instead of cetane it would certainly be much higher than any gasoline or achohol

higher octane fuels burn slower and are less explosive so they can be used in higher compression engines etc...one of the reason sometimes older engines run better on high octane fuel is because of cylinder carbonization that can cause pre-detonation which robs power and can helped by a slower burning less explosive fuel (higher octane)

i am not a expert in fuels ...my knowledge on the subject come from years of racing and discussions with experts.....that said i am not going to try to defend,argue or explain something in detail i am not a expert on. so this can serve as a point of research for any that might want to investigate further.

:greentractorride::good2:
Octane rating - Wikipedia
 

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Ethanol

I don't run regular fuel in any of my small engines. It's premium only and I'll put Sta-bil, or Sea Foam, in as well. I agree that it could be condensation, or the scum left over from ethanol added fuel, or a combination of both. The cheapest and easiest solution is to put a full dose (enough for 5 gallons of gas) of Sea Foam in the tank and run it to see if it clears up. I've tried this a couple of times with small engines that have had ethanol fuel left in them for over a week or two, with great success. Then fill it with premium. Good Luck.
Analogous to these comments regarding ethanol, my old echo trimmer, blower, etc were hard to start and ran badly. A friend told me to use preblended 92 octane ethanol free gas and now they all run like brand new!
 

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it's not the octane, it's the ethanol or potential contamination (water) that could cause problems.

you don't need octane higher than 87 unless your engine has much higher compression than any gas tractor engine is built with.
 
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