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Discussion Starter #1
Tractor Sypply Co. has replaced Valspar tractor paints with a brand called Majic Paint. I recently watched a video on this paint which was obviously produced & paid for by Majic. Is this Majic paint a new product? It also appears to have some application issues like waiting 24 hours between light coats. That might be ok but they also tell you to mix hardener (there's) into the paint. So adding all the hardner will cause you to throw out all the leftover if you don't calculate the exact amount of paint you need for those single light coats you need to apply every 24 hours until you have three coats in total.

I did see this paint in my Tractor Supply store & was not really pleased by the brand change. Valspar makes the JD paints. But who the hell is Majic ? I think this could simply be a cheaper paint for us & more profits for Tractor Supply. But if you have to toss out all this paint between coats what's cheap about that. Plus all the extra work cleaning up guns & the leftovers. Can anyone comment on this? Please do if you have experience with this product. Inquiering minds need to know.
:nunu::usa:tongue:
 

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But who the hell is Majic ? I think this could simply be a cheaper paint for us & more profits for Tractor Supply.
Exactly. Lowest bidder. Buy the JD stuff, expensive-but worth it IMHO.
 

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I have used the new TSC Magic paint. It is crap. I agree with Kenny, spend the extra and buy JD paint. It will save money in the long run. I think I saw Valspar paint in Lowes the other day, but I don't know if they have JD colors.

Don
 

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I also agree that the majic paint is total garbage. Both of my local TSC stopped carrying Valspar halfway through a paintjob on a 110 garden tractor. I finished the project with the Majic paint, and now it looks like crap on those parts, while the parts with the Valspar still look really nice. When i get around to repainting those parts, ther paint will come straight from Deere.
 

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I never used the Majic paint, but have seen it at TSC recently. I can say the JD paint is excellent quality and worth the price. It isn't like it costs much more than the TSC paint anyway.

I have a table I built for a metalworking lathe. The tabletop is a large piece of 5/8" steel plate, and the legs are 3" OD by 1/4" wall tubing. There are also a few other parts on it to hold the lathe drive and some other items. Anyway, I painted it with JD green left over after I rebuilt my 40U 10 or 11 years ago. The table is always covered in oil and metal chips, burning hot swarf is constantly laying on it, and I've dropped all kinds of lathe chucks and tools on it, and there is not even a nick in the paint.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Well I guess gross margins & accountants determine what products will be bought stocked & sold. I guess the bean counters at TSC coulden't care less about customer satisfaction. Im just wondering now if they get a lot of complaints from customers about Majic paint & start seeing sales go down the drain, what will they do next?

Also if you watch that Youtube video where they paint a 1957 ford tractor, you hear them stress over & over again about how the paint needs to be applied. If you follow it exactly I don't know how anyone can claim a savings on material costs. Looks like a load of smoke & mirror crap IMHO. I know I won't use it. I put to darn much effort in the pre paint prep to do the job more than one time without going MADDOG on myself.
:lol::laugh::lol::laugh:
 

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Majik paint

I've used both, the Malik is not a bad paint at all, I used 3 gallons of red oxide primer the other day, bought 2 from tsc and one from asc (agri). The only problem I had with the paint was all the oxide settling to the bottom of the can....made it really hard to mix, had to use thinner to spray, a lil bit more that they said, you only have to put hardner in if you want faster dry times. I also sprayed two gallons of color, nh blue, the color looked perfect, didn't have the buildup in the bottom of the can with the color, paint applied smooth, good adhesion, looks very good for a single stage paint. I was painting a flatbed trailer, if it were a restore project I woulda used jd paint, but this is implement paint, worked great for me...
 

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I believe that the Majik brand paint is soybean oil based as opposed to traditional mineral oil products. Obsolete by today's standards that use polyester or epoxy components with a catalyst for strength, chip resistance and color stability.

Not to take anything away from older formulations that could be used with great results. My grandfather could paint like nobody I've ever seen. He could lay down enamel or lead paint with a fine brush or roller that looked like it was sprayed-on.
 

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I used majic paint quite a few times and have been happy with the result as long as I ran it through a sprayer and not out of a rattle can. The rattle cans are mixed extremely thin and have a tendency to run plus the nozzles tend to lay too heavy of a coat so you have to move it fast.

Being an oil based enamel it is pretty much the same as a can of rusteoleum. If you thin it down with mineral spirits and add a touch of hardener it seems to lay down pretty good. I paint a ton of my farm implements with it and needless to say I put minimal prep into it. If I can' get it off with a power washer it is getting sprayed over. For the most part I have had very minimal peeling or flaking and it hasn't faded terribly even though some implements sit outside 12 months of the year.
 

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I believe that the Majik brand paint is soybean oil based as opposed to traditional mineral oil products. Obsolete by today's standards that use polyester or epoxy components with a catalyst for strength, chip resistance and color stability.

Not to take anything away from older formulations that could be used with great results. My grandfather could paint like nobody I've ever seen. He could lay down enamel or lead paint with a fine brush or roller that looked like it was sprayed-on.
I painted my trailer all by brush. Used a 2" "Purdy" brand brush. It suits me fine and dandy. :bigthumb:
I also used genuine John Deere paint.
 

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It is decent paint but for just a little more at napa you can buy there implement paint and it is a lot better it requires fewer coats and sprays nice I can't say anything about jd paint I have never used it I have use the valspar with good results but was disappointed with the majic and with any enamel hardener will give you a shinier more durable and obviously harder finish

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I537 using Tapatalk
 

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I painted my trailer all by brush. Used a 2" "Purdy" brand brush. It suits me fine and dandy. :bigthumb:
I also used genuine John Deere paint.
Snazzy! :good2:
 

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I was a bit upset last year when I went to get some paint and didn't see any Valspar on the shelf. I've been using the Valspar implement paint from TSC for years and had excellent success with it.

I did end up buying a spray can of black of the new stuff for touching something up but not enough use to see how it really compares to the Valspar. I don't have any Deere dealers around here so I am stuck with TSC's low bid.
 

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I recently restored a 1020 John Deere and opted to use the Majik Paint. I saw the videos and was impressed so I used it. At the beginning, it looked BEAUTIFUL, but since it has been exposed to the sun and worked over the summer, it has faded. I really wanted a durable paint, but will go with another brand IF I ever paint it again.
 

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I recently restored a 1020 John Deere and opted to use the Majik Paint. I saw the videos and was impressed so I used it. At the beginning, it looked BEAUTIFUL, but since it has been exposed to the sun and worked over the summer, it has faded. I really wanted a durable paint, but will go with another brand IF I ever paint it again.
Welcome to GTT.

That is a common complaint with this brand, sorry to say it but I just don't understand the thought process of going through the effort of "restoring" a tractor and then cheaping out on the very thing that everyone will look at first. Buy the JD paint, yes it costs more but with all the prep work involved it just makes sense to use the best stuff available.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I recently restored a 1020 John Deere and opted to use the Majik Paint. I saw the videos and was impressed so I used it. At the beginning, it looked BEAUTIFUL, but since it has been exposed to the sun and worked over the summer, it has faded. I really wanted a durable paint, but will go with another brand IF I ever paint it again.
Welcome to GTT.

That is a common complaint with this brand, sorry to say it but I just don't understand the thought process of going through the effort of "restoring" a tractor and then cheaping out on the very thing that everyone will look at first. Buy the JD paint, yes it costs more but with all the prep work involved it just makes sense to use the best stuff available.
Kennyd is absolutely correct on this issue. I believe Valspar is still the current paint manufacturer for JD & it's the best I've ever used in my HVLP spray gun & in rattle cans. The prep work that you do to get a correct paint finish is so time consuming that buying a $4. off brand at TSC vs. The JD brand at $9. a can, may be hard to justify- until the painted surface has been around a while. When you see the difference, the cost objection goes away. As they say, divorces are expensive, but worth every penny in the end. Same with quality paint.

:greentractorride::bigthumb::gizmo:
 

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I've used Magic paint for a few years now painting my implements that sit out year round. Overall I'm satisfied with the paint for that specific purpose.

I ran it through a sprayer and prep for the implements was nothing more than spraying down with Trisodium Chloride and hitting it with the power washer.

Reduced the paint down with mineral spirits about 30%, added some hardener and ran it through the sprayer at about 55 PSI. I was spraying outside so I didn't care about overspray because it just blew away.

The paint seems to be holding up well so far. Eventually it fades but my implements sit outside in the elements year round. For the abuse the paint takes from the elements at the price it cost I been content with it.

I don't particularly like their rattle cans. The paint in my opinion seems heavily reduced so it has a tendency to need multiple coats and tendency to run.

As others have said if doing a restoration that you are doing a ton of prep work for it only makes sense to go with a higher grade paint. If I was looking to make a show tractor I would probably go with PPG or Dupont but I'm just using it to keep my implements maintained.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I've used Magic paint for a few years now painting my implements that sit out year round. Overall I'm satisfied with the paint for that specific purpose.

I ran it through a sprayer and prep for the implements was nothing more than spraying down with Trisodium Chloride and hitting it with the power washer.

Reduced the paint down with mineral spirits about 30%, added some hardener and ran it through the sprayer at about 55 PSI. I was spraying outside so I didn't care about overspray because it just blew away.

The paint seems to be holding up well so far. Eventually it fades but my implements sit outside in the elements year round. For the abuse the paint takes from the elements at the price it cost I been content with it.

I don't particularly like their rattle cans. The paint in my opinion seems heavily reduced so it has a tendency to need multiple coats and tendency to run.

As others have said if doing a restoration that you are doing a ton of prep work for it only makes sense to go with a higher grade paint. If I was looking to make a show tractor I would probably go with PPG or Dupont but I'm just using it to keep my implements maintained.
I'm NO paint expert, but I would like to ad my own .02 here. Reducing or adding 30% Mineral spirits doesn't sound like a really good thing to do. It sounds to me like too much. Off hand if your thinning a gallon of paint for spraying you would ad 16 ounces to thin the ENTIRE gallon. You did not say how much paint your thinning at one time but I would guess your sprayer hold no more than 8-12 ounces on average. So you may be using a lot more thinner than what is actually needed in your spray gun. Also mineral spirits should be the last choice for thinning paint. I'm sorry but for the moment I've forgotten what it is that I use. I think the last thinner I used was Valspar restoration series thinner, but you can also buy a common store brand equivalent.

Hardener is primarily used to accelerate the drying time of the sprayed paint, add a higher gloss to the finish & give the paint a "harder: surface to resist scratching, etc. Hardeners have a very specific quantity that must be added to the paint. Hardeners will not readily mix with paint. They must first go into a mixing cup, then your thinning agent if any & then your paint. The entire batch must then be mixed, remixed & mixed almost constantly for a minimum of about fifteen minutes. Then you let the paint stand for at least a half hour & check to see you do not have any separation of the hardener from the paint & thinner. You may have to do some remixing.

I'm NO painting expert, but I've tried to learn as much as I could about paints. Its a lot more to it than just a drive by shooting. Just my own.02 here. And I do understand what your saying. You don't need a showroom job, but maybe you can get your paint jobs to last longer & better.

:thumbup1gif:
 

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I'm NO paint expert, but I would like to ad my own .02 here. Reducing or adding 30% Mineral spirits doesn't sound like a really good thing to do. It sounds to me like too much. Off hand if your thinning a gallon of paint for spraying you would ad 16 ounces to thin the ENTIRE gallon. You did not say how much paint your thinning at one time but I would guess your sprayer hold no more than 8-12 ounces on average. So you may be using a lot more thinner than what is actually needed in your spray gun. Also mineral spirits should be the last choice for thinning paint. I'm sorry but for the moment I've forgotten what it is that I use. I think the last thinner I used was Valspar restoration series thinner, but you can also buy a common store brand equivalent.

Hardener is primarily used to accelerate the drying time of the sprayed paint, add a higher gloss to the finish & give the paint a "harder: surface to resist scratching, etc. Hardeners have a very specific quantity that must be added to the paint. Hardeners will not readily mix with paint. They must first go into a mixing cup, then your thinning agent if any & then your paint. The entire batch must then be mixed, remixed & mixed almost constantly for a minimum of about fifteen minutes. Then you let the paint stand for at least a half hour & check to see you do not have any separation of the hardener from the paint & thinner. You may have to do some remixing.

I'm NO painting expert, but I've tried to learn as much as I could about paints. Its a lot more to it than just a drive by shooting. Just my own.02 here. And I do understand what your saying. You don't need a showroom job, but maybe you can get your paint jobs to last longer & better.

:thumbup1gif:
I by no means claim to be a paint expert either. I've painted a few cars mostly with single stage acrylic enamels and when those were sprayed I used about 50% mid-temp reducer with hardener with results to my satisfaction.This reducer ratio was 20% less mainly being because I wanted to apply the heaviest coat possible that why I cranked up the PSI through the gun to get the paint to atomize properly.

Personally I found Magic paint a lot more forgiving being oil based than most automotive paints I used. Example. I have an old John Deere grain drill that I recently repainted (last time was 8 years ago with all its time being in the elements). Paint was dull but had not flaked or chipped. Prep was literally getting off what I could with a power washer. The thing has around 40 grease zerks on it with grease caked on in locations from 70+ years of working fields. It would have taken me two weeks to properly prep this thing so sprayed and prayed it would come out. I was fully expecting to get orange peel or fisheyes where grease had been smeared by the power washer but it actually stuck.

For what it's worth every fall the painted areas that have moving parts such as the seed meters get sprayed down with kerosene for preventive maintenance and it hasn't seemed to have any ill effect on the paint.

They say you need to wait 24 hours between coats but didn't have the time. I'm happy with the results. Managed to spray 5 decent sized farm implements in an afternoon. I get what your saying if your going to do something do it right and if it was actually my tractor I probably would but these implements get worked, banged, scratched and exposed to the elements. I just can't justify spending more money on a paint that will probably look just like the magic paint in 8 years.
 

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Hiya,

If your looking for paint that will look like it was just sprayed yesterday 10 years later, there is only one, DuPont Imron polyurethane enamel. After it cures, you can hit a panel with a hammer, the steel will dent and the paint won't chip or crack. I worked at a DuPont distributor years ago, we sold it in 55 gal drums and 275 gal totes to aircraft, ship and construction companys.
 
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