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Discussion Starter #1
All,

At some point I need to plant two 600 foot rows of evergreen trees, and another 200 foot row of evergreens

I don’t foresee needing to dig any footers/post holes in the near future, although future needs are unknown.

From what I can tell a 1025R can tolerate a 36 inch auger very well, and maybe a 42 inch auger if you’re OK with occasional dragging. From what I can tell a 48 inch auger is difficult to manage/transport on a 1025R, but please, anyone with experience, refute or support that claim.

Frost line in my location is 48 inches. I don’t think I can get an auger long enough on my 1025R to dig to the frost line. I understand some folks start the hole with the auger and then finish with manual post hole digger

Would a post hole digger be a good addition to my implements given the stated needs? I do have a 260 backhoee
 

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Great line

I take it you are trying to say stick to my backhoe as the PHD won’t add much?
Depends on the soil. I have had limited luck with a post hole digger and 12" auger on a 3038E. Occasionally it screws itself into the ground and is hellish to extract. I have a friend with a 1025R who bought the same PHD with the same 12" auger to dig pilings for a deck. Before he got a quarter way into the job he got the thing stuck twice and had to get a big tractor from a neighbor to pull it out. It went back to the store.

I can't imaging getting a 36" or 42" auger out once it becomes stuck. Again, it will depend on your soil and I can see that you are trying to optimize productivity, but unless you can borrow one first and satisfy yourself that it'll work, I'd stick with the backhoe. You KNOW that will get the job done.

Al
 

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For that many holes, I'd rent a skid steer with a hydraulic auger attachment. If you had the holes all laid out ahead of time, you can get them all done a weekend. Being able to easily see, more accurate hole placement, down pressure, and reverse are all unlivable advantages.
 

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Here's my County Line PHD on my 1026r when I had that tractor. This is full lift with the full size County Line 9" auger.

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Full depth

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My soil is clay full of rocks. I use mine at idle to dig holes andthe more you use it, the less likely you will be to screw it in, but it'll happen. That's why I bought the reverse kit with torque multiplier :laugh:

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If I screw it in, I just reverse with the pipe wrench it until I can lift it out. It's an aluminum wrench from Harbor Freight.

I use it on my 2032r now and it is easier, but it worked well on my 1026r. As always your mileage may vary, but I wouldn't be without mine. I do not own a back hoe, though.
 

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For that many holes, I'd rent a skid steer with a hydraulic auger attachment. If you had the holes all laid out ahead of time, you can get them all done a weekend. Being able to easily see, more accurate hole placement, down pressure, and reverse are all unlivable advantages.
And this is perfect advice! When I had some fencing done a few years ago the fence guy had a skid steer with an auger - took him maybe two minutes per hole assuming there weren't many rocks. I was just helping a friend yesterday lay 4/0 power cable in a trench (about 1,000') off a spool on his skid steer forks and what did I notice - a hydraulic auger for his Bobcat in his shed. He told me if you need the Bobcat let me know and I'll bring it over with the auger. :good2: .Do a favor, get a favor.
 

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I'll add one more vote for the skidsteer route. You mention planting "trees" but didn't say how you plan on buying those. If you're buying 12" tall seedlings it may not matter but if you are buying taller trees with a root ball, they usually recommend the hole diameter be roughly 3 times the size of the root ball. So even a 6" root ball would require a 18" auger.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
What auger is full size? 43? 48?
Here's my County Line PHD on my 1026r when I had that tractor. This is full lift with the full size County Line 9" auger.

View attachment 624930

Full depth

View attachment 624938

My soil is clay full of rocks. I use mine at idle to dig holes andthe more you use it, the less likely you will be to screw it in, but it'll happen. That's why I bought the reverse kit with torque multiplier


View attachment 624946

If I screw it in, I just reverse with the pipe wrench it until I can lift it out. It's an aluminum wrench from Harbor Freight.

I use it on my 2032r now and it is easier, but it worked well on my 1026r. As always your mileage may vary, but I wouldn't be without mine. I do not own a back hoe, though.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Good point, I know that these trees need to be sunk into somewhat loose and soil, was wondering if this in and of itself made my Bacot a better choice.

That is backhoe
I'll add one more vote for the skidsteer route. You mention planting "trees" but didn't say how you plan on buying those. If you're buying 12" tall seedlings it may not matter but if you are buying taller trees with a root ball, they usually recommend the hole diameter be roughly 3 times the size of the root ball. So even a 6" root ball would require a 18" auger.
 

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Here's my County Line PHD on my 1026r when I had that tractor. This is full lift with the full size County Line 9" auger.

That's why I bought the reverse kit with torque multiplier :laugh:
Hilarious, I literally have the exact same kit. Even with a 12” auger there’s no “pulling it out” once it is at all stuck. Barely sticking? Maybe? :)
 

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In early spring, I moved a spruce tree in my yard. It's trunk base is about 4", and about 7' tall. It's roots grow outward more than deep. I read that the tree shouldn't be in the soil any more than the root ball. That the cover soil should cover the roots, but not any higher up the trunk. I used the backhoe and dug about 15-18" down and roughly 3-4' round. Actually had to backfill a little so the roots weren't too deep. Worked well and the tree seems to be doing good so far, since I moved it in the spring while it was still dormant. In my situation, I couldn't have done it with a post hole digger.
 

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Rent a Skid steer or Toro dingo with an auger. Both are capable of down pressure to get the digger going and reverse since they are hydraulically driven. I have a dingo and rent the post hole digger when I need to. So much easier than a tractor with no reverse capability.
 

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For that many holes, I'd rent a skid steer with a hydraulic auger attachment. If you had the holes all laid out ahead of time, you can get them all done a weekend. Being able to easily see, more accurate hole placement, down pressure, and reverse are all unlivable advantages.
What Kenny said.
Skid steer augers are reversible as well if you get into trouble.

*edit
Oh, he mentioned reversible lol
 

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What Kenny said.
Skid steer augers are reversible as well if you get into trouble.

*edit
Oh, he mentioned reversible lol
Use the hoe. Will be much more fun!

Sent from my SM-N910V using Tapatalk
 

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I have a PHD for my 3025E. I have two bits, a 9 inch and a 12 inch. I have some really cruddy soil, rocks and clay. The 12 inch bit works better for some reason than the 9. I think it is the actual bit on the working end of it, they are different from each other. All the other posters have made valid points. I have planted quite a few trees on property. It's fairly easy to do with the PHD and if the trees do not need to be exactly placed in a row like fence posts than you can go quickly with a rear PTO driven PHD.

A skidsteer with an auger though is absolutely the best solution to the problem. I am not sure how hard it is to remove your backhoe although I have read of some hard luck stories on here. I do know for fact that the PHD can be a royal pain to mount if you don't have a plan. It's just an awkward heavy beast of an attachment. I like the fact that I have one because renting one around here would be a PIA, but it isn't something I use every day. It's just nice to have one available. So if you want the convenience of having one close, then get one otherwise rent one or hire someone.
 

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I used a 12" auger with our 1025R to do a hole for a flagpole last summer (the 3038e was out at the acreage). Even with no rock, just a significant amount of clay, it was really too much to ask of the 1025R. It got the job done, eventually, but only with a lot of nervous moments. The lift capability of the 1025R three point is not enough to handle a full size PHD + 12" auger with load of clay. Contributing to the lack of lift was positioning the PHD support arch for maximum lift (to get the auger point above ground), which increased the moment arm associated with the PHD gearbox. Almost got stuck a few times, but a little back & forth wiggle freed it up (and that was while being careful to try to clear the auger every 6" or so). The pull of the auger getting a bite on clay could literally overpower the up-force on the 3 pt. & I would have to slap the PTO off to keep it from screwing in past no recovery & lifting the front in the process.
 
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