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So, I got a smokin' deal on a a JD 54" blower for my 1025R with all of the quick hitch and mounting hardware. The previous owners only used it a total of 4 times in 3 years. The only downside of the unit is that the previous owners had a gravel driveway, and the inside of the impeller cavity and chute have had most of the paint blasted off by flying rocks. Other than that, it's perfect.

Never a fan of dealing with the cold or snow, I was actually pretty excited to put this thing through its paces. We got hit with another storm last night, and although it isn't a ton of snow, there was enough to justify firing up the tractor to clear the driveways and the end of the cul-de-sac.

The trouble is... It doesn't seem to be throwing the snow far enough. It's almost like the auger and impeller aren't spinning fast enough. I'm running the throttle at the PTO mark on the tach, in 4wd, running the tractor slow..... But it's still not moving the snow far enough. Eventually, the chute clogged and the auger was caked with snow. It's only 15° fehrenheit and the snow is not wet or heavy a so I'm not sure what the issue is.

Obviously, this is my first time blowing snow with the tractor, so I figured I'd check with those of you who have more experience in this regard. Any help or advice is appreciated.


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Sometimes there isn't enough snow to get a good flow going. Maybe try going a little faster to stuff more in it. It's a trial and error thing.
I'd also check any shear pins for breakage.
 

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It has been 3 years since I used a JD snow blower. From what I remember is that blowers do not work well with small amounts of lite dry snow or large amounts of heavy wet snow.
I used a blade on liter snows. As for plugging up, my guess is that your exhaust heated up the blower cage enough to cause the snow to melt inside until it builds up enough to clog the chute.
You need to add a curved extension on exhaust pipe to divert the exhaust away from the blower.
 

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As for plugging up, my guess is that your exhaust heated up the blower cage enough to cause the snow to melt inside until it builds up enough to clog the chute.
You need to add a curved extension on exhaust pipe to divert the exhaust away from the blower.
Interesting....I didn't realize that was a possibility. I wouldn't expect it to be able to warm up that housing from that far away. Does anyone make an add-on pipe to address the problem?



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Is the PTO lever in correct position? I have the same blower and I have it in the rear position. I would also angle top of chute up so it doesn't block flow of snow coming out. Also check for rust in chute, rust will slow flow and could possibly cause the chute to start plugging.:usa
 

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Rocketman,

The advice that goat and ChrisR gave you about not having enough forward speed can lead to the problems you are seeing was correct. The less snow on the ground requires you to keep up the ground speed. The impeller needs snow to push through the chute.

You also described that snow built up around the auger, which can be normal when you have wet snow, even at 15 degrees. My model 59 has had the same problem this winter, even when it was colder. The plugged chute can be a result of low ground speed and wet snow. A quick fix is to spray the impeller housing and chute with silicone.

There have been other posts about the replacement of the plastic impeller with the steel impeller, some as recently as early to mid-February.

Dave
 

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The blower seems to work best with a lot of snow. If there's less than 4-5 inches, I use the blade. I've been spraying the inside with fluid film, and this has worked well in the past. This last snow was very wet and it did not work as well. There was a post a while back where a member waxed all the surfaces inside the blower, including the augurs and chute. He said this worked very well, but this is a job for warm weather. I would also need to sand and repaint some areas before I could use this approach. I get into some rocks occasionally even though my clearing areas are all concrete and asphalt. As was mentioned above, some people use silicone spray as well.

If you store the snow blower in a garage that is warmer than the outside temperature, you must take it outside and let it get cold before getting any snow in it. If it's warm when the snow gets in there, your icing problems will take hold quickly. This is a variation of the exhaust problem.

When the snow is right and there's enough of it, snow blowing is great. You won't run out of room to put snow.
 

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I use my 47" on the 1025r all winter and I've got to agree with the others..

Feed it as much snow as fast as possible.... I'f you're looking at removing only 2 or 3 inches you'll want to go quickly... It's a monster in 8 to 12 inches!!!

Keep the RPMs up...

Add some form of short extension to the exhaust to keep it from blowing on the back of the blower housing... Some use 45° or 90° silicone car heater/water hose.. I use a short section of 1.25" kitchen sink drain pipe...

View attachment 674773

My blower does not like heavy, warm, wet snow... but it throws the cold dry stuff like crazy..

DSCF9704 - Copy.JPG

IMG_0268.JPG
 

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All good advice so far and make sure your auger and impeller / fan shear bolts are intact.
 

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Run the tractor at full throttle. I’ve had the 54” blower since 2011. Have blown all types of snow with it. The only time I have plugged th chute was in a snow bank that was taller than the tractor and the snow had no place to go.

When there’s only an inch or 2 of fluffy snow I do drive faster to get more snow in the blower. But , a lack of snow shouldn’t cause the blower to plug.

If you don’t think the blower isn’t working righ. Check for a sheared shear pin. Sometimes a blower will still work with a broken pin , but will slip with a load. The blower is driven with the mid pto. It uses a chain as a gear reducer. Because of this the engines speed should get pulled down under heavy load. There is nothing to slip unless a pin is broken.

With all that said , my Ariens 13 hp walk behind blower does throw snow noticeably farther than my 54” John Deere.
 

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Add some form of short extension to the exhaust to keep it from blowing on the back of the blower housing... Some use 45° or 90° silicone car heater/water hose.. I use a short section of 1.25" kitchen sink drain pipe...
Be sure to measure your exhaust pipe.
I went to put the 1.25" kitchen sink drain pipe from my 1026R on my new 1025R and found out that they changed to 1.5" so I had to get a different pipe.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Sometimes there isn't enough snow to get a good flow going. Maybe try going a little faster to stuff more in it. It's a trial and error thing.
I'd also check any shear pins for breakage.
It's very possible that it was an issue with there not being enough snow, I suppose. Although, it seemed like it was throwing just fine when I first sat the blower on to the concrete in an area where there was little more than a dusting due to the heavy winds drifting the snow to other parts of the driveway. Once it hit the deeper stuff (still talking less than 6") is when it just seemed like it was barely throwing it from the chute. I'll try hitting with more speed next go-round.
Is the PTO lever in correct position? I have the same blower and I have it in the rear position. I would also angle top of chute up so it doesn't block flow of snow coming out. Also check for rust in chute, rust will slow flow and could possibly cause the chute to start plugging.:usa
Yeah, PTO was definitely in the Mid-only position. Even if it was on Mid-Rear, the RPM at each shaft would still be the same as it would be independently, right? I wasn't bogging the motor down at all until I got into the really deep drifts. I was trying to keep the chute deflector in a relatively straight up position, but it didn't seem like it made a difference. This cable-driven chute deflector is a pile of garbage. I can't wait to replace it with an electric actuator. I'm thinking your comment on the rust hits the nail right on the head here. The previous owner's gravel driveway knocked all the paint off the inside of the chute, and that area has surface rust. I wondered if that would cause an issue before I even began. Looks like the chute will be getting removed, blasted, and repainted this spring for sure.
Rocketman,

The advice that goat and ChrisR gave you about not having enough forward speed can lead to the problems you are seeing was correct. The less snow on the ground requires you to keep up the ground speed. The impeller needs snow to push through the chute.

You also described that snow built up around the auger, which can be normal when you have wet snow, even at 15 degrees. My model 59 has had the same problem this winter, even when it was colder. The plugged chute can be a result of low ground speed and wet snow. A quick fix is to spray the impeller housing and chute with silicone.

There have been other posts about the replacement of the plastic impeller with the steel impeller, some as recently as early to mid-February.

Dave
I wondered if perhaps speed was an issue, but everything I had read kept warning of going too fast with the blower, and that you needed to go really slow to let the blower do the work. Either that was bad advice, or maybe just meant for really deep snow. What type of silicone are people using to spray the auger and impeller? I've seen the posts about the steel impeller from the 47" blower being retrofitted into the 54"....but it seems like the jury is split 50/50 on whether or not it makes a difference. If it wasn't so damned expensive to try, I'd be all over it.
The blower seems to work best with a lot of snow. If there's less than 4-5 inches, I use the blade. I've been spraying the inside with fluid film, and this has worked well in the past. This last snow was very wet and it did not work as well. There was a post a while back where a member waxed all the surfaces inside the blower, including the augurs and chute. He said this worked very well, but this is a job for warm weather. I would also need to sand and repaint some areas before I could use this approach. I get into some rocks occasionally even though my clearing areas are all concrete and asphalt. As was mentioned above, some people use silicone spray as well.

If you store the snow blower in a garage that is warmer than the outside temperature, you must take it outside and let it get cold before getting any snow in it. If it's warm when the snow gets in there, your icing problems will take hold quickly. This is a variation of the exhaust problem.

When the snow is right and there's enough of it, snow blowing is great. You won't run out of room to put snow.
I probably should have used the blade, but I still need to pick up an angling kit for my quick hitch......and I really wanted to use the new toy anyway. What is Fluid Film?
I didn't think about it, but the tractor is kept in the garage. While not temperature controlled, it is insulated, and definitely warmer than it was outside. How long would you think I'd have to let the blower sit outside to acclimate to the temperature before there might be a sticking problem?
I use my 47" on the 1025r all winter and I've got to agree with the others..

Feed it as much snow as fast as possible.... I'f you're looking at removing only 2 or 3 inches you'll want to go quickly... It's a monster in 8 to 12 inches!!!

Keep the RPMs up...

Add some form of short extension to the exhaust to keep it from blowing on the back of the blower housing... Some use 45° or 90° silicone car heater/water hose.. I use a short section of 1.25" kitchen sink drain pipe...

View attachment 674773

My blower does not like heavy, warm, wet snow... but it throws the cold dry stuff like crazy..

View attachment 674775

View attachment 674777
The picture of yours throwing the nice rooster tail is exactly what I was expecting....but didn't really ever see. The exhaust deflector is definitely something to keep in mind for the next storm. I'll have to see what I can do to divert the pipe.
Run the tractor at full throttle. I’ve had the 54” blower since 2011. Have blown all types of snow with it. The only time I have plugged th chute was in a snow bank that was taller than the tractor and the snow had no place to go.

When there’s only an inch or 2 of fluffy snow I do drive faster to get more snow in the blower. But , a lack of snow shouldn’t cause the blower to plug.

If you don’t think the blower isn’t working righ. Check for a sheared shear pin. Sometimes a blower will still work with a broken pin , but will slip with a load. The blower is driven with the mid pto. It uses a chain as a gear reducer. Because of this the engines speed should get pulled down under heavy load. There is nothing to slip unless a pin is broken.

With all that said , my Ariens 13 hp walk behind blower does throw snow noticeably farther than my 54” John Deere.
When you say "full throttle" are you saying I should run at a higher RPM than the PTO indicator on the tachometer (3200rpm)? I too, wouldn't expect a lack of snow to cause an issue. Needing lots of snow to be able to throw it far doesn't make sense, as the momentum of the impeller is what does all the work there. Shear pins all looked to be intact when I did my pre-work check. I attempted to rotate the augers back and forth with the PTO selector in the mid position and the engine off, and nothing seemed to allow me to spin anything, so I think they're ok. I'll check them again tonight. There's only 3, right? One on the end of each auger, and one on the impeller?
Be sure to measure your exhaust pipe.
I went to put the 1.25" kitchen sink drain pipe from my 1026R on my new 1025R and found out that they changed to 1.5" so I had to get a different pipe.
Thanks for the heads-up. I'll be sure to measure before I buy anything.

Thanks for all of the help and advice, everybody. This forum is better than most, in that regard.
 

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Switching attachments on/off is a pain, especially in the winter. I had a rotary broom with the last tractor, 455, and swapping between it and the blower was never handy. I could only imagine it wouldn't be any better with a blade.

I often utilize my blower as a blade and simply push the snow with the PTO disengaged. I push it into a wind row and then come at the wind row with the PTO engaged. Consumes less fuel, quieter, and less wear.
 
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Switching attachments on/off is a pain, especially in the winter. I had a rotary broom with the last tractor, 455, and swapping between it and the blower was never handy. I could only imagine it wouldn't be any better with a blade.

I often utilize my blower as a blade and simply push the snow with the PTO disengaged. I push it into a wind row and then come at the wind row with the PTO engaged. Consumes less fuel, quieter, and less wear.
The only thing to watch out for is you don’t want the blower all clogged up when you turn the pto on. It’s hard on everything.

I have done the same thing to clear infront of my garage, but a blower has always worked fine for 1”-30”
 

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I wondered if perhaps speed was an issue, but everything I had read kept warning of going too fast with the blower, and that you needed to go really slow to let the blower do the work. Either that was bad advice, or maybe just meant for really deep snow. What type of silicone are people using to spray the auger and impeller? I've seen the posts about the steel impeller from the 47" blower being retrofitted into the 54"....but it seems like the jury is split 50/50 on whether or not it makes a difference. If it wasn't so damned expensive to try, I'd be all over it.
I've been using snow blowers for over 40 years. Almost every 2-stage blower needs a certain amount of snow to be able to throw it well. There is no correct speed for all storms, it depends on the depth and nature of the snow.

A good rule of thumb is that the engine should be working a bit to keep up with the load. If the engine is not working, you either are blowing super light powder or you are going too slow. If blowing powder and it is blowing well, then all is good.

If you find it is not blowing well and the engine is not working a bit to keep up, add some speed until the engine is working a little. It should blow much better.

Obviously you don't want to go 11mph with a snow blower but you get the idea.

A small amount of wet snow is a recipe for generating clogs. With small wet snow or slush, you have to give it enough to work with or you may clog. Give it as much as the engine can take without lugging and you'll do OK.


One last tip. If you have just a few inches of snow and you can't go fast enough to feed the machine what it needs, use the blower (with PTO off) as a snow push until you've accumulated as much as it can push/hold, then back off, start PTO and drive into the pile you just made to blow it away (slowly because you now have a pile).

Hope this helps,
Thumper
 

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When you say "full throttle" are you saying I should run at a higher RPM than the PTO indicator on the tachometer (3200rpm)? I too, wouldn't expect a lack of snow to cause an issue. Needing lots of snow to be able to throw it far doesn't make sense, as the momentum of the impeller is what does all the work there. Shear pins all looked to be intact when I did my pre-work check. I attempted to rotate the augers back and forth with the PTO selector in the mid position and the engine off, and nothing seemed to allow me to spin anything, so I think they're ok. I'll check them again tonight. There's only 3, right? One on the end of each auger, and one on the impeller?

I run my tractor at full throttle or wide open when blowing snow or mowing. I’m not really sure what the rpms are. I have an early 1026r. With the throttle all the way forward, with no load my tachometer reads a couple hundred rpms over the pto mark. Put a heavy load on the blower or mower and the rpms drop to or below the pto mark on the tachometer. I don’t pay much attention to what the tach reads . I just go by the engines sound . If it’s lugging I slow down. If there no load on it I speed up. There may be a bit of learning curve to it. It’s kinda like driving a manual transmission you do it without thinking about after awhile.

I think there is 3 shear pins on the blower. I have only sheared the pins on the first stage. It’s possible the pto clutch on the tractor could be slipping. I don’t know much about the pto clutch as I have never had to work on mine.

It’s possible your blower is working fine. Like I said earlier my walk behind blower throws snow noticeably farther than my tractor. The Deere throws snow 15-30 feet. My Ariens with throw snow 20-40 feet. The Deere can’t throw snow completely across my driveway on the first pass. The Ariens can.
 

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The reason why feeding a blower is so important is because when properly loaded it makes the snow work like a liquid, and not compress as much when pressurized by the impact of the impeller, thus keeping the energy transferred as motion.

Think of it like hitting a baseball or a whiffle ball, One moves further then the other with the same input, density is the biggest difference.

It sounds like you run yours properly. You want to be just bogging the engine for maximum power, but nearly full rpm still. Serious bogging is different.
 

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The reason why feeding a blower is so important is because when properly loaded it makes the snow work like a liquid, and not compress as much when pressurized by the impact of the impeller, thus keeping the energy transferred as motion.

Think of it like hitting a baseball or a whiffle ball, One moves further then the other with the same input, density is the biggest difference.

It sounds like you run yours properly. You want to be just bogging the engine for maximum power, but nearly full rpm still. Serious bogging is different.
Heck take a couple Cheap 36" MTD Snow Blowers bolt them together and hang them off the Loaders Fork Lift Frame. Bet it would work pretty good if you did not go fast! Nothing to really hook up and twin Gasoline engines pushing 25+ HP between them. Bet it would look cool going down the driveway blowing both ways tractor in the middle. My old MTD walk behind could cut thru 24" high of snow and blow it 30 ft easy, even bounce stuff off my 2 story windows a few times!!

Guess you could have a new 6 ft wide twin engine powered snow blower for around $1,200.00 or less. Heck it might even work good???
 

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I have an x758 with a 47 blower. I clear snow on 17 properties plus my own. The previous people talking about keeping the blower full are spot on. I run as much forward speed as the tractor will let me. Once it loads up it will keep the speed constant.

I personally think the blowers are a trade off in design. The blowers have a large gap between the impeller and the housing so they wont throw as far as other designs. The obvious benefit is that they are robust in design, allowing gravel to pass through the system easily.

My blower will throw snow across a city street, might not be as far as others but I find it adequate.
 

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You need to feed it snow....

Too little snow:



Enough Snow:

 
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