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Aweful

That's horrible. I've been around hornets, yellow jackets and regular old honeybees but nothing like that.

Treefarmer
 

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I was nearly killed by bees once in the exact same way. I was driving through really tall grass and got hung up on a 55 gallon barrel. I ran and ran and couldn't get away from them. I finally made it to a road and got inside a truck. It was the scariest incident in my entire life.

That was back when I lived in south Texas. The bees were so bad that they would best on the motors on the pivots and prevent them from turning. We had 5 different hives on our house that year alone.


Oh, and my dad got mad at me for forgetting to turn the tractor off...


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WOW! Sounds like a really nasty type of bee.

I remember making the first outside round cultivating the 16 acre field of corn right behind our buildings. I started turning the corner on the west side of the field and noticed one of the first wood fence posts had a swarm of bees on the top 1/4 of the post. The wood was maybe 5-6 inches in diameter but the bee swarm was about 12-15 inches! LOTS AND LOTS OF BEES! The end of the cultivator was only going to be 2-3 feet from the post, I was going to be about 8 feet from the post! Bees always swarmed around tractor mufflers. The heat & vibration attracted them. A stray bee or two was never a problem, that's why I wore seed corn caps. More than three and I WAS OUTTA THERE!

I sure feel sorry for that landscaper and his whole family. Sounds like a very painful and messy way to go.
 

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Thanks for posting this FG.

Wow - just wow. Both the video and article talk about Africanized bees - makes me wonder where they came from or if this is somthing that has always been around and now turning aggressive.

What a frightening way to go......
 

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I was out brush mowing behind my DR Mower last year and went over a wasp or hornet nest. Found out the hard way. I got a couple of bites that really swelled up and took forever to heal. Those are some nasty critters!! Bee careful!!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
No coaltrain, they have not always been here. It is just another of man's messing with the natural fauna, and having an accident happen.

The Great Depression was made far worse, due to the fact native pastures were plowed under, and "better crops" were grown in their place. All fine and good, until nature has her say. When the droughts came, the crops were unable to grow, and with no native grasses still covering that land, no livestock could be raised. The native grasses would have survived the drought, and returned when the rains returned, but alas, they were destroyed to make way for something "better".

Fast forward, and some farmers in Brazil decided that they could import African bees, in hopes of getting a higher yield of honey. Some escaped, and have been migrating north every since.

Playing with Mother Nature will always come back to bite us, it is just a matter of when.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Africanized_bee
 

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No coaltrain, they have not always been here. It is just another of man's messing with the natural fauna, and having an accident happen.

The Great Depression was made far worse, due to the fact native pastures were plowed under, and "better crops" were grown in their place. All fine and good, until nature has her say. When the droughts came, the crops were unable to grow, and with no native grasses still covering that land, no livestock could be raised. The native grasses would have survived the drought, and returned when the rains returned, but alas, they were destroyed to make way for something "better".

Fast forward, and some farmers in Brazil decided that they could import African bees, in hopes of getting a higher yield of honey. Some escaped, and have been migrating north every since.

Playing with Mother Nature will always come back to bite us, it is just a matter of when.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Africanized_bee
fg19; yeah another man made mistake, same as plowing all the pairie grass under, remember the dust bowl. the politians didn't believe it till the dust blew into town. b. jim
 

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No coaltrain, they have not always been here....[snip]
Thanks for the info FG - I find this very interesting.

I recently read a book about the "dust bowl" which took place in the 1930's about just what you said about how they plowed under all the native grass which of course caused those awful dust storms and erosion and how all efforts to restore it all failed. It seem we are still seeing the effects of the era I guess. I find this stuff fascinating - will have to do some more reading about it.

I know a lot of invasive plants have been unknowingly imported over the centuries after studying herbicides. I had a feeling these Africanized bees had been imported but didn't know they basically imported themselves.
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
We deal with KR Bluestem grass in Texas. Another HUGE manmade mistake. Been invading all of the hay pastures around here. Seems to be herbicide resistant, and mowing it makes it go to seed, grow and spread faster. There is a window of season that one can disk it up and under, and slow it down, but if you do it outside of that timeframe, it comes back hardier. :banghead:

Oh, and wiki said 1-2 deaths per year from the bees....we get that many in Texas. A couple of years ago, some horses were killed by a swarm of them, and the owners only escaped by jumping in their pool. Owners were still badly stung, and one had to go to the emergency room, because every time she surfaced for air, the bees were waiting and stung her on the head and face.

I think they are more dangerous than wiki wants you to believe.
 

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fg19;I think they are more dangerous than wiki wants you to believe. U-would think since 1985 that our government which sent people too the moon, could of came up with a answer to the death of these killer bee's-huh! just my.02 cents. big jim
 

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Discussion Starter #12
fg19;I think they are more dangerous than wiki wants you to believe. U-would think since 1985 that our government which sent people too the moon, could of came up with a answer to the death of these killer bee's-huh! just my.02 cents. big jim
Part of the problem is the need to kill the "killer bees" and not harm the beneficial stuff. If you kill off untended fauna, something nasty will fill the void, as nature abhors a vacuum. (Which is one of the reasons weeds and other things sprout and grow between the rows of a garden, etc.)

No matter if it is non-native grasses, carp, Africanized bees, or GMO crops, we somehow never seem to learn that messing with nature is not a good thing. :banghead:
 
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