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Stated to notice I was losing a little hydraulic fluid
Traced it to the power steering cylinder then I saw this.
I have pulled and pushed and I can't make them contact each other - ideas? Looks like it was doing it for a while ?

776164
 

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Stated to notice I was losing a little hydraulic fluid
Traced it to the power steering cylinder then I saw this.
I have pulled and pushed and I can't make them contact each other - ideas? Looks like it was doing it for a while ?

View attachment 776164
I’m betting the shaft is bent.

Does the cylinder move when the axle articulates?
 

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One of the two has to be moving.
 

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Lift the front of the tractor off the ground and check the front axle pivot point to ensure the axle doesn’t pivot front to back which could cause the cylinder to contact the driveshaft when the tractor moves backward. I don’t believe the driveshaft is bent due to uniformity of the wear mark.

Dave
 

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It appears the picture is with the tractor jacked up. When you lower the tractor down to the weight on the wheels, how much closer are they?

It looks to me like the hitch might be pivoting as the wear mark on the shaft is wider than the wear mark on the cylinder.
 

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Just spit balling out loud, here......

I would lower the tractor and then raise and lower the front snow blower without the PTO running and see if the PTO shaft position is changing when you lift the snow blower. That's where I would start as the likelihood of the steering cylinder being "wrong" is very slim.......and having it work correctly.

I am wondering of the Implement shaft on the blower is wrong and its rotating the hitch when raised and lowered. That much wear I would assume is when the blower is down on the pavement its making contact with the steering cylinder as most people don't drive around with the blower raised and it spinning for long periods of time.............they typically turn it off when its carried up off the surface.
 

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The wear is extensive on the steering cylinder which tells me the amount of pressure between the shaft and the cylinder is changing when the blower is being used. Otherwise, to wear that extensively the two would have been tightly pressed together when the blower and pieces were installed, which seems would have been an obvious red flag.

What year is the 1025r?
How many hours are on the machine?
How many hours would you estimate you have used the blower?
Is this the first year for this machine and blower or was it used before?
Was the blower on another machine before this 1025r?
Did the dealer install this or did you put the hitch and blower on the tractor?
 
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The steering cylinder varies based upon the tractors serial number. This has come up when some have noticed their rubber boots on the end of the cylinders were torn or damaged and one cylinder style has the boots available and one cylinder does not have the boots available separately.

Here are screen shots of the steering cylinder and the front PTO shaft. Note the serial number range shown. Since the OP joined GTT in 2018, I am wondering if that's the age of his machine as well. 2018 was in the date range of some of the other serial number specific changes to the 1025r..............

Screenshot_2021-02-22 John Deere Parts Catalog(1).png
Screenshot_2021-02-22 John Deere Parts Catalog.png
 
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The steering cylinder varies based upon the tractors serial number. This has come up when some have noticed their rubber boots on the end of the cylinders were torn or damaged and one cylinder style has the boots available and one cylinder does not have the boots available separately.

Here are screen shots of the steering cylinder and the front PTO shaft. Note the serial number range shown. Since the OP joined GTT in 2018, I am wondering if that's the age of his machine as well. 2018 was in the date range of some of the other serial number specific changes to the 1025r..............

View attachment 776168 View attachment 776169
For how clean stuff looks it must be new. This is the ops 1 and only post. That is not good but hopefully installed by the dealer.

Sent from my SM-N976V using Tapatalk
 
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Wow! That's a new one....

Something must not be setup correctly, and the quick hitch is allowing the driveshaft to raise up into the steering cylinder.

Can't be a bent driveshaft...that would have felt like a jackhammer on the front end!
 
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Some videos to look at in this post:

 
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Running home to check mine. It has to be something with the bearings in the quick hitch support or the mounts. Those 2 bearings in the support bracket hold the end of the shaft straight and set to that weird angle.

Thinking out loud.. did you remember it put into the top rod on the support bracket... it might allow the support bracket to tip and change the angle of the drive shaft..

If the bearings are missing or damage you'd think the vibration would be overwhelming.
 

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View attachment 776176

Here's the rod and support bracket... if the bracket is allowed to tip forward, I would assume the driveshaft would move up hence hitting your steering cylinder.
That was my thought as well, which is why I suggested the raising and lowering of the blower with the PTO shaft off (really as having it on doesn't tell us anything we also won't see with it turned off.......as far as clearance. Plus, its not safe to do anything around that with the shaft spinning and blower moving)..

Earlier, i commented that most people don't drive around with the snow blower raised with it turned on for extended periods of time. What I should have said is "I don't drive around with the snow blower raised with it turned on" simply because I always have the upstop in my mind and how putting the loads on the implement shaft simply aren't useful and can only lead to wear.

Now I am curious, do others also disengage the blower when its raised or carried in the raised position for an extended period of time? Extended period of time would be 10 seconds or longer, probably......
 

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I leave mine running but drop the rpms and only rise the blower an 1 inch off the ground... to your point I want to keep the shift has straight as possible..


I was concerned about wear/damage on the pto clutches by engaging and disengaging.. or that over thinking it 🤔
 

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I would place a jack under the drivers side of the front axle and rais it high enough that the axle is at the pivot stop and then turn the steering from lock to lock and see what the clearance is. I would then do the same with the jack under the passenger side and perform the same tests. After that, I would do it all over again with the Snow Blower in the fully raised position and then again with the blower lifting the front of the tractor in the fully powered down position. Somewhere in these tests, you should find the clearance issue.
 
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One thing for sure, the steering cylinder is going to need to be replaced.

Depending upon the machines serial number, the cost varies widely (roughly 25%). Also, like so many of the illustrations, I have noticed that the machines with the higher (newer) serial numbers look at the parts illustrations from the opposite side of the part as does the same part on a earlier serial number machine.

Not sure why Deere spent the time and money to illustrate all of these views in a different way from those already done, but the entire parts book for the newer machines is laid out differently and in my opinion, harder to use and find things in for some applications.

Illustration for the machine with the serial number 100001 and higher......(newer machines, mostly 2018 and newer time period although some very late 2017's seem to be in this range.)

Screenshot_2021-02-22 John Deere Parts Catalog(2).png



This is the "Cart View" you get when you select the earlier machines, like my 2017. Following this is the screen which shows the part being replaced or subsituted with this new part number of LVA23453 which replaced the LVA17418 part number.

Screenshot_2021-02-22 John Deere Parts Catalog(3).png


This is the view for the 2017 and prior machines. No price or final part number shown, they are in the screen shot shown above this sentence.

Screenshot_2021-02-22 John Deere Parts Catalog(4).png
 
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I leave mine running but drop the rpms and only rise the blower an 1 inch off the ground... to your point I want to keep the shift has straight as possible..


I was concerned about wear/damage on the pto clutches by engaging and disengaging.. or that over thinking it 🤔
As long as the PTO is engaged at low RPMS's that's the best way to avoid the "shock and wear" on the PTO clutch. Would the number of starts and stops wear more than leaving it running over time? Probably, but it would be a small difference I would think as long as the clutch was engaged at low RPM's. If it was a high RPM dump, which I doubt you would do, then it would wear it more quickly. .

Being cautious isn't over thinking it. As long as you are taking reasonable steps to avoid wear and abuse, I think its a good thing, I have seen some carry snowblowers in the fully raised position and you could hear the clunking of the implement PTO shaft. That's not good...........

I have also seen some fully raise the snowblowers when engaged and drive them into snow banks to "chew them down" to move them........Not a good approach. The blowers tend to "walk" side to side chewing on the pile. Its not the right way to use them.

The most aggressive I have done is to undercut the snow banks with the blowers and then lift the blower up when under the part which has been undercut, to cause the snow bank above it to come down in a pile on top of the blower. Then, back up and blow the pile out of the way, keep undercutting into the pile until under it, then lift again.

Using the FEL sure is faster and easier to move the piles, but I didn't have it at the time.
 
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That was my thought as well, which is why I suggested the raising and lowering of the blower with the PTO shaft off (really as having it on doesn't tell us anything we also won't see with it turned off.......as far as clearance. Plus, its not safe to do anything around that with the shaft spinning and blower moving)..

Earlier, i commented that most people don't drive around with the snow blower raised with it turned on for extended periods of time. What I should have said is "I don't drive around with the snow blower raised with it turned on" simply because I always have the upstop in my mind and how putting the loads on the implement shaft simply aren't useful and can only lead to wear.

Now I am curious, do others also disengage the blower when its raised or carried in the raised position for an extended period of time? Extended period of time would be 10 seconds or longer, probably......
It wouldn't (or shouldn't) make any difference if it was up in the stowed position, the long driveshaft is held firmly at a set angle by the hitch, it doesn't change it's angle no matter how high you lift the blower. I've observed this when I install the hitch and driveshaft before installing the blower.
The short intermediate driveshaft changes angle but the long one doesn't budge once the hitch is in place.

Edit: I also don't use the blower raised up any more than it needs to be, Im just commenting on the possibility that this caused the OP's issue, if that was what you were inferring.
 
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My 1026R manual says to engage the PTO at Idle Speed. I do.
 
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