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I just ordered a 1025r with an H120 loader and 60" MM deck from my local JD dealer along with a Land Pride BB1254 box blade, and it's supposed to be ready for pickup later this week. I can't wait to start using it! I'm going to be using it for multiple purposes to include mowing, hauling firewood out of the woods, with some other miscellaneous loader work with dirt and gravel occasionally. One of my first projects with the loader is to use it to dig out an area for a patio paver project I'm working on. From what I've read the H120 loader is pretty strong for the size of the 1025r. That's another reason why I went with the 1025r over the BX2370 was because JD is supposed to have stronger hydraulics. My question is does John Deere under spec the loader lift capacity on these units and will the box blade that weighs 325 lb. be enough ballast on the rear for moving gravel or should I consider putting more weight on the rear since I only weigh 185 lb. myself?
 

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Congratulations on your new tractor purchase! In my experience I have found that a loaded ballast box helps the loader work the best. If you will be moving heavy material you should consider a ballast box. If your property is sloped you will definitely want a ballast box. Good luck and play safe!
 

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Congrats on the purchase

The 325lb box blade is not enough ballast

The manual calls for

A) 601lbs rear hitch ballast & fluid filled rear tires
B) 506lbs rear hitch ballast & three rear wheel weights per side
C) 517lbs rear hitch ballast, one rear wheel weight per side & fluid filled tires
 

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One thing that I think has to be factored in the equation is how far to rear does your implement extend. If it extends 3 feet rearwards, that multiplies the weight effect compared to the ballast box, which is much closer to the hitch arms. I use my 60 inch rear blade for ballast and as I recall, the weight for it is somewhere around 250lbs, but I feel like it is more like an effective 350-400 lbs due to the rearward extension. I also now use an iMatch, which adds some extra weight. That being said, I just recently was able to pick up a ballast box on Craigs List that I plan to fill and use when I want to work in tighter quarters.

Dave
 

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I have an Omni Transformer and 4 100# tractor suitcase weights and I can make the back light when digging. My tiller is in the 560# range and the tractor feels pretty planted.

Sent from my HTC6500LVW using Tapatalk
 

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I use a 335lb box blade, 65lb iMatch, beet juice in the tires and have not had any problems on my 5 acre property - the entirety of which is sloped 10 to 20 degrees. I always use four wheel drive because of the slope. In the last few days I have moved about 50 yards of damp sandy soil. It is heavy enough that the loader cannot lift it more than about 4 ft high when full. I do take it pretty easy with full bucket loads, not because of unloading the rear wheels but because the bouncing of the fully loaded bucket (54") must put an incredible amount of torque on the loader masts.
 

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I opted to use the full set of wheel weights, 170 lbs each wheel, and the OMNI Transformer with 500lbs of suitcase weights (when not using the backhoe). While one can use less weight and still "feel" stable, additional stress is added to the front axle which is not good.

Prior to the wheel weights, there were times I didn't feel the BH alone was enough ballast.
 

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......not because of unloading the rear wheels but because the bouncing of the fully loaded bucket (54") must put an incredible amount of torque on the loader masts.
And the HUGE hydraulic pressure spikes in the cylinders and hoses!
 

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IMHO more ballast is better than not enough. Right when you think you're all set, add some more. My tractors have always seemed to operate best for heavy loader operations when the front almost feels light when the bucket is empty. Traction and steering is excellent when setup this way.:good2:
 

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While one can use less weight and still "feel" stable, additional stress is added to the front axle which is not good.
True, however the amount of load removed from the front axle is equal to only a portion of the amount of weight added to a ballast box (or whatever hangs off the back). If I added 200lbs to my BB it might unload the front axle by 120lbs. Compare that to the amount of force the front axle experiences when the front wheels drop into a pothole with nearly half a ton in the bucket - it's nothing by comparison. In other words, given the choice between extra ballast or extra care when maneuvering, using extra care will be easiest on the front axle (and other parts too). Best to do both of course.
 

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True, however the amount of load removed from the front axle is equal to only a portion of the amount of weight added to a ballast box (or whatever hangs off the back). If I added 200lbs to my BB it might unload the front axle by 120lbs. Compare that to the amount of force the front axle experiences when the front wheels drop into a pothole with nearly half a ton in the bucket - it's nothing by comparison. In other words, given the choice between extra ballast or extra care when maneuvering, using extra care will be easiest on the front axle (and other parts too). Best to do both of course.
I'm not claiming one can add enough ballast to the rear so as to operate the tractor without care. Of course care is needed but so is the appropriate amount of ballast.
 

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I use a 48" BB with a couple of small suitcase weights. I have a quickhitch and fluid in the rear tires.

This is plenty of weight.
 

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I just ordered a 1025r with an H120 loader and 60" MM deck from my local JD dealer along with a Land Pride BB1254 box blade, and it's supposed to be ready for pickup later this week. I can't wait to start using it! I'm going to be using it for multiple purposes to include mowing, hauling firewood out of the woods, with some other miscellaneous loader work with dirt and gravel occasionally. One of my first projects with the loader is to use it to dig out an area for a patio paver project I'm working on. From what I've read the H120 loader is pretty strong for the size of the 1025r. That's another reason why I went with the 1025r over the BX2370 was because JD is supposed to have stronger hydraulics. My question is does John Deere under spec the loader lift capacity on these units and will the box blade that weighs 325 lb. be enough ballast on the rear for moving gravel or should I consider putting more weight on the rear since I only weigh 185 lb. myself?
I bought a new 1025r three days ago - Dealer in Battleground, WA told me the bucket lift war rated for 800 lbs. Happy to say he was being conservative - with a fairly heavy box blade on the rear PTO, I was able to lift a Jet-ski ( using new forks I bought today ) on a large heavy pallet board that the owner said weighed well over 1000 lbs. Wouldn't recommend this every day, as the front tires were squishing quite a bit and I could only lift it about a foot before the hydraulics stalled. But it held and I was able to move it a few hundred feet to new location. Was also very pleased at how well this little guy handled our large heavy box blade - used to drag it behind an older full sized Massey Ferguson farm tractor. The little 1025r handled it almost as well...

Richard
Camas, WA
 
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