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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
So, I finally broke down and bought a 54" Snow blower for my 1026R. Got it all home and started to assemble it and found they forgot to include the mounting bracket that goes on the frame to attach the quick hitch to the tractor (apparently this is included with newer models).

After a lot of back-and-forth with the dealer, trying to get the missing part, I finally got it almost 2 weeks after getting the blower itself. Due to work, I couldn't install the brackets immediately, so I started doing it today. Due to the brush-guard I have, I couldn't use the provided bolts for the front 4 (2 on each side) bolts on the side brackets as they weren't long enough to go through the brush-guard AND bracket, so I used the ones that were already being used to keep the brush-guard on. These bolted on just fine... 140 NM like the bracket install guide said (I'm just a little concerned as they're slightly smaller in diameter). I also put the front bracket on and tightened the bolts to 140 without issue. The other 4 on the 2 side brackets, however, did not go so well.

I set my wrench back to 140 NM (took a short break before tackling the harder to reach bolts) and started to tighten. Right about where I expected the torque wrench to do its signature "Click" to tell me it was tight, I was surprised to find the bolt just kept turning with the same, and then decreasing, difficulty until the bolt broke. So I think to myself "Ok, one bad bolt... let's just try another". That bolt went in and tightened down fine. Next bolt: tightening... tightening... tightening........ Yep, broke again! Replaced the bolt with another (thank god I had spares due to using the brush-guard bolts), start tightening and I can tell this one is going to do the same, so I take it out before it breaks. NEXT bolt! I reduced the torque value to 120 and tighten it to that value, no problem! Adjust the wrench to 130 and no problem again. Up to 140 and we're right back to breaking bolts again. Somehow the bolts can't take the extra 10 NM needed to reach to suggested torque value. It's as if the bolts are made of aluminum rather than steel! Even holding the bolts in my hand, they feel "soft" and are clearly not hardened steel if they even are steel.

Out of curiosity, I decide to check the torque on my loader mount, which is 150 and 310 NM (depending on which one you're tightening), and no problems there, everything's tight; even loosened and retightened a couple, so I know it's not the wrench.

The dealer's response when I mentioned it was "What do you want me to do about it?"; though it sounded like the rep was honestly confused as to what to do about the issue as they just replace any broken bolts when installing the parts themselves, and apparently don't even use a torque wrench, just an air ratchet until "sufficiently tight". The reason I decided to install the blower myself was not only to save some money, but more due to issues with the previous dealer (whom I got the TLB from) not tightening (barely snug, even) the bolts on one side of the loader frame. Sadly, the old saying of "If you want something done right, do it yourself" is becoming more and more true, every passing day...

Anyway, looking at the broken bolts, they appear to keep turning in the nut (and I can easily remove the nut by hand after they break), but are simply stretching until they finally break. My question is: Has anyone else run into this issue while installing the mounting brackets for a front quick-hitch? Is it going to be safe for me to use the blower and hitch with 3 of these 4 bolts torqued to 130 NM, or should I be looking to find some replacements? When I put the 2 pieces of the broken bolts back together, there is a clear "hourglass figure" shape to them where the break happens.

I've lucked out on snow so far, but that can change at any time, of course. Any advice anyone can give me? I'm pretty much just :banghead: right now when I should be :greentractorride:
 
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The dealer's response when I mentioned it was "What do you want me to do about it?"; though it sounded like the rep was honestly confused as to what to do about the issue as they just replace any broken bolts when installing the parts themselves, and apparently don't even use a torque wrench, just an air ratchet until "sufficiently tight". The reason I decided to install the blower myself was not only to save some money, but more due to issues with the previous dealer (whom I got the TLB from) not tightening (barely snug, even) the bolts on one side of the loader frame. Sadly, the old saying of "If you want something done right, do it yourself" is becoming more and more true, every passing day...
It is amazing how many "professional" installers don't torque the bolts to the recommended tightness.

Anyway, looking at the broken bolts, they appear to keep turning in the nut (and I can easily remove the nut by hand after they break), but are simply stretching until they finally break. My question is: Has anyone else run into this issue while installing the mounting brackets for a front quick-hitch? Is it going to be safe for me to use the blower and hitch with 3 of these 4 bolts torqued to 130 NM, or should I be looking to find some replacements? When I put the 2 pieces of the broken bolts back together, there is a clear "hourglass figure" shape to them where the break happens. I've lucked out on snow so far, but that can change at any time, of course. Any advice anyone can give me? I'm pretty much just right now when I should be
What is the size (shaft) and grade of the bolts that you are using?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The bolts are M12 x 45 bolts (the M12x30s for the front bracket torqued fine).

I'm heading to work in a few minutes and will take them with me to check with a caliper, since I don't have my own (to verify their sizes), and see if my supervisor knows any more (he's worked with a lot more steel). The bolts look like quality bolts, but they seem "soft" compared to the brassy looking ones from the brush-guard, which I'm not sure what those are... guessing M10 x 60. I'm really no expert on bolts, I just know the sizes due to working in a machine shop (though we deal with mostly aluminum there so torque values aren't even half as much).
 

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The bolts are M12 x 45 bolts (the M12x30s for the front bracket torqued fine).

I'm heading to work in a few minutes and will take them with me to check with a caliper, since I don't have my own (to verify their sizes), and see if my supervisor knows any more (he's worked with a lot more steel). The bolts look like quality bolts, but they seem "soft" compared to the brassy looking ones from the brush-guard, which I'm not sure what those are... guessing M10 x 60. I'm really no expert on bolts, I just know the sizes due to working in a machine shop (though we deal with mostly aluminum there so torque values aren't even half as much).
What is the hardness markings on the head? According to the chart below from the owner's manual 132Nm is the max for a M12 Class 10.9 bolt.

Torque Values - Metric Hardware

Torque Values (Dry)​
Torque Values (Lubricated)​
Size​
Class 7​
Class 8.8​
Class 10.9​
Size​
Class 7​
Class 8.8​
Class 10.9​
N•mlb-ftN•mlb-ftN•mlb-ftN•mlb-ftN•mlb-ftN•mlb-ft
M6118.11712.5M696.6139.6
M8292135264130M823172518.52921.4
M10594467498059M10443351386145
M1298721138313297M127858836110376
M14147108167123201148M141188712794152112
 

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Discussion Starter #5
The bolts are M12 x 45 bolts (the M12x30s for the front bracket torqued fine).

I'm heading to work in a few minutes and will take them with me to check with a caliper, since I don't have my own (to verify their sizes), and see if my supervisor knows any more (he's worked with a lot more steel). The bolts look like quality bolts, but they seem "soft" compared to the brassy looking ones from the brush-guard, which I'm not sure what those are... guessing M10 x 60. I'm really no expert on bolts, I just know the sizes due to working in a machine shop (though we deal with mostly aluminum there so torque values aren't even half as much).
That would explain it, then. That said, why do I have 132NM bolts for a part that asks for 140NM torquing? Even the directions from JD say to "torque the M12x45 to 140 NM (105 ft lb)". Obviously someone messed up.

Anyway, got some bolts from one of the guys at work, to try. Should be a higher torque value, I'd assume, since they're 12.9s. I'm not sure about the head of them, though. They're a smaller hex-head, with not even half the area to disperse the torque across... Might just skip it and run with the few bolts I have left torqued to 130NM. All I plan to run on the hitch is a snowblower and maybe a broom, anyway.

Below are the directions with a provided bolt (silver) and the one from work (black).

20171108_035231.jpg
 

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The bolts are M12 x 45 bolts (the M12x30s for the front bracket torqued fine).

I'm heading to work in a few minutes and will take them with me to check with a caliper, since I don't have my own (to verify their sizes), and see if my supervisor knows any more (he's worked with a lot more steel). The bolts look like quality bolts, but they seem "soft" compared to the brassy looking ones from the brush-guard, which I'm not sure what those are... guessing M10 x 60. I'm really no expert on bolts, I just know the sizes due to working in a machine shop (though we deal with mostly aluminum there so torque values aren't even half as much).
That would explain it, then. That said, why do I have 132NM bolts for a part that asks for 140NM torquing? Even the directions from JD say to "torque the M12x45 to 140 NM (105 ft lb)". Obviously someone messed up.

Anyway, got some bolts from one of the guys at work, to try. Should be a higher torque value, I'd assume, since they're 12.9s. I'm not sure about the head of them, though. They're a smaller hex-head, with not even half the area to disperse the torque across... Might just skip it and run with the few bolts I have left torqued to 130NM. All I plan to run on the hitch is a snowblower and maybe a broom, anyway.

Below are the directions with a provided bolt (silver) and the one from work (black).

[iurl="http://www.greentractortalk.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=486474&stc=1&d=1510135055"]
[/iurl]
is that a socket head bolt?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
is that a socket head bolt?
The black bolt is an extra large hex-driver (allen-wrench... not sure what those bolt styles are actually called) bolt. I don't much like the smaller head, though, so I think I'll just go with the 130Nm torque on what I have left; until I can find some higher grade ones.
 

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The black bolt is an extra large hex-driver (allen-wrench... not sure what those bolt styles are actually called) bolt. I don't much like the smaller head, though, so I think I'll just go with the 130Nm torque on what I have left; until I can find some higher grade ones.
What is the markings on the head of the silver bolt (hex head)?
 
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I have the mower, front quick hitch, and brush guard. I installed all my own equipment and the bolts that were all too short for this combination. I tired years ago of chasing for fasteners and invested in bins and a fastener assortment, so I had the longer bolts on hand (8.8). I've been turning wrenches since I was old enough to reach my father's tool box. So I have developed a pretty good "feel" for how tight things should be, so I didn't get the torque wrench out for these.

Sometimes you just get bolts that were not the correct alloy mix. I recall a number of years ago when I was doing the routine maintenance on a Chrysler mini-van. I had rotated the tires and I always utilize the torque wrench for the wheel studs. I had several that just "felt" soft, as if they were going to twist off. I stopped when I felt that on all but one. I kept going on the one and sure enough, it twisted off before the torque wrench clicked.

As it was still in warranty, I went to the dealer and demanded all the wheel studs and lug nuts be replaced, as this was the vehicle the wife drove and transported the children within. Of course, I received push-back from the service manager, claiming my torque wrench was off. I brought my torque wrench (a New Britain, 1/2' dial/clicker type, acquired by KD Tools later) to the dealer and we coupled my torque wrench with their lead mechanic's, a Snap-On. We set both to the specified wheel lug nut torque and then applied one against the other. They both clicked at virtually the same interval. Next, they torqued the same wheels studs that I felt were soft with the lead mechanic's torque wrench and two twisted off. They replaced all the studs and lug nuts.
 

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The black bolt is an extra large hex-driver (allen-wrench... not sure what those bolt styles are actually called) bolt. I don't much like the smaller head, though, so I think I'll just go with the 130Nm torque on what I have left; until I can find some higher grade ones.
They are called "Socket Head Cap Screws" abbreviated SHCS. They are not very rust/corrosion resistant but are quite hard.

I would NOT use them in this application, get the proper bolts and use a common torque chart-not the (often wrong) manual.
 

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They are called "Socket Head Cap Screws" abbreviated SHCS. They are not very rust/corrosion resistant but are quite hard.

I would NOT use them in this application, get the proper bolts and use a common torque chart-not the (often wrong) manual.
Agreed 100% with what Kenny said........

The socket head cap screws are often used in machine fixtures (like tool and die assembly) and rarely are they used in external weather subjected vehicle applications.

You want a cap screw hex head bolt so you have the option of torquing either end, depending upon the assembly plus as Kenny said, the SHCS are not treated for weather exposure and will surely rust. There are few bolts which will get more directly subjected to the elements of snow melt, etc. than those on the front hitch and drive assembly when plowing or blowing snow.

Sadly, there is a lot of "junk" hardware fasteners out there as compared to 10 years ago. I invested in a high quality bolt bin of both course and fine thread SAE, Grade 5 and Grade 8 bolts 1/4" x 1/2" through 1/2" x 4" just because of issues like this.

Bolts are designed to stretch (to a degree) to do their job, but lower quality hardware will often shear just as what you have seen. The only good news is that the through bolts like you are using are easy to replace. I broke off a defective bolt in the rear hydro cover case and to remove it and disassemble the case by pulling the cover to get the portion of the bolt broken off in the case. That's the nightmare scenario of poor quality hardware. A 15 minute job turned into 5 hours of disassembly and reassembly to get the broken portion of the bolt out of the case.
 
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Discussion Starter #14
I'll have to go to the hardware store and see what I can find if I break any more, but I'll stick with what I've got right now. As for the stretch, they did go for quite a while before they actually broke. I could tell at least a full turn or 2 ahead of time that they weren't going to tighten any more before they would actually break (was kind of curious and still have a spare good one...). It just seemed quite odd that the install guide says to torque to that value on bolts not designed for it... :dunno:

Anyway, thanks for all the help!
 
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The socket head cap screws are often used in machine fixtures (like tool and die assembly) and rarely are they used in external weather subjected vehicle applications.
The rare exception to this is off road motorcycles. Almost all of the bolts used on the engine are socket head. You don't get much more external weather subjected than this. :)
 
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Agreed 100% with what Kenny said........

The socket head cap screws are often used in machine fixtures (like tool and die assembly) and rarely are they used in external weather subjected vehicle applications.

You want a cap screw hex head bolt so you have the option of torquing either end, depending upon the assembly plus as Kenny said, the SHCS are not treated for weather exposure and will surely rust. There are few bolts which will get more directly subjected to the elements of snow melt, etc. than those on the front hitch and drive assembly when plowing or blowing snow.

Sadly, there is a lot of "junk" hardware fasteners out there as compared to 10 years ago. I invested in a high quality bolt bin of both course and fine thread SAE, Grade 5 and Grade 8 bolts 1/4" x 1/2" through 1/2" x 4" just because of issues like this.

Bolts are designed to stretch (to a degree) to do their job, but lower quality hardware will often shear just as what you have seen. The only good news is that the through bolts like you are using are easy to replace. I broke off a defective bolt in the rear hydro cover case and to remove it and disassemble the case by pulling the cover to get the portion of the bolt broken off in the case. That's the nightmare scenario of poor quality hardware. A 15 minute job turned into 5 hours of disassembly and reassembly to get the broken portion of the bolt out of the case.
Great minds think alike! Most of your hardware store fasteners are now produced in China and with that, China "quality". I put in bins as Sulleybear did for the same reason but, with a bit of a different mixture of fasteners, focusing more on the smaller size machine screws (6-32, 8-32 & 10-32) and metric. I don't have SAE fine thread or grade 8 as I seldom have a need for them. If I had the space for additional bins, I'd probably go with stainless steel assortment next. I have quite a few already, stored in multiple boxes under the workbench.

If you strike out at the hardware store, go to: https://www.northernstatessupply.com/

This is where I acquire most of my fasteners and other hardware from. They're great folks to work with, will process small orders, and have a flat rate shipping fee of $8.00----which is pretty reasonable for ecommerce today.

Also, the hex head bolts you'll typically come across are not a flange hex head as the OEM bolts are. So be sure to pickup some metric flat washers, as well, to place under the bolt head and the nut head (if you have to replace those). This will prevent the corners of the head from digging into the paint and creating a rust penetration point.
 

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The rare exception to this is off road motorcycles. Almost all of the bolts used on the engine are socket head. You don't get much more external weather subjected than this. :)
The primary reason some were saying to avoid the socket head cap screws is because the one in the photo is black oxide plated. Not a great rust-prohibiting coating as KennyD mentioned. Zinc plated ones would be better and it would also be wise to use a washer as another member mentioned. Better still, get some OEM bolts :).

130NM is 95 ft lbs, or within range of passenger car wheel lug bolt torque specs, if that helps. Wheel lug bolts are hard as a coffin nail for the repeated torquing so the JD ones will be a little softer/lighter weight.
 

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Also, be sure to "snug up" all the bolt/nuts before you torque them. If you torque one and the rest are loose, the component holes will not be aligned for the bolts that are loose. This will result in the bolts being cocked and the misaligned surfaces of the components can act as a sheer when you torque the bolts, snapping them off.
 
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