Green Tractor Talk banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello everyone, new around here. I'm desperate for advice. I just purchased a late 2000s model LA145 lawn tractor. Engine looks and runs great. I hopped on it to cut our grass for the first time and in the front yard it did great. Blazed through it no problem..once I got to the back yard where we have a pretty steep grade it simply stopped going uphill. I did the first few passes but the longer I cut, the less it would go uphill until it completely stopped. The guy I bought the tractor from said he got it from a guy who had gotten in too bad of health to mow his own place anymore so chances are it sat for a while unused. The guy I got it from buys tractors like that, tunes them up and flips them.

From my research, I've narrowed it down to a few things and I could use some advice on if I'm going in the wrong direction.

1. Drive belt wearing out and getting loose the more I run the machine.
2. Transmission tension spring getting loose
3. Transmission fluid either A. gunked up B. breaking down after heating up from the tractor sitting for an unknown amount of time.

After it wouldn't go uphill, I cut it off and let it sit for awhile. Went out about an hour later, cranked it up and it drove uphill (slowly) but I got it back to the garage.

PLEASE HELP!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,774 Posts
Sounds like the transmission needs a rebuild. A fluid change might add life but it’s still a band aid.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,886 Posts
All of the items you list are valid possibilities. You should check through them one by one.

Be prepared however. The L/LA/D and now E-series Deere mowers utilize Tuff Torq T40 or T46 transmissions that aren't designed to be serviced. It's a sealed unit. Deere dealers will offer to replace it as a single unit for you but they won't repair them. The cost of doing that is prohibitive.

These things are known for dying and when they do, you get pretty much the exact symptoms you laid out.

There are some videos on YouTube where guys have pulled those transmissions apart and tinkered with them. I have no idea how well they work once they get done.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
20,353 Posts
Could be stripped splines on the input pulley to the transmission. We’ve seen and heard this before as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
68 Posts
The T40 / K46 is not intended for high load operations. On a flat lot, they will run for many years. Throw them at steep hills and they won't last. If you do rebuild yours, how steep your hill is will determine how long the rebuild will last. My yard has an area that is about 50 feet long at a 10 degree pitch (measured ). Plus I hauled wood with it and pulled a plug aerator. Under those conditions, my L118's transmission was good for about 5 years, original and then again after a rebuild. Three years ago I gave it to a cousin who has a flat yard and it's still working. Just doesn't like hills.

Sent from my SCH-I545 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
All of the items you list are valid possibilities. You should check through them one by one.

Be prepared however. The L/LA/D and now E-series Deere mowers utilize Tuff Torq T40 or T46 transmissions that aren't designed to be serviced. It's a sealed unit. Deere dealers will offer to replace it as a single unit for you but they won't repair them. The cost of doing that is prohibitive.

These things are known for dying and when they do, you get pretty much the exact symptoms you laid out.

There are some videos on YouTube where guys have pulled those transmissions apart and tinkered with them. I have no idea how well they work once they get done.

I saw a guy pull the rear end off and drain the fluid out through the fill hole and put new fluid in...it drove around after that but no clue how long it would last.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,774 Posts
I saw a guy pull the rear end off and drain the fluid out through the fill hole and put new fluid in...it drove around after that but no clue how long it would last.
There are internal check valves that prevent a dump out from getting most of the fluid out. You do need to split the case to change it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
529 Posts
My only JD is the 1025r, but my 20 or so year old Craftsman had the same symptoms. A new drive belt and adjusting the idler wheel so there was a little more tension on it fixed the problem. Hope it's a simple as that for you...
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
20,353 Posts
I wondered about this but I didnt hear anything that sounded like the splines were slipping. it just wouldnt go
You won’t hear it strangely enough. At least nobody has ever reported that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
927 Posts
You won’t hear it strangely enough. At least nobody has ever reported that.
If you're talking about the pulley that sits on top of the tranny, I can report that it can make a heck of a racket. My buddys former x304 did that. He was going up a slight slope, and the splines finally gave it up. He freewheeled backwards, the whole way with that very loud grinding noise. It sound like his mower blade was hitting a rock.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top