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We have some antelope in the freezer that's ground for jerky. We usually mix it with beef and make burgers, but I figured I should try actually making jerky out of it. After all, we have a dehydrator and everybody likes jerky. I ordered a jerky gun, and since this is a first attempt I bought a sampler pack of seasonings from High Mountain.

The jerky gun won't be here for a few days, but I wanted to try this out this weekend. Luckily, Albertsons had London Broil on sale. The guy in the meat department was even nice enough to slice it for me, 1/4" thick against the grain. There wasn't much fat left to be trimmed off, but I removed a little bit this afternoon and seasoned it. Went with the High Mountain original blend seasoning.



They say to let it marinate 24 hours, since some slices are a little thick I think I'll let it go 25 or 26 and put it in the dehydrator tomorrow afternoon. :munch:
 

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High Mountain makes excellent seasonings. I prefer to smoke my jerky for 3-4 hours at 235*F with 1.5oz of cherry. Curious how well it turns out in the dehydrator!!

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If I had a smoker, I would smoke it. That's a little advanced for me right now though.

I got tied up and just got in, so it marinated for 26.5 hours before going in the dehydrator, and some of it didn't fit. I think 3 lbs would've made it, but that extra .5 lbs needs another tray. It went back in the fridge, I'll try to do it tomorrow night. It may take 4-5 hours, but I'll check it the first time around 3.

 

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Flavor is good, I went a little too long and it's just a bit dry. Still good, but I should've taken it off a half hour sooner and it would've been a bit more tender.
It ain't manly jerky unless ya got to shake your jaw and pull like hell to git a piece.:lol:
 

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I too have a question. I have only a general idea how jerky is made; in fact I made some from round steak in the oven one time. My concern is with wild game especially. My question is this: How do you make sure that the processing kills any potential parasites or unwanted bacteria? I am not particularly concerned with say a flank steak that you buy in a grocery store; current farming practices and U.S.D.A. inspection gives me some assurance that it is safe to eat. However, deer and other wild game are another matter.

Here's one for the FWIW department...My Dad had some hunting buddies who just happened to be tribal members and who had access to a particular reservation where they hunted deer. They very generously gave him a rather large quantity of deer jerky that they had prepared in the traditional way. This was about 60 years ago; Let me just say the processing left a lot to be desired...I couldn't get close enough to it to even sample it.
 

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Why would you grind up meat to put it back together to make jerky? :dunno:

Unless you are trying to salvage scraps which should go into sausage anyway.


Steve

I don't know the whole reason, but I'd guess it's just another way to do it. The texture is different and it requires more seasoning for ground meat, so perhaps it's more flavorful? Personally I really don't like sausage, so I would rather use scraps for jerky.

The reason I'm doing ground this time is because that's what our friends gave me. :laugh:

I too have a question. I have only a general idea how jerky is made; in fact I made some from round steak in the oven one time. My concern is with wild game especially. My question is this: How do you make sure that the processing kills any potential parasites or unwanted bacteria? I am not particularly concerned with say a flank steak that you buy in a grocery store; current farming practices and U.S.D.A. inspection gives me some assurance that it is safe to eat. However, deer and other wild game are another matter.
It has to reach the proper temperature, approximately 145* for solid meat and 160* for ground. There's also a product called cure that you mix with the seasoning, it's a mixture of salt and nitrates that helps kill bacteria with relatively low temperatures.
 

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I used to have homemade recipe for the ground jerky that I made back in the 90's. It was pretty good and used a lot of salt. Can't remember for sure but the main ingredient was picking or canning salt. Between that and the dehydration process I'd imagine that took care of the nasties.

I saw your post yesterday about the jerky "gun". You bought a jerky "cannon".

Anyway everyone enjoyed the ground jerky. I used ground deer meet when I made it.

Not sure the ground jerky is all that healthy sodiumwise.
 

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This is on my todo list once I finally get my own place.


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I don't know the whole reason, but I'd guess it's just another way to do it. The texture is different and it requires more seasoning for ground meat, so perhaps it's more flavorful? Personally I really don't like sausage, so I would rather use scraps for jerky.

The reason I'm doing ground this time is because that's what our friends gave me. :laugh:



It has to reach the proper temperature, approximately 145* for solid meat and 160* for ground. There's also a product called cure that you mix with the seasoning, it's a mixture of salt and nitrates that helps kill bacteria with relatively low temperatures.
Found this:

http://extension.oregonstate.edu/fch/sites/default/files/documents/pnw_632_makingjerkyathome.pdf
 

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do you grind it before you put it in the dehydrator?
 

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Discussion Starter #16
do you grind it before you put it in the dehydrator?
You can. The first batch I made was whole meat sliced from a London Broil. This batch is ground antelope, and what got me started on this. A friend gave us 50 lbs of frozen antelope, including a few packages that were already ground for jerky. We usually mix that with beef for burgers (not enough fat in pure antelope) but instead I decided to try making jerky with some of it.
 
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