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This tractor has run good since I got it, but had to park it outside for several days a while back. Of course we got rain for a couple of those days and the next time I ran it I started having problems. When I checked the bowl on the carb I found some water. I hadn't added any fuel so I figure it had to get in the tank through the fuel cap or around the fuel line grommet on top of the tank. I pulled the fender deck off, cleaned off the crud, and found a bad fuel line grommet.
The mower shop down the road had one so I didn't have to wait for parts. I got everything blown out and reassembled. I had a new hydro reservoir on hand so this was a good time to install it also. Got it fired up and it seems to be running good again.
 

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Took the GT225 for about a 1/2 hour drive thru the woods and around the farm. Its still running good so I think its fixed.
 

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Add some dry gas to get rid of any residue of moisture in the tank.
 

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Add some dry gas to get rid of any residue of moisture in the tank.
I guess I didn't mention that I poured the old gas out of the tank and put new fuel in.
 

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I guess I didn't mention that I poured the old gas out of the tank and put new fuel in.
In the winter months when temps go up and down,whether you store it or use it for snow removal it's a good idea to put some in incase condensation forms from temperature change.
 

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My thoughts are that if you add alcohol to the fuel , (IE Heet) you're asking for it to draw more moisture into the fuel plus it isn't good for the fuel system components. So be careful of what you add.
 

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tseleno, Alcohol doesn't ADD water to the fuel, it encapsulates the water molecules already in the fuel on a molecular level. Alcohol also burns hotter than gas and will instantly turn the water into steam and then pass out the exhaust, often giving the engine more power due to the high expansion rate of water.

Aircraft turbines/jets actually inject a water/alcohol mix for an extra "boost" on take-off. Bob
 

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My thoughts are that if you add alcohol to the fuel , (IE Heet) you're asking for it to draw more moisture into the fuel plus it isn't good for the fuel system components. So be careful of what you add.
It doesn't draw moisture in,and I would rather add a once of Heet than have a tractor that won't run because it's froze up.
 

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Whichever one prefers as it isn't any skin off my back. Alcohol does attract water. Ask that first year chemistry student at your table. Rather than pounding our keyboards, pour some cheap pump gas into a shallow metal pan out in the driveway and walk away for 20 minutes and note the cloudiness forming into the previously clear fuel. Water droplets will eventually form. Temperature and humidity level may vary the time frame, but it inevitably happens. Add alcohol to fuel with water added into a similar pan. Note how the alcohol grabs on to the water puddle. It is a visible change. Whether or not your fuel cap is vented, every carbureted engine has a vented fuel system. I'll use alcohol mixed with fuel to help evacuate water from hard to clean fuel tanks as I swish if around and dump the mix. It helps grab the water.

OPE has had big issues over the later years with viton, tygon and other rubber like compounds in fuel systems becoming soft, swelling or deformed from the use of alcohol. Carburetor coatings and castings that are used in manufacture are also damaged by alcohol . This happens so much so that people stabilize the fuel and or buy clear gas rather than alcohol enhanced fuel. So then why add more? Should you suspect a touch of water or just want to help protect against the dreaded "ice up", put an ounce of Seafoam or something else that can help manage the water plus not contribute to the problem.
 

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Whichever one prefers as it isn't any skin off my back. Alcohol does attract water. Ask that first year chemistry student at your table. Rather than pounding our keyboards, pour some cheap pump gas into a shallow metal pan out in the driveway and walk away for 20 minutes and note the cloudiness forming into the previously clear fuel. Water droplets will eventually form. Temperature and humidity level may vary the time frame, but it inevitably happens. Add alcohol to fuel with water added into a similar pan. Note how the alcohol grabs on to the water puddle. It is a visible change. Whether or not your fuel cap is vented, every carbureted engine has a vented fuel system. I'll use alcohol mixed with fuel to help evacuate water from hard to clean fuel tanks as I swish if around and dump the mix. It helps grab the water.

OPE has had big issues over the later years with viton, tygon and other rubber like compounds in fuel systems becoming soft, swelling or deformed from the use of alcohol. Carburetor coatings and castings that are used in manufacture are also damaged by alcohol . This happens so much so that people stabilize the fuel and or buy clear gas rather than alcohol enhanced fuel. So then why add more? Should you suspect a touch of water or just want to help protect against the dreaded "ice up", put an ounce of Seafoam or something else that can help manage the water plus not contribute to the problem.
You may be just a bit confused.

Water is NOT attracted to alcohol, period, end of subject. However, unlike gasoline, alcohol will MIX/combine with water. This ability to mix/combine with water is not magic, it is due to the chemical properties, density, of alcohol. Adding alcohol to the fuel in small quantities will absolutely NOT harm the fuel system, aluminum castings, steel, or fuel lines. However, the alcohol will settle below gasoline and MIX with the water, which is also more dense than the gasoline, and the reason the water settles to the bottom of the tank (duh).

After mixing with the water the mixture is still combustible and will burn just like any other combustible fuel, but not with any real efficiency. Being that the water and alcohol are now mixed the water is carried through the carburetor as part of the mixture, and into the cylinder where the alcohol water mix supports combustion and is burned off.

The added benefit of alcohol is that it will not freeze at temperatures normally seen in the United States. Adding a small amount of rubbing alcohol to the fuel tank during the north eastern winter months has been a practice of mine for over 60 years. This is a practice taught to me by my father, and taught to him as a child, then taught again during WWII. It kept equipment running during the battle of the bulge. I use rubbing alcohol from the supermarket, 80 cents per bottle. But that's me.

You've made a big deal out of using the product HEET. Well, surprise, HEET is 99% ISOPROPYLE, or 99% ALCOHOL for those still reading along. You can check all this with your first year chemistry student if you like.

HEET;

Isopropyl alcohol

Chemical compound

Description
Isopropyl alcohol is a compound with the chemical formula C₃H₈O. It is a colorless, flammable chemical compound with a strong odor. As an isopropyl group linked to a hydroxyl group, it is the simplest example of a secondary alcohol, where the alcohol carbon atom is attached to two other carbon atoms.

Density: 786 kg/m³
Formula: C3H8O
Boiling point: 180.7°F (82.6°C)
Molar mass: 60.1 g/mol
Melting point: -128.2°F (-89°C)
IUPAC ID: isopropyl alcohol
 

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Could the facts be somewhere in the middle?

Alcohol is hygroscopic. This is a fact. Depending on the definition you find for hygroscopic, it ranges from "a substance that readily absorbs water" to "a substance that attracts water". Alcohol will readily absorb water out of the air and as pointed out, in ones gas tank.

There are different types of alcohol and they have differing impacts on plastic and rubber compounds.

Isopropyl is pretty benign.

Ethanol was thought to be benign at the 10% mark and below when mixed with gasoline but caused many fuel system components to degrade over time.

If you are using an ethanol gas blend, I don't see the need to add additional alcohol to the mix. It's already at 10% alcohol, why do you need more than that?

I haven't added Heet since the alcohol blends started and have never had an issue with frozen gas lines using blended gasoline.


More details....
Alcohol is soluble in gasoline and vise versa. Alcohol does not settle to the bottom or your tank. It will absorb the water in your tank (within limits) and disperse the water throughout the fuel mixture. If the limit of the amount of water that can be absorbed by the alcohol fuel mixture can handle is exceeded, it will separate and you will need to discard the fuel.

Perhaps we should get back to the original topic....
 

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Yes, I know what Heet is. No confusion here. No real need to be wittier than the next guy or be confrontational. What I do is service equipment for a living. Part of that is offering useful information for my customers and for those maybe on a forum which some could find helpful. In doing so, I see the damage that our lovely ethanol laden fuel does. Everything I said and more. A little light online reading can confirm any of it.

If there is a benefit to the ethanol blend fuel it is that the alcohol can suspend some water in the mix for a limited time which seems to make the presents of water less noticeable runability wise on a small scale. Eventually, the fuel cannot hold more water and as water is heavier than fuel, floats in the bottom of the tank, float bowl etc. Should you wish to understand this better, look up "phase separation" regarding fuel. Plastic fuel tanks don't seem to care. Carburetor stems do. Some carbs are worse than others which may be an indication of the metallurgy or manufacturing process of the carburetor.

With that being said, if the equipment has issues with the added alcohol- yes, why add more? I seem to remember differences between that red and yellow bottle of Heet :) Take the time and drop an old carburetor is a basin with different alcohols added to the fuel in an area with minor exposure to air and temperature swings and see what you've got in 6 months and report back. When you read articles from engineers and chemists, some will also explain this in detail and many will say once water is present that no additive will return the fuel to spec. We all do it and our engines still run.
 
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