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Saw this old article the other day. There is a lot of truth here.



A few years ago I was flying a gentleman somewhere and we go to talking about our backgrounds and how we grew up. Got to talking about this exact thing. He told
Me if he had two people apply for a job and everything between the two was equal except one grew up on a farm. He’d hire the farm kid.


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OMG! That really touched my heart. Pardon me while I clean my glasses. That brought back so much of my younger days; that's pretty much the way it was for country folks. That smell of manure ...as well as the smell of disinfectant in the study hall on a hot day more than likely came from the shoes of Earl Dean, whose family ran a dairy farm. Our FFA instructor, Mr. W.D. Sumner, was also our mentor, counselor, disciplinarian, and the only "veterinarian" we knew; such that the community chipped in and bought him a brand new 1951 Chevrolet because he wore his car out tending to the farmers in the community. I'll never forget the last class we had before graduation; he taught us how to shake hands, how to tie a tie, gave us a lecture on adultery and fornication and the evils of venereal disease, and closed with the admonition that we should all marry a country girl.

I still maintain that most of the worlds problems are big city problems; not that some country boys don't stray occasionally, but I never had one steal my hubcaps. I wouldn't trade growing up in the country for anything.
 

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Wow I can relate to that. Thanks for posting , a lot of truth there. I see it in my own girls, they learned responsibility early. Not bragging at all but we used to see it between their friends in school and their cousin’s. You can tell the difference between kids that have been exposed to farming and those who have not. My girls were involved in 4H and had to do chores from almost day one.
 

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Good article... I've heard from many hiring managers "hire the person, teach the skill"

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That is a philosophy that I have always followed. You can teach the skill, but you cannot teach them how to be a good employee. And if a farm person is applying, send the rest of them home as that farm person is the first choice.

Dave
 

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I've interviewed 4x in my life and been given 4 jobs. First two I told them I would work for free the first day, if they didn't like me, I would never come back. Next two (more formal interview process) jobs they asked "why should we hire you over someone else" my response was "because I want to come to work, do my job and go home without any drama."

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I've interviewed 4x in my life and been given 4 jobs. First two I told them I would work for free the first day, if they didn't like me, I would never come back. Next two (more formal interview process) jobs they asked "why should we hire you over someone else" my response was "because I want to come to work, do my job and go home without any drama."

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Good response. I was interviewing a young lawyer, just out of law school, and asked her why she wanted to work for the government. She said because she wanted a nine to five job where she wouldn't have to work so hard. I don't know if she ever found that job or not.
 

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Good response. I was interviewing a young lawyer, just out of law school, and asked her why she wanted to work for the government. She said because she wanted a nine to five job where she wouldn't have to work so hard. I don't know if she ever found that job or not.
We know someone who has that job in southwestern New York.:laugh:
 

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We know someone who has that job in southwestern New York.:laugh:
I think you mean HAD that job, he retired, if it's who I think you mean :mocking: :hi:
 

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I think you mean HAD that job, he retired, if it's who I think you mean :mocking: :hi:
I was referring to Colony Park, who retired when he fell into a government job.
 

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I was referring to Colony Park, who retired when he fell into a government job.
And thanks for using the word fell. It’s not my first choice, but between this and my side business, I think I have the best land surveying jobs in my area. I did pay my dues for 20 years though. Taught by hard working parents, to work hard.
 

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Good article.

I am fortunate to work in a job where the “skills” I acquired over the years were appreciated in the hiring process - after 15 years of working in the same industry and watching “kids” (aka people 10 years my junior straight out of college) come in, knowing not much more than the field they trained for was overcrowded and they needed a job ASAP - I knew there had to be a better option.

Walked into the interview, chatted briefly about my bio and education. Went really quick and figured once they knew I lacked a 4 year degree from some state university having nothing to deal with our industry - they simply found me “unqualified” and moved on.

When I got the callback a few days later with a nice offer, I was suprised. Talking with the interviewer a few months later, they were very candid as to why I was hired. We work in a service industry - where equal parts manners and common sense knowledge is key. While our competition focuses on “trainable” employees - people who have recent college and have shown there adapt at sitting in a classroom regurgitating all the info they just picked up from their latest course - they want people who can work unsupervised and who can do it on their own without waiting a year for a traininee. Farmers in general work in similar fashion...they are notoriously self reliant. There is no “calling the guy” to come fix things when they break - you learn to fix it, and when it goes wrong again you know how to fix it.

Knowing the face of their company knows how to fix the problem, and can explain it to the customer in common sense terms and in a non offputting way was important. Some things can’t be taught in a classroom, and have to be shown in a field.

It’s sad that vo-ag training locally has been largely lost. Still a few die- hards training future full time want to be’s, but no real interest in teaching “life skills”. No reason a 18 year old should not know how to change the oil in a car, replace the plugs or know how to change a tire. Likewise, these future renters and homeowners probably should be taught basic plumbing repair, how to change a socket and what to do when a breaker trips. I learned all this by 10th grade. By 12th, I had basic welding knowledge - the ability to rebuild a small engine and basic carpentry as well as experience in raising livestock and butchering it. All this while not being a particularly eager student. Turns out those skills served me well in my 20s/30s...knowing enough not to have to call someone for every common issue saved me $$...$$ that could be saved or spent on more enjoyable things. Having a few talking points on skills made me a more marketable job candidate - I didn’t walk in an expert, but knowing the basics cuts your learning curve that much more when working with them.
 
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