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Just placed an order at my local John Deere dealer. I ordered a 1025r, R4 tires, H120 loader, 60" MMM, a JD647 tiller and an iMatch Quick connector. It is scheduled for delivery this coming Saturday.

I am a first time tractor owner and was wanting to ask is there any particulars I need to know in terms of operation, maintenance, etc.

The tractor will be used for mowing 2.5 acres and doing work in a 2 acre wooded area and gardening and other misc task around the house.

Any advice on using the 647 tiller?

Thanks for any info y'all can give!
 

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Congrats and:
:wgtt:
 

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Congrats :greentractorride:
 

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Welcome from West Virginia

:wgtt:
 

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Welcome and congrats on the purchase. They are awesome tractors and mine continues to impress me every time I use it!
 

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Welcome sir, you are really going to enjoy your landscape chores with that tractor. I will apologize for not knowing how to link a thread for you, but you will absolutely have to have a method of attaching a great deal of weight to the rear of the tractor, referred to as ballast. I will advise you to search this site for ballast and why you need it, and then select the type of weight set up you think will be best for you. Ballast is essential for balancing the tractor when you use the loader to pick and carry weight in the bucket. Failure to ballast can lead to premature front axle failure due to overloading and also loss of brakes and tipping the tractor over on relatively mild slopes and bumps. Sorry so serious but it is THAT important.
 

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Welcome sir, you are really going to enjoy your landscape chores with that tractor. I will apologize for not knowing how to link a thread for you, but you will absolutely have to have a method of attaching a great deal of weight to the rear of the tractor, referred to as ballast. I will advise you to search this site for ballast and why you need it, and then select the type of weight set up you think will be best for you. Ballast is essential for balancing the tractor when you use the loader to pick and carry weight in the bucket. Failure to ballast can lead to premature front axle failure due to overloading and also loss of brakes and tipping the tractor over on relatively mild slopes and bumps. Sorry so serious but it is THAT important.
^^^^THIS^^^^

:wgtt:

Congrats...you will love it!

Just because you CAN lift something without ballast doesn't mean you should. There are numerous options for ballast and a few minutes of research on the subject here will be extremely enlightening. There are factory options as well as a many aftermarket options, Some of our supporting vendors offer options as well. I chose to go with a Heavy Hitch from heavyhitch.com/ and some factory weights. I use this anytime I have the loader on without the BH. While this works for my situation it may not be best for you so shop around. Stay safe and have fun!!
 

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Just placed an order at my local John Deere dealer. I ordered a 1025r, R4 tires, H120 loader, 60" MMM, a JD647 tiller and an iMatch Quick connector. It is scheduled for delivery this coming Saturday.

I am a first time tractor owner and was wanting to ask is there any particulars I need to know in terms of operation, maintenance, etc.

The tractor will be used for mowing 2.5 acres and doing work in a 2 acre wooded area and gardening and other misc task around the house.

Any advice on using the 647 tiller?

Thanks for any info y'all can give!
Welcome. One thing I would mention to a new tractor operator is to always start/stop the PTO only at idle. Do not engage/disengage the PTO at full throttle.

Many other things, but you will learn as you go. Don't be a stranger here. Ask questions, read the historical discussions. LOTS of wisdom on the pages of GTT.
 

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^^^^THIS^^^^

:wgtt:

Congrats...you will love it!

Just because you CAN lift something without ballast doesn't mean you should. There are numerous options for ballast and a few minutes of research on the subject here will be extremely enlightening. There are factory options as well as a many aftermarket options, Some of our supporting vendors offer options as well. I chose to go with a Heavy Hitch from heavyhitch.com/ and some factory weights. I use this anytime I have the loader on without the BH. While this works for my situation it may not be best for you so shop around. Stay safe and have fun!!

Yea, I have had others mention this to me as well. My salesman said to get a box blade and it would be plenty heavy enough and it would serve more purpose other than just weight. The box blade is around 350lbs, so I dont think that would be quite heavy enough. Im going to go pick up a ballast box soon.

Thanks for the info and thanks for the warm welcome everyone!
 

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My carry-all from TSC serves as my ballast most times. I've covered it with plywood to allow carrying the Wife around and loading equipment, junk, etc. I put concrete block at the back when I need it. It will pop a wheelie when I take the loader off, so that's about the right loading I would guess. It's my most versatile attachment.

You will love the Tractor. It will transform your property and your life. Enjoy.
 

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Welcome to GTT CodeHacker82 and congratulations on your new tractor.
 

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I was told by my salesman that you need to count yourself as ballast as well. Not certain how true this is but it makes a bit of sense when you consider the 40% front/60% rear recommendations many make over the rear. Truthfully, this is the one area that I would pay a lot of attention to since it could adversely affect your tractors performance and function.

What I'm uncertain about is how downward force of the rear pto on, say a landscape rake, affects front/rear ballast requirements if anyone can address that.
-Lou
 

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I was told by my salesman that you need to count yourself as ballast as well. Not certain how true this is but it makes a bit of sense when you consider the 40% front/60% rear recommendations many make over the rear. Truthfully, this is the one area that I would pay a lot of attention to since it could adversely affect your tractors performance and function.

What I'm uncertain about is how downward force of the rear pto on, say a landscape rake, affects front/rear ballast requirements if anyone can address that.
-Lou
Your body won't do much for loader ballast unless you intend to stand on the three point hitch. Even then I doubt you'll be enough weight.

Your three point hitch does not have any down pressure.
 

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Ask your salesperson and to show you that in the loader manual :dunno:
 

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I was told by my salesman that you need to count yourself as ballast as well. Not certain how true this is but it makes a bit of sense when you consider the 40% front/60% rear recommendations many make over the rear. Truthfully, this is the one area that I would pay a lot of attention to since it could adversely affect your tractors performance and function.

What I'm uncertain about is how downward force of the rear pto on, say a landscape rake, affects front/rear ballast requirements if anyone can address that.
-Lou
The farther the weight is from the front axle the more it will counteract whatever is on the other side.
I currently leave my backhoe attached for most of my loader work.
My tiller on the other hand is a beast. I once unhooked the FEL to attach the tiller and it easily pulled the front wheels off the ground so now for tilling operations, I will leave the FEL on.

Landscape rake hangs out the back of the 3PH quite a bit and will help as ballast right up until you drop it down to use it. Then it will have zero effect.

That's my story and I am sticking to it.
 

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Your body won't do much for loader ballast unless you intend to stand on the three point hitch. Even then I doubt you'll be enough weight.

Your three point hitch does not have any down pressure.
Thanks Blake. This is going to be my first legit tractor and 3 pt hitch; trying to do this thing correctly and trying to get the real deal out of all the sales-speak helps the decision on where I end up buying.
-Lou
 

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Welcome and congrats. As for ballast, you will want to buy some suitcase weights to be used on the front and rear. There are times you don't want the BH or the FEL on when doing other work such as tilling. I find it better to do my tilling without the FEL on. I use suitcase weights on the front when tilling. And there are times I don't want or need anything on the back when using the FEL and just add weights to the rear. Find what works for you and enjoy what you have and be safe.
 

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I forgot to add that the driveshaft may need to be shortened for your rotary tiller. The fact you got the Imatch (good move) will mean that you MAY not have to shorten it, or you may shorten it less than if you were just hooking to the three point. Once you adjust the shaft length for Imatch hook up, don't try to use the tiller without the Imatch on your tiller unless you plan to shorten it more. Your tiller should come with instructions for shaft adjustment. Also verify the lube quantities of the tiller, and everything else on the tractor. If your tiller has a slip clutch then read about adjusting and deliberately slipping the clutch periodically to keep a constant clean clutch surface for repeatable slip function. If the clutch never slips and rust develops on the clutch disc then it greatly increases the torque required for the clutch to work correctly and could result in tiller or tractor damage.
 
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