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Y'all know I'm going through a mild "crustoration" on my model 60 over in the restore forum. :greentractorride:

My question to you guys is this. Do I go ahead and pull the motor apart and go through it or leave it be and just get it running? My Grandpa was ready to go out and start it when I got it, but it's a ways away from that, even then. I am going to rebuild the water pump, carb, distributor, and possibly the oil pump and governor. I'll be pulling the top cover off and thoroughly cleaning it as well. It would be much more work other than gaskets and rings to pull the head off. The only real issue becomes of that is, what pistons do I install? Do I bore it? I'd like this to be a useable tractor, look fairly stock, but be very reliable, and lastly I'd like to maybe pull with it at the local tractor shows and such.

Thoughts?
 

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If I pulled the cylinders, I'd think about having them chromed, if they are out of specs. Then they would be good for our lifetimes! (And yes, I't probably plan on pulling the cylinders! Easier to do it while you are restoring, than having to do it later. JMO)
 

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If I pulled the cylinders, I'd think about having them chromed, if they are out of specs. Then they would be good for our lifetimes! (And yes, I't probably plan on pulling the cylinders! Easier to do it while you are restoring, than having to do it later. JMO)
Ha Ha. You've been working on radials too long. I don't think the cylinders come off. :laugh:
 

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Just my .02 worth. How can you say it is restored if the engine is still original??? But more important, how happy would you be if you were in a parade or some other public venue and the engine decided to crap out on you. It would seem a shame to do all the restoration work that you are already doing and not finish the job with possibly the most important part. Reliability will always be in question until you rebuild the engine. A stock rebuild would seem to be just fine unless you really want to turn up the power for the tractor pulls. :greentractorride:

Dave
 

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Ha Ha. You've been working on radials too long. I don't think the cylinders come off. :laugh:
The cylinder block does come out as one piece. The crankcase is the the same casting as the trans. This is where the s/n resides.

Just my .02 worth. How can you say it is restored if the engine is still original??? But more important, how happy would you be if you were in a parade or some other public venue and the engine decided to crap out on you. It would seem a shame to do all the restoration work that you are already doing and not finish the job with possibly the most important part. Reliability will always be in question until you rebuild the engine. A stock rebuild would seem to be just fine unless you really want to turn up the power for the tractor pulls. :greentractorride:

Dave
I'm not doing a restoration.... I'm still not positive I'm even going to paint it! :lol: My goal is to have a good mechanically operating tractor that no one is afraid to get on and use. My Grandpa wouldn't have cared if it looked good. As long as it ran good, he was all set. I'm going to give the project my own twist of course, but the overall goal is not a factory restoration that you commonly see at tractor shows. :good2:

I will at a minimum go through the items I listed earlier, as well as a thorough inspection to insure reliability. I'm just not sure if I'm going to completely rebuild it and put more ponies in it. At least right now.....:laugh:
 

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You have done such a great job on Grandpa thus far, would have to go through the engine as well if it where me, especially if you are thinking of pulling with it. Hopefully you won't have any major setbacks once you get it apart. It's only time and money which we all have plenty of right?
 
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Well I the type of guy that buys something and has to take it apart as soon as I get home to see how it works. So if it were me I would probably take the engine apart if for nothing else to see how it works.
 

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I think I'd get it running and see how I like the sound. If it's not "right" then I go further into it. Like you said, you're not necessarily looking for it to be show quality.

And, btw, you're doing a great job.:thumbup1gif:
 

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Ha Ha. You've been working on radials too long. I don't think the cylinders come off. :laugh:
You say that like it is a bad thing. :laugh: Hey, at least I could attempt to understand those engines. All of the new fangled stuff, with computer chips no less, well, I'll never understand those things! :fire:
 

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You say that like it is a bad thing. :laugh: Hey, at least I could attempt to understand those engines. All of the new fangled stuff, with computer chips no less, well, I'll never understand those things! :fire:
:lol:

I tell ya, these two cylinder tractor engines make a radial aircraft engine look like what's under the hood of a modern truck. It's so ridiculously simple. It really is like overgrown lawnmower engine.


Thanks for all the compliments guys! :hi:
 

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diesel, I agree with 56Fordguy. How many hours on the tractor? How does it sound when it is running without a rebuild?
Note: Just because you rebuild the engine does not necessary mean it will be more reliable and won't break down. The WHOLE tractor is as old as the few parts you would replace. Sometimes new parts don't always play well with old parts. Also, down on a little power does not constitute a rebuild IMO.
 

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If the tractor has a working hour meter and the tachometer cable isn't broken, then maybe the hours shown are worth considering. If you pull the head, look for how much of a ridge there is at the top of the cylinders. If the engine was never rebuilt, (don't recall if you said your grandpa was the first owner)and the original pistons are still in it, then that would also have some weight on whether to pull the cylinder case and pistons. The valves and seats just may only need minor work and not replacement. But, that's all up to you. Pulling the head now, may save you some time and frustration and money later. Never know about what shape the head gasket is in. Would be good to see what shape the piston pins and bushings are in and also the rings and pistons. I purposely didnt mention the rod bearings and crank.$$$$ On some aftermarket pistons, they had areas on the piston skirts to allow oil to better lubricate and lessen piston drag and scoring. The original pistons I have noticed, differ in that design.

For me, considering the time and money spent on restorations or refurbs,it isn't worth risking damage by entering them in pulls. I might go to a plow day and participate, but just light work. That's just me.
 

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If the tractor has a working hour meter and the tachometer cable isn't broken, then maybe the hours shown are worth considering. If you pull the head, look for how much of a ridge there is at the top of the cylinders. If the engine was never rebuilt, (don't recall if you said your grandpa was the first owner)and the original pistons are still in it, then that would also have some weight on whether to pull the cylinder case and pistons. The valves and seats just may only need minor work and not replacement. But, that's all up to you. Pulling the head now, may save you some time and frustration and money later. Never know about what shape the head gasket is in. Would be good to see what shape the piston pins and bushings are in and also the rings and pistons. I purposely didnt mention the rod bearings and crank.$$$$ On some aftermarket pistons, they had areas on the piston skirts to allow oil to better lubricate and lessen piston drag and scoring. The original pistons I have noticed, differ in that design.

For me, considering the time and money spent on restorations or refurbs,it isn't worth risking damage by entering them in pulls. I might go to a plow day and participate, but just light work. That's just me.
Edit: Sorry, dealing with a lot today and having trouble trying to function on 2 hours sleep.
You may not be able to see how much of a ridge there might be in the cylinders without pulling the cylinder case and sliding the pistons back or out.
 

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If you want to do well at the pulls , your going to want/need the engine in tip top shape. For parades and light work I wouldn't spend any more than absolutely necessary.
 

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There is an outfit in Houston ,where I used to send my dirtbike cylinders too. It was called NikaSeal (Nickel Silicon Carbide) Plating....if I remember correctly. Seems lke the outfits name was Powerseal....or something. Once a cylinder is done...it'll be most reliable piece in the engine and will last through umpteen re-ring/piston changes. Also gets a really good seal. It was about a hundred dollars 6-7 yrs ago per cylinder...might get cheaper per cylinder ...if more than one....I dunno
 

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:lol:

I tell ya, these two cylinder tractor engines make a radial aircraft engine look like what's under the hood of a modern truck. It's so ridiculously simple. It really is like overgrown lawnmower engine.
And that is why I would just run it for now. It isn't like a timing belt is going to break or a rod is going to get thrown. Plus, how much work is it to pull the cylinder casting if you had to do it in the future? I think you can even leave the front frame attached and do it if I'm not mistaken.
 
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