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I only have a loader with Heavy Hitch teeth, and a tiller. Ground is mostly clay with rock. Soft now, but will get very hard come summer. I've never put a gravel driveway in.

Hoping that someone way more experienced than me can give me a few tips.
If conditions are as you describe, consider renting a bigger/different machine or hire it out. Tillers don't like rocks.
 

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If conditions are as you describe, consider renting a bigger/different machine or hire it out. Tillers don't like rocks.
This is sage advise. You can’t just spread some gravel out and expect it to stay. First thing needed is excavation to provide proper drainage. Just like building a house - the foundation is the most important part. This alone it out of the scope of a 2-series tractor. Think buldozer and/or track hoe.

After that it will take usually 3 different size stones/gravel. Starting out with large stuff - around here we use shale. After that is spread it needs compacted. Next a layer or medium stone like #4’s and again compacted. Then finally a 2” layer of #2 stone and compated.

There will be many variations to this depending on your location and soil type. Location “Zone 6B” means nothing to me. If you are in a swampy area it will take hundreds of tons of big stuff before it will stay put.
 

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This is sage advise. You can’t just spread some gravel out and expect it to stay. First thing needed is excavation to provide proper drainage. Just like building a house - the foundation is the most important part. This alone it out of the scope of a 2-series tractor. Think buldozer and/or track hoe.

After that it will take usually 3 different size stones/gravel. Starting out with large stuff - around here we use shale. After that is spread it needs compacted. Next a layer or medium stone like #4’s and again compacted. Then finally a 2” layer of #2 stone and compated.

There will be many variations to this depending on your location and soil type. Location “Zone 6B” means nothing to me. If you are in a swampy area it will take hundreds of tons of big stuff before it will stay put.
Along with this excellent advice, I'll add one more thing that's not mentioned much. Geotextile driveway fabric.
 

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Along with this excellent advice, I'll add one more thing that's not mentioned much. Geotextile driveway fabric.
I’ve never had that available to me so am unfamiliar. At what point is it installed and what is the benefit?

Not doubting you at all - always eager to learn!
 

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Along with this excellent advice, I'll add one more thing that's not mentioned much. Geotextile driveway fabric.
Can you provide more details? I've heard that while this stuff is okay for the initial application it can make future driveway maintenance a bit of a pain.
 

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Can you provide more details? I've heard that while this stuff is okay for the initial application it can make future driveway maintenance a bit of a pain.
While it may cause issues, the benifit is that muck does not infultrate the stone layers. I believe that, this mixing of muck and stone in addition to freeze thaw cycles, create the pot holes. If the drive is dug deep enough (2ft), the drive will last much longer using the geotextile.

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I agree with other posts here, if you soil is just clay with rocks in it. Clay is too soft when wet to be a good road base. It will move when you drive across it, causing ruts, and gravel you put on it will just push down into it and disappear.

The geotextile fabric goes between the clay and your base gravel/material. The elevation you use the fabric at has a lot of variables though. How much clay is in the soil, how wet is the area, how heavy/much traffic will the road have. On some roads I’ve had to excavate 6 feet of clay, then lay the fabric, then bring in pit run gravel and compact that back to road height. In other cases you can get away with only having 8-12” of gravel on the fabric.

If clay content is low enough and traffic will be light enough you might even get away with just putting large gravel on the compacted native soil, then putting your finish gravel on top of that.

I’ve also heard lime can be mixed with clay soils to stabilize them, but don’t know anything about it because lime is not available in my area.

With those things in mind... I would do these things in my area.

Remove vegetation and topsoil from your driveway and ditch area next to your driveway.

Remove even more material from ditch areas, and make ditches so that they drain the water somewhere away from your road. You don’t want water sitting next to your road. Remove enough material that you can later put topsoil back in it, grow grass and still have a ditch.

Install culverts under your road if needed, make sure they are big enough to handle whatever water you have in your area. You may want to make sure they are big enough to clean out somehow so they don’t get plugged.
If you have to install culverts, you should compact the soil around them and don’t use gravel with no fines in it to fill in around them. You need to force the water to use the culvert, or it will wash out around it.

Fill in any low areas with either native soil excavated from ditches, or gravel brought in. I would compact these areas as they were filled, compaction methods would vary on soil type and the amount of fill.

Grade and compact driveway sub grade.

Install geotextile fabric if needed.

Install and compact road base material. ~12” of larger gravel, but with enough fine material that it can be compacted.

Install, grade and compact surface gravel. ~3-4” of 3/4” crushed gravel is what I like. Grade the surface so that water will run off both sides to your ditches. You don’t want water sitting on, or running lengthways down your road.

Might be something useful in there for you.

And here’s a picture of my favorite driveway I built, it was about 3 miles long, and steep, all the way. This place gets about 300” of snow a year. Wish I had a better camera back then.
 

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I am thinking that your road is only 300' long and that isn't much. I am also thinking you will need to buy a box blade to maintain the road no matter who builds it. You could excavate with a box blade - I know this will take awhile and many passes with your tractor, but again 300' long and probably 10' wide isn't much. You can also use the box blade to grade the sides of the road for drainage. I do not know where you live, but all clay is not the same. In Georgia we have nothing but clay but build roads on it all the time. Like others have said though use about 3 layers of rock...start with relatively larger stone on the bottom and use a good layer of crush and run on top. If you water the crush and run down as you pack it over time it becomes very stable and will not move - it becomes just about like concrete. If you don't mind it taking some time and making some mistakes along the way and maybe not being as perfect as a professional installation this would be fine otherwise like the others have said hire someone with bobcat to knock it out.
 

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I just had a 300' driveway (and a turnaround) put in my pond property. I hired a company who had the dump trucks and dozer. I wanted a 10' driveway, but the dozer they brought had a 12 1/2' blade! That was the best thing that happened that day, as the wider driveway is a big bonus since it's on a curve. My main problem is that the ground was soft last fall when they put the drive in, and they had mud push up in the center of the drive at two spots as they were backing in the later trucks. I'll dig those areas out this spring, as they won't get any better by themselves.
210 ton of gravel, dozer and tracked bobcat for $3000.00
Jack
 

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I just had a 300' driveway (and a turnaround) put in my pond property. I hired a company who had the dump trucks and dozer. I wanted a 10' driveway, but the dozer they brought had a 12 1/2' blade! That was the best thing that happened that day, as the wider driveway is a big bonus since it's on a curve. My main problem is that the ground was soft last fall when they put the drive in, and they had mud push up in the center of the drive at two spots as they were backing in the later trucks. I'll dig those areas out this spring, as they won't get any better by themselves.
210 ton of gravel, dozer and tracked bobcat for $3000.00
Jack
Wider is always better.
 

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I agree with other posts here, if you soil is just clay with rocks in it. Clay is too soft when wet to be a good road base. It will move when you drive across it, causing ruts, and gravel you put on it will just push down into it and disappear.

The geotextile fabric goes between the clay and your base gravel/material. The elevation you use the fabric at has a lot of variables though. How much clay is in the soil, how wet is the area, how heavy/much traffic will the road have. On some roads I’ve had to excavate 6 feet of clay, then lay the fabric, then bring in pit run gravel and compact that back to road height. In other cases you can get away with only having 8-12” of gravel on the fabric.

If clay content is low enough and traffic will be light enough you might even get away with just putting large gravel on the compacted native soil, then putting your finish gravel on top of that.

I’ve also heard lime can be mixed with clay soils to stabilize them, but don’t know anything about it because lime is not available in my area.

With those things in mind... I would do these things in my area.

Remove vegetation and topsoil from your driveway and ditch area next to your driveway.

Remove even more material from ditch areas, and make ditches so that they drain the water somewhere away from your road. You don’t want water sitting next to your road. Remove enough material that you can later put topsoil back in it, grow grass and still have a ditch.

Install culverts under your road if needed, make sure they are big enough to handle whatever water you have in your area. You may want to make sure they are big enough to clean out somehow so they don’t get plugged.
If you have to install culverts, you should compact the soil around them and don’t use gravel with no fines in it to fill in around them. You need to force the water to use the culvert, or it will wash out around it.

Fill in any low areas with either native soil excavated from ditches, or gravel brought in. I would compact these areas as they were filled, compaction methods would vary on soil type and the amount of fill.

Grade and compact driveway sub grade.

Install geotextile fabric if needed.

Install and compact road base material. ~12” of larger gravel, but with enough fine material that it can be compacted.

Install, grade and compact surface gravel. ~3-4” of 3/4” crushed gravel is what I like. Grade the surface so that water will run off both sides to your ditches. You don’t want water sitting on, or running lengthways down your road.

Might be something useful in there for you.

And here’s a picture of my favorite driveway I built, it was about 3 miles long, and steep, all the way. This place gets about 300” of snow a year. Wish I had a better camera back then.
THAT is a driveway!
 
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