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Finished building a kiln in the shop for 'enhanced drying' of the red oak lumber we milled back in August.

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I pray this works, no breakdown of equipment. This morning the inside kiln temp was 86º while the shop and outside temp were considerably lower.

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I'm not sure how long it will take to dry sufficiently, hoping it's 3 - 4 months. That beats the 6 months per half inch I found with research on the web (inch and a half lumber would take a year and a half).
 

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Finished building a kiln in the shop for 'enhanced drying' of the red oak lumber we milled back in August.
I pray this works, no breakdown of equipment. This morning the inside kiln temp was 86º while the shop and outside temp were considerably lower.
I'm not sure how long it will take to dry sufficiently, hoping it's 3 - 4 months. That beats the 6 months per half inch I found with research on the web (inch and a half lumber would take a year and a half).
3 - 4 months would make it just in time for spring time. :bigthumb:
 

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3 - 4 months would make it just in time for spring time. :bigthumb:
Indeed . . . I'm looking forward to starting a build in the spring. I'm thinking a farmhouse table . . . something like this.

DIY-Farmhouse-Table-After.jpg
 

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Good luck! I hope it works for you. My experience didn't turn out so well. I ruined a new pretty good dehumidifier in a little more than 2 years. I was maintaining about 150 bf of dried wood and drying another 150 bf at a time. Home dehumidifiers aren't made to run in an acidic environment. My unit will still run but it doesn't dehumidify anymore. For the amount of wood I did it would have been about the same cost to have it done professionally.
Ron
 

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Good luck! I hope it works for you. My experience didn't turn out so well. I ruined a new pretty good dehumidifier in a little more than 2 years. I was maintaining about 150 bf of dried wood and drying another 150 bf at a time. Home dehumidifiers aren't made to run in an acidic environment. My unit will still run but it doesn't dehumidify anymore. For the amount of wood I did it would have been about the same cost to have it done professionally.
Ron


RonPol ~ Sounds like your compressor went out. Having never done this before I have a 'wait and see attitude'.
 

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Better check it frequently

Finished building a kiln in the shop for 'enhanced drying' of the red oak lumber we milled back in August.

View attachment 650600


I pray this works, no breakdown of equipment. This morning the inside kiln temp was 86º while the shop and outside temp were considerably lower.

View attachment 650602

View attachment 650604

View attachment 650606

View attachment 650608

View attachment 650610

View attachment 650612

I'm not sure how long it will take to dry sufficiently, hoping it's 3 - 4 months. That beats the 6 months per half inch I found with research on the web (inch and a half lumber would take a year and a half).
I think it may be much quicker than you think depending on lumber thickness and the kiln capacity. The combination of some heat and dehumidification can draw moisture out pretty quickly, in fact it could be too quickly and you would get a lot of checking.

There are a bunch of drying tables on the internet showing maximum safe moisture withdrawal. Also some operating instructions for similar kilns. The US Forest Service had a demo kiln at the Richmond Sawmill and Logging show this spring and the staff said they had to learn how to use it. They used sample boards and weighed them to determine moisture loss but of course you can use a meter. Weighing is the most precise but you lose a little bit of board each time you check the moisture. Pin meters are pretty good but poke holes in the wood and you need an average of multiple readings to get a true number. Surface meters are less precise but no holes and are somewhat quicker.

I think you will be very successful with your kiln but there may be a learning curve. One issue the US FS demo kiln had was making sure they got a good seal on the doors. A very small air leak can have a large impact. Since they instrumented the heck out of their kiln for test purposes, you could see a big jump in interior humidity when a door slightly warped and a very small air leak developed.

You may have already seen this: https://cf-store.widencdn.net/widnr/2/b/8/2b83be36-b1af-47da-9a32-fa1e9a1802a4.pdf?response-content-disposition=inline%3B%20filename%3D%22Dehumidification-Kiln-Plans.pdf%22&Expires=1538236795&Signature=XUzMztWR6vF5PB7v5wW5EPU-yTqdj5chJQQiDfPc9ztI3ZtopTiZGHCjwjS0Pp2xDSc5r~JTQoscWYtN08lu~Cw0mTjIm8vTDvV0CodhyRao6kbCDm1ZztoxXXEOVhSG5E3sgWJcCOt1MJ9illjsmFyjy2KTuunGz088v~a0MN5p0L5YvA3ya74~J4EBzNViJkgxaH48E7p607YJ00LCDP5DQw9h77P6UJKditD2D3-GBjchxyStMBpyUlCY2zWvZw8wQYb6F3WXYBKEkV115T743Qrr48W-HLW-fqEwCNAftfIa~bPWmltDNywDIBH5rgLBKZrSyrYBmL1ngFeD~A__&Key-Pair-Id=APKAJD5XONOBVWWOA65A

Treefarmer
 

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Finished building a kiln in the shop for 'enhanced drying' of the red oak lumber we milled back in August.

View attachment 650600


I pray this works, no breakdown of equipment. This morning the inside kiln temp was 86º while the shop and outside temp were considerably lower.

View attachment 650602

View attachment 650604

View attachment 650606

View attachment 650608

View attachment 650610

View attachment 650612

I'm not sure how long it will take to dry sufficiently, hoping it's 3 - 4 months. That beats the 6 months per half inch I found with research on the web (inch and a half lumber would take a year and a half).
I used to do wood working if you paint the ends of the boards they won't dry out as fast and not split to much, ends always dry quicker than the rest of the boards. That's why the lumber you buy has painted ends.
 

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I used to do wood working if you paint the ends of the boards they won't dry out as fast and not split to much, ends always dry quicker than the rest of the boards. That's why the lumber you buy has painted ends.

Hmm . . . I knew that and forgot about it. Looks like I have some painting to do this weekend.


Thanks . . .
 

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Paint the logs

Hmm . . . I knew that and forgot about it. Looks like I have some painting to do this weekend.


Thanks . . .
It actually works better to paint the logs before milling. Paint works but there are a bunch of wax based products made just for log end sealing. Anchorseal is one product, Bailey's End Sealer another but thick latex paint works as well if you can get the grain sealed.

Treefarmer
 

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I think it may be much quicker than you think depending on lumber thickness and the kiln capacity. The combination of some heat and dehumidification can draw moisture out pretty quickly, in fact it could be too quickly and you would get a lot of checking.

There are a bunch of drying tables on the internet showing maximum safe moisture withdrawal. Also some operating instructions for similar kilns
. The US Forest Service had a demo kiln at the Richmond Sawmill and Logging show this spring and the staff said they had to learn how to use it. They used sample boards and weighed them to determine moisture loss but of course you can use a meter. Weighing is the most precise but you lose a little bit of board each time you check the moisture. Pin meters are pretty good but poke holes in the wood and you need an average of multiple readings to get a true number. Surface meters are less precise but no holes and are somewhat quicker.

I think you will be very successful with your kiln but there may be a learning curve. One issue the US FS demo kiln had was making sure they got a good seal on the doors. A very small air leak can have a large impact. Since they instrumented the heck out of their kiln for test purposes, you could see a big jump in interior humidity when a door slightly warped and a very small air leak developed.

You may have already seen this: https://cf-store.widencdn.net/widnr/2/b/8/2b83be36-b1af-47da-9a32-fa1e9a1802a4.pdf?response-content-disposition=inline%3B%20filename%3D%22Dehumidification-Kiln-Plans.pdf%22&Expires=1538236795&Signature=XUzMztWR6vF5PB7v5wW5EPU-yTqdj5chJQQiDfPc9ztI3ZtopTiZGHCjwjS0Pp2xDSc5r~JTQoscWYtN08lu~Cw0mTjIm8vTDvV0CodhyRao6kbCDm1ZztoxXXEOVhSG5E3sgWJcCOt1MJ9illjsmFyjy2KTuunGz088v~a0MN5p0L5YvA3ya74~J4EBzNViJkgxaH48E7p607YJ00LCDP5DQw9h77P6UJKditD2D3-GBjchxyStMBpyUlCY2zWvZw8wQYb6F3WXYBKEkV115T743Qrr48W-HLW-fqEwCNAftfIa~bPWmltDNywDIBH5rgLBKZrSyrYBmL1ngFeD~A__&Key-Pair-Id=APKAJD5XONOBVWWOA65A

Treefarmer
Treefarmer ~ Thanks for lots of excellent info. My kiln is not air tight, I guess it should be and will need to work on that. I also should have sealed the ends and will do that soon also, maybe it's not too late to be of some value. In reading the a Forest Service publication, specifically addressing red oak, they state "110º max" temperature during drying, my kiln is cycling between 90 and 95º which I'm kinda thinking is okay. Outdoor winter humidity here in Oregon during the fall and winter months is typically 100%, 24/7. My shop runs in the low 40's.

I need to borrow a meter for the high school wood shop teacher in the near future.

And BTW, you link did not work for me.

Stay in touch, I am learning as you've stated.
 

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Sorry about the link

Treefarmer ~ Thanks for lots of excellent info. My kiln is not air tight, I guess it should be and will need to work on that. I also should have sealed the ends and will do that soon also, maybe it's not too late to be of some value. In reading the a Forest Service publication, specifically addressing red oak, they state "110º max" temperature during drying, my kiln is cycling between 90 and 95º which I'm kinda thinking is okay. Outdoor winter humidity here in Oregon during the fall and winter months is typically 100%, 24/7. My shop runs in the low 40's.

I need to borrow a meter for the high school wood shop teacher in the near future.

And BTW, you link did not work for me.

Stay in touch, I am learning as you've stated.
Sorry the original link didn't work. Looking back I think it was shortened when I pasted it in. Here's another shorter link to a publication by Oregon State in Corvallis-
http://owic.oregonstate.edu/sites/default/files/pubs/dhkilns.pdf

Oregon State has a very highly respected forestry department and I believe you aren't too far from Corvallis. Oregon State, Wisconsin, Virginia Tech, Auburn are some of the top forestry schools. I'm not excluding others just those jump to mind. Our daughter went to grad school at Oregon State, she learned a lot about the rainy season. When we visited, either we are extremely lucky or just hit the right time of the year because the weather was beautiful- I think it was early July but don't remember for sure now.

Treefarmer
 

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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
Sorry the original link didn't work. Looking back I think it was shortened when I pasted it in. Here's another shorter link to a publication by Oregon State in Corvallis-
http://owic.oregonstate.edu/sites/default/files/pubs/dhkilns.pdf

Oregon State has a very highly respected forestry department and I believe you aren't too far from Corvallis. Oregon State, Wisconsin, Virginia Tech, Auburn are some of the top forestry schools. I'm not excluding others just those jump to mind. Our daughter went to grad school at Oregon State, she learned a lot about the rainy season. When we visited, either we are extremely lucky or just hit the right time of the year because the weather was beautiful- I think it was early July but don't remember for sure now.

Treefarmer
Yea, we have some trees here and we do get some rain. Winter before this last one was the wettest I'd seen in my 40 years living here . . . we had about 62" here, considerably more than our typical 40 or so inches.

Years past it would stop raining after the 4th and we'd have mild summers. The last several summers have been on the hotter side, more 90º+ days than normal.

Thanks for the new read, I scanned it and will give it some attention later today.

I did get the kiln sealed better early Sunday morning when I couldn't sleep. Next is to paint the ends.
 
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