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Front wheel bushings gone bad (enough on the right rim it has peeled the steel where the bushings seat and needing a new rim) but i see the factory bushings (part #M123811) and i have seen videos on the l130 where regular bearings can be used as well. Will these work for the 120 rim also? (AM127304) Or another bearing?
 

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Yes they will work. When you get the wheels off take a good look at the axle. Usually they wear along with the bushings. You may need to replace the steering spindles.

Sent from my LGL52VL using Tapatalk
 

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^^^^^^^^ What he said ^^^^^^^ :cheers:
 

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I did this for my LA135, and the difference in the steering and how the tractor handles is night and day. The spindles/axles were fine (tractor is 7 years/400 hours old).
 

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I did this for my LA135, and the difference in the steering and how the tractor handles is night and day. The spindles/axles were fine (tractor is 7 years/400 hours old).
So you basically remove the stock bushings from the front wheels. Then use the front wheel bearings from an X300 to replace them. No other spacers or different hardware is needed? Just put the stock washer and E clip back on the spindles?

Wish I would have known about this modification when I had my L108. Even greasing them more than religiously they still wore out. By the time I put it up for sale the second set was on the way out. When I rocked the steering wheel I could see the front tires jiggling. Can't imagine how bad this would happen if spindles wore into the actual steel wheel.
 

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So you basically remove the stock bushings from the front wheels. Then use the front wheel bearings from an X300 to replace them. No other spacers or different hardware is needed? Just put the stock washer and E clip back on the spindles?

Wish I would have known about this modification when I had my L108. Even greasing them more than religiously they still wore out. By the time I put it up for sale the second set was on the way out. When I rocked the steering wheel I could see the front tires jiggling. Can't imagine how bad this would happen if spindles wore into the actual steel wheel.
It is a very simple fix, and yes just remove the bushings and replace with bearings. Some info here: John Deere Front Wheel Bearing Update
No spacers or other hardware required. It took me longer to jack the tractor up and get the wheels of the spindles than to remove/replace the bushings.
 

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It is a very simple fix, and yes just remove the bushings and replace with bearings. Some info here: John Deere Front Wheel Bearing Update
No spacers or other hardware required. It took me longer to jack the tractor up and get the wheels of the spindles than to remove/replace the bushings.
How much money can JD be saving using bushings? For a premium tractor (yes the 100 series) the bearings should be standard.
 

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How much money can JD be saving using bushings? For a premium tractor (yes the 100 series) the bearings should be standard.
The L.. LA.. STX.. Sabre.. Scotts, were not premium mowers. Yup.. They did cost more. BUT.. What happened was, they out lived everyones expectations! A near impossible feat in todays market place. Still working on em everyday! They lost that with the D series IMHO.

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How much money can JD be saving using bushings? For a premium tractor (yes the 100 series) the bearings should be standard.
I completely agree. The whole front end, at least on my LA135, is a disappointment. I replaced the bushings in the wheels, and it made a big difference. But I was never able to get grease into the grease fitting on the vertical part above the spindle (not sure what it is called). I just couldn't pump any grease in there. So while I had the wheels off I removed the spindles, and also removed the grease zerks. It turns out that on one side, the opening behind the zerk was completely caked with crap. Since I was never able to get grease in there, it had to have happened at the factory. It is such a small opening, with very, very little room for any grease to get in there. Anyway, I put a little bit of grease on the spindle, put it all back together and put the grease gun on the zerk. Good to go.

It is a good thing that I am somewhat mechanically inclined so I knew how to do it. But Average Joe Homeowner would have no idea, and would have been fighting the steering forever. Something as seemingly minor like that could cause someone to switch brands. Lost customers=not a solid business plan.
 
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