Green Tractor Talk banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Greetings! Does anyone have any experience with the land leveler attachment in the below link? I have a steep drive. Actually two steep drives. One to the house and one to the barn. I just got a 3038e and have a box blade. However, this attachment looks more operator friendly to smoothing out the road after wash outs. I am just curious how well it works on hills. Thanks for any info.

Tractor Land Plane - Tractor Land Leveler - 3 point Hitch
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
220 Posts
I have a Cammond heavy duty model land plane. I have no experience with either of those two brands. The answer is; that device is exactly what is needed to maintain a gravel road/drive. I do not know what you refer to as steep but they will work on grades up to whatever your tractor can handle. I have used one on a 25-30% (percent) grade. You still need to have proper drainage with good ditches. That type of unit will not cut a ditch very well at all. It will maintain a crown very well and will actually create a crown in your road if used correctly.

King Cutter has a pretty good rep. Folks seem to like EA; they tend to build for the smaller SCUTs. Weight is your friend with these units. The max that your tractor can handle is what you want. Do not go for the light weight ones. I think EA may have different weight/hardiness models.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
220 Posts
Went and looked at the specs.
My Cammond 84" is 935 lbs
The King Cutter 84" is 515 lbs
The EA 84" is 611 lbs
The compact Cammond 84" is 550 lbs.

You can see the weight difference which is basically steel, robustness and to a degree the length of the body design. I also have a larger tractor so I am not recommending that you go with mine at 935 lbs as your tractor could not handle it. Just pointing out things.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
160 Posts
2nd.

Go heavy. It will be one of those implement that makes you wonder why you didn't get it earlier. You still need to maintain ditches some other way (rear blade and loader for me), but it will almost effortlessly smooth and maintain crown on a road. It is also great for smoothing yards once the general grade has been set.
 

·
Fit Rite Hydraulics
Joined
·
663 Posts
I suggest that you consider a unit that is either the same width or maybe up to 6" wider than what your tractor is. Then look for that size unit as heavy as you can find with as long of runners as you can find. This will provide you with the overall best performance and use of the implement. there are many manufacturers of these types of imp-lements, but weight is king when it comes to about any type of grading.

Here are a few pictures of mine, small unit is a 5 footer at about 800lbs and the 7 footer is 1400lbs. Both work VERY well for me. :good2:
 

Attachments

·
Fit Rite Hydraulics
Joined
·
663 Posts
^^ hard for me to focus on the tractor and leveler, Love the scenery there!!!
Thanks, one of my favorite places. I guess that I could crop the pictures, but then it looses some perspective. :bye:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,257 Posts
Thanks, one of my favorite places. I guess that I could crop the pictures, but then it looses some perspective. :bye:
If you dont mind me asking...where are these pics taken?

Thanks
 

·
Fit Rite Hydraulics
Joined
·
663 Posts
If you dont mind me asking...where are these pics taken?

Thanks
About 80 miles North East of downtown San Diego California. 4000' elevation looking at mountains across the valley that are 5000'+. :cool:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
554 Posts
I agree with everyone that weight is king with grading, how ever land planes are a high price to pay for such occasional use, granted they do a great job and do it faster but not so much better to justfy the cost to me. You have a box blade, use the rippers set just below the cutting edge to cut the high spots and go slow to prevent washboarding. I did our mile long road when I had my 1026R with a 60'' Box blade and the neighbors loved me for it(the county only grades the road twice a year).
Remember when working a hillside drive to work from the bottom up. just my 2 cents. Good luck with what ever you decide. :drinks:
 
  • Like
Reactions: dieselshadow

·
Fit Rite Hydraulics
Joined
·
663 Posts
I agree with everyone that weight is king with grading, how ever land planes are a high price to pay for such occasional use, granted they do a great job and do it faster but not so much better to justfy the cost to me. You have a box blade, use the rippers set just below the cutting edge to cut the high spots and go slow to prevent washboarding. I did our mile long road when I had my 1026R with a 60'' Box blade and the neighbors loved me for it(the county only grades the road twice a year).
Remember when working a hillside drive to work from the bottom up. just my 2 cents. Good luck with what ever you decide. :drinks:
Just a simple question, do you have or have you ever used a LPGB? (land plane grader blade)

My experience is that there is NO COMPARISION when finish grading a road with a good box blade vs a good LPGB. I have both in both 5' and 7' sizes. I have 2 & 3/8 miles of roads and fence lines to take care of. If a person does their road 3-4 times a year, I would guess that doing the job with a LPGB vs a BB would save a person at the minimum of 1/2 the time if not 2/3 time spent with a better outcome. I suppose that it comes down to how much time a person has and their own circumstances. It also depends on what quality of implements a person purchases as to which implement costs more. My box blades cost more than my LPGBs. The LPGBs get used more often than the BBs, but that is just me and my current situation.

I am a weekender and when stuff needs to get done, I need to get it done as quickly as possible. Of course this varies person-person and with each persons conditions.

Just my 2 cents. :bye:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
430 Posts
I agree with Mtnviewranch on this. I have both 4ft landplane and boxblades, larger 8ft landplane and a 7ft Gannon boxblade. For road maintenance the landplanes are hard to beat. They are also great for smoothing up lawn areas which is my main use for them. You can save some money if you can weld too. Materials with new heavy duty grader blades will cost about $125/ft. so a 5' model would be about $600 to build. That is what I would recommend for a 3038 and should weigh about 600 to 750 lbs. My 4' landplane weighs in at 420 lbs. and the 8' landplane weighs in about 880 lbs.

Heres pics of the two planes I built, there is a thread here in attachments on the smaller build from last year.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
381 Posts
Up here in this rocky ground this is what I use for most everything.
To work up ground, food plots, yard pasture renovation, land leveling, etc. I can use it 2" to 5" deep.

For the gravel road I usually run it 2" deep and occasionally run one side or the other 1 1/2" deeper.
I may have to make more passes over the given surface to get what I want, but one tool with or without a section of chain link as a drag, seems to do it all............ So far............. And for less money spent for a dedicated implement.......

Your use may very.....
Good luck
------
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
381 Posts
Oh Snap....... Picture troubles......
------
Cultivatorwithgagewheels2.jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,257 Posts
I've a question for those that have used a leveler on a yard/pasture. How do you approach it? Do you till first? Or just start dragging it? Will it pull up all the grass/weeds or just the high spots? Will it work on fairly thick grass or do you have problems of it clumping up? ok...that was more than one question, but depending on the answers, I may have to build me one. To work over my 3 acre washboard of a pasture thats been riddled by moles and try down and attempt to make it a yard.

Also...where would you recommend buying the cutting edge,what size metal do you recommend for the side's/runners,angle iron for a 60" wide that will be pulled by my 2520?
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
20,976 Posts
I've a question for those that have used a leveler on a yard/pasture. How do you approach it? Do you till first? Or just start dragging it? Will it pull up all the grass/weeds or just the high spots? Will it work on fairly thick grass or do you have problems of it clumping up? ok...that was more than one question, but depending on the answers, I may have to build me one. To work over my 3 acre washboard of a pasture thats been riddled by moles and try down and attempt to make it a yard.

Also...where would you recommend buying the cutting edge,what size metal do you recommend for the side's/runners,angle iron for a 60" wide that will be pulled by my 2520?
I was going to ask the same thing Randy.:good2:


Here's a few more.:laugh:
Does the cutting edge extend below the runners? If so, how much? What angle should the blade be offset to? Left or right?


I've been contemplating building one myself....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
430 Posts
I've a question for those that have used a leveler on a yard/pasture. How do you approach it? Do you till first? Or just start dragging it? Will it pull up all the grass/weeds or just the high spots? Will it work on fairly thick grass or do you have problems of it clumping up? ok...that was more than one question, but depending on the answers, I may have to build me one. To work over my 3 acre washboard of a pasture thats been riddled by moles and try down and attempt to make it a yard.

Also...where would you recommend buying the cutting edge,what size metal do you recommend for the side's/runners,angle iron for a 60" wide that will be pulled by my 2520?

What you can get away with while leveling varies. In thick grass you can slide over it and cut off the mounds leaving most of the grass. I set my blades flush with the bottom wear strips because I use this primarily for finish grading and smoothing. Depending on the problems you need to deal with you have to decide whether tilling is needed, you can get best results if you till imo. I say this because you can get alot of grass clumping if it isn't tilled throughly.

In years past my dad and I would disk a field deep and make many passes across a field to get them smooth with a drag type harrow. The landplane grader can get it smoother and more planer in one or two passes. The harrow has the advantage of allowing grass and debris to pass through it more easily so sometimes it still works better.

For most new lawns I put in today I will usually till them first then smooth with the landplane then broadcast the seed and cover with a pine straw rake and roll with a water filled roller. This method has worked out the best for me so far and leaves a smooth surface with good grass cover within a few months.

The smaller 4ft land plane in my prior post would be a good size for a 2520. I built this primarily for lawn work and touch up work around trees and tight spots where the larger tractor can't fit. It is great for smaller lawns and has saved me moving the larger equipment numerous times. The blades are set straight on both of my landplanes for this type work. If you intend to use it for gravel driveways and want to stir up the gravel more and aid in crowning the drive then consider dripping the blade below the skids 3/4 inch and angling them 10 degrees. Recognize that lowering the blades mean it is always cutting and that may or may not be a good thing.

I will try to post a link to the 4' landplane build from last year, it has more details. Here's a picture of the 3ph harrow I built for $250 in 2009, 8ft width and works pretty well. Everything Attachments sells a good pine straw rake that is handy for lots of general tasks too, here's a couple of pics of it too.
 

Attachments

1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top