Green Tractor Talk banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I’m looking for some input on land planes for doing landscaping. My parents just finished building their retirement home and we’re going to do all the landscaping around the house. The yard is pretty ruff with high and low spots so what’s a good working size on a 1025R. I’m also thinking about building my own. So if anyone has done that please share photos.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
751 Posts
Just my opinion, but I have a LandPride GS0560 grading scraper, and sometimes I think I should have bought the 48" one. It's about all the tractor can pull if it loads up. A lot depends on soil moisture, too damp and it clumps up and won't spill over the blades right and can stop the tractor. I have loaded rear tires but not wheel weights and can find myself running out of traction.

DSCF9065 - Copy.JPG
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,787 Posts
Just my opinion, but I have a LandPride GS0560 grading scraper, and sometimes I think I should have bought the 48" one. It's about all the tractor can pull if it loads up. A lot depends on soil moisture, too damp and it clumps up and won't spill over the blades right and can stop the tractor. I have loaded rear tires but not wheel weights and can find myself running out of traction.

View attachment 666936
Agreed.
I got a Frontier 60" because it's what dealer had and he gave me a great deal unassembled.
I think a 48" is more suited for my 1025.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,428 Posts
Kind of depends on the material you are moving. If you are just going to use it to smooth a gravel driveway a 60 inch would probably work fine with a 1 series. If you are moving dirt then maybe a 48 inch might be better. I have 60 inch on my 3025E and that's the right size when I use is on my soil that is mostly clay and rock. When the clay is wet then I can bog my tractor down pretty good. No way a 1 series would be able to drag it through that.

If you are landscaping a yard with it consider this before buying (this is based on my experience with the same task):

1. If you have to do significant leveling, you may consider a box blade at first or using the daylights out of your FEL to get a rough level.

2. Land planes move dirt just like a box blade but about 2 inches max at a time. A box blade with move much more than per pass and is good for moving lots of dirt.

3. If you have significant debris in your yard like roots and rocks consider making passes with a landscape rake first. That implement is really good for getting that kind of stuff up. I have one and it did an awesome job of getting that kind of junk up. I had to do that before I even thought of landplaning.

4. If your yard is nothing but rocks consider renting a Harley Rake or Rock Hound. I have never used either but from what I have been told and seen on You Tube they do a good job of getting rocks up from the first couple inches of dirt. The other alternative is to bring in top soil. Not sure where you live but I have nothing but clay and rock here on my land. Not even weeds grew on my cleared land for the first 18 months it was cleared.

I have the land plane and the rake but do not have a box blade that works on my current tractor. I wish I did although I am terrible at using one for finish work. Good luck with your project and hopefully it doesn't rain too much on you while you do it!:bigthumb:
 
  • Like
Reactions: PJR832

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,334 Posts
I agree with the 48" size for the 1025R for the land plane or box blade. If you are going to be using a landscape rake, a larger size will work on the 1 series as the one I have is 60".

I have a rear rake, box blade, rear blade and several other rear ground engaging implements, all from Frontier and I find that it's easy to load the rear implements up when operating and reaching the point where you are fighting traction more than making the progress you could, if the implement was a tad smaller.

With the 48" size, on the land plane or box blade, you are at the right balance of load on the machine and still making forward progress and not fighting the traction issues all of the time. In my area, it can be clay soil and you go 100 yards and it's sandy loam soil. For the best balance of keeping the implement working and the machine properly moving, I would strongly suggest the 48" sized implements if they are ground engaging, for the 1025R.

The rear landscape rake, 60" is fine because it's not digging as deep and by time you are using the landscape rake, the soil is turned up and often easier to move as the landscape rake is often used for the finishing process. Plus at 60" on the landscape rake, you are covering your tire tracks even when turning all but the sharpest "corners".

If you do end up building an implement yourself, I would attempt to keep it in the same weight category as the "commercially built" units based upon their width. With the 1 series, it's wise to remain cognizant of the implements weight, especially for the FEL or any front mounted implements, but also for any on the rear 3 point. Every extra pound of implement is taking some of the capacity of the 1 series or any machine, for that matter.

You can find the finished weight of most implements on their manufacturers website and I would recommend keeping the weight in mind so you don't end up with something you put a lot of time and effort into making but might end up being a struggle for the tractor to use.
 
  • Like
Reactions: PJR832

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,587 Posts
Frontier now makes a LP1060L to consider. Can’t comment on how it will work for the 1025 as I traded to a 2025 and got the landplane. I did that around thanksgiving but between work and rain. I haven’t tried it out yet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
203 Posts
I had the EA Attachments 54” box blade made for scuts and the 1025r pulled it well. I sold it and purchased the LP 48” land plane and it taxes the 1025r pretty good in certain situations. I lose traction sometimes going up hill.


‘17 1025r w/FEL
(2) 80 JD carts
18 JD cart
Land Pride 4’ land plane
Land Pride 1258 tiller
Land Pride FDR 1660
Frontier ss1023 broadcast spreader
Victory EF155 flail mower
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
536 Posts
I took off the high spots with my 48" box plane from Frontier . . . it has a box behind the cutting blade that helps fill in holes and a blade on the back side so I can push dirt while backing up . . . works well for my needs

My soil varies from loam to ground sandstone to clay . . . after the major leveling I just rototilled the hell out of the yard and then passed the box plane to do a final packing and leveling . . . seeding in the spring
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
255 Posts
I have a heavy (not hte light weight one) Frontier 48" box blade and can easily bog down the 1025R. With top n tilt hydraulic control, it's easier to work than without hydraulics, but it still takes practice and constant vigilance to get a smooth surface job. With a 60" Frontier land plane I don't bog down as easily, but it still requires vigilance to get a smooth gravel or clay/adobe soil surface. I'm very glad I got the 60" land plane vs a 48" plane. The 1025R handles it well if you're paying attention to the job. A box blade over 48" would be too much for a 1025R in my soils, but OK if the gravel isn't too heavy or deep. I'm glad I have only a 48" BB.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top