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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Today I stopped by the metal recyclers. Something I do whenever I'm in the area. Today I spied a 60 gallon air tank from an upright air compressor.
I gave $50 for it, and we loaded it up in the back of my truck.

I've seen several members builds, and that sparked my interest to do the same.
If anyone has any pointers, ideas, anything to lead me in the right direction, I'll be taking notes :thumbup1gif:

The tank is approximately 22" x 48"
I have a roller assembly with three rollers in parallel, 36" long. After I cut everything off and get it cleaned up, I'll lay the tank on the rollers and spin it to find center top and bottom.
The bottom drain cap will get sealed and the small valve removed and welded shut. The top where it fed in from the pump, I'll put a threaded plug. The large hole on the top, I'll find a plug for that as well. I was thinking of making it easy, by welding a short piece of pipe, center, top and bottom. The maybe another piece of pipe that slips over that, welded to a piece of plate, as the bearings. Then build the frame work. Pillow Block Bearings would be ideal. I might go that route instead. I'm thinking about adding a tray so it spans from bearing to bearing, as a later option to add more weight.
 

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Old Pa-pa
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That will give you 500 lbs. if filled with water plus whatever iron weight involved.

Good project. :good2:
 

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Before you get too involved with fabrication tap around the bottom of the tank with a light ball peen hammer. Some of these old air compressor tanks were replaced due to age, rust and subsequent leakage. This tank has a build date of 1994 and was likely in service ~ 20 years or more. Hopefully it was drained frequently.

FYI...........YMMV :hi:
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Before you get too involved with fabrication tap around the bottom of the tank with a light ball peen hammer. Some of these old air compressor tanks were replaced due to age, rust and subsequent leakage. This tank has a build date of 1994 and was likely in service ~ 20 years or more. Hopefully it was drained frequently.

FYI...........YMMV :hi:
Definitely a good thing to keep in mind when looking for a tank. :thumbup1gif:Especially finding one in a scrap yard. This one was standing upright among some others. After one of the guys helped me drag it out, and I seen the tank was it's intended shape, that was my next concern. The drain valve was open. Good sign. And looking at the bottom outside it looked to be solid. A few taps with a chunk of steel and I was convinced I had something worthwhile.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
I cut off the top platform so I could remove the big plug, the pressure relief valve was in. Was that bugger ever GLUED in place. I used a 2" ANCRA EXTREME strap to cinch it to a main upright in my shop. I put a pipe-wrench on the plug, it wouldn't budge. I grabbed a 3ft piece of pipe for a cheater bar. Wouldn't budge. Cinched the strap up some more and really laid into the cheater bar, nope. At that point I was thinking if I REALLY lay into it, I may knock the support out. LOL. In comes the Rose-Bud Torch for a little heat action. BAM, it breaks free. That's some good thread sealer. I grabbed a flashlight and peered in the 2-1/2" hole to look at the bottom of the tank. It wasn't bad, for rust. Then I made sure the area was clear, and knocked the tank over on the concrete floor. Clangity...CLANGITY..KLANGITY...KLANG KLANG. That sort of hurt the ears. Then I stood the tank up and peered inside the hole. Dusty, couldn't see a thing in there. I fired up my air compressor, and grabbed the shop vac. Air nozzle feeding air into the pump inlet, Shopvac drawing out the 2-1/2 hole. The pressurizing worked out good to flush the scale. Looks good. I'll add some POR-15 for piece of mind before seal the plugs. :thumbup1gif:

Speak up. My ears are still ringin!!
 

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Youd probably be best to cut the drains out that are in it now instead of intending to use them.
What I mean is that you do not want to use whats there to drain and fill, as you wont be able to empty the water out of it, and you will certainly want to if it ever freezes in your area.

My roller was build from 1/2" steel pipe, 24" in diameter and 48" long. The drains are as close to the rolling edge as they can be, and it still doesnt get all the water out, which isnt too big a deal with what little is left, although it does get pretty nasty if left in there for very long.
Mine uses standard pipe plugs and fittings, I believe 1.25" ID. I can fit the end of the hose in for filling. Takes forever.
Oh, and I have one on each end, at opposite points, to provide a vent when draining, otherwise it takes considerably longer to drain.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
All good mentions, Jim.
I got too many projects in the works for being a gimp. I may end up getting a buddy to weld it all together for me. If I can get hold of the turkey.
I did round up some 3/16" wall 2" square tubing, and some 3/8" x 3" flat bar. :thumbup1gif:
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I got a little ambitious and cut the base off. Then cleaned things up. The tank measures 22" x 40" to where the radius begins.
Looking at the 2-1/2" top hole, and the pressure in, inlet, they're both staying. No modifications. I'll roll the opposite end up a 4x4 to drain it. Should be fine.
The one-piece axle is a good plan. :thumbup1gif:
I'm done messing with it for now. My left hand not being of much use, just tears on me using just the right. Running the cut-off grinder did nothing for the right rotator cuff.
Surgery shouldn't be too far off, at the rate I'm being stubborn. Yippie.
 

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The biggest thing I'd change is to use one piece of round bar running through the tank as a single axle instead of the stub axles made from the pins as in the Instructables article.
Would you run that bar through a pipe welded into the tank? If not how would you make a water tight seal around the axle?

Interesting project Boonie! I like the rounded ends.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Would you run that bar through a pipe welded into the tank? If not how would you make a water tight seal around the axle?

Interesting project Boonie! I like the rounded ends.
It could get done either way. No matter which method, nice welds are a must.
The roller project is not high on the list at the moment. I'll eventually get back to it.

I'd use sand instead of water, then you don't have to drain it.
I thought about going that route with a 100lb Propane tank, which I also have.
That 60 gallon tank filled with sand, I wouldn't even think of filling it to the large hole of the tank. Maybe half.
 

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Would you run that bar through a pipe welded into the tank? If not how would you make a water tight seal around the axle?

Interesting project Boonie! I like the rounded ends.
As Boonie said, either way. My intention would be to seal-weld the axle to the tank since it's going to be running in pillow-block bearings.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Looking at Axle Shaft stock

I stopped by the fab shop to scope out axle shaft.
I figure given the size (and potential weight (765.6lbs) of sand) that 1" 4140 is a good choice.
Based on what I was told 1" would be sufficient for up-to 1200lbs rolling weight if filled with concrete. Depending on the mix, even more.

I'm not set in stone yet, just looking into materials and how I want to go about my build.
Any input from those who've built a roller, my ears are open.
 

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I wish you were closer,, I would give you a piece of 1 1/2" cold rolled solid steel bar,,
I literally have more than a ton of it,,,

If it were me,, I would use a piece of schedule 80 pipe,, about 2 1/2",,,

Diameter FAR trumps solid steel,,
 

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I forgot to mention, I did use pipe when I built mine,,
the drawbar yoke is made out of the 1 1/2" solid steel,, to add weight,,



When I pull it wide open with the JD 650, it will fly 6" in the air if it hits an immovable rock,,, :laugh:
most times the rock is driven down if it is small enough,,,
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I wish you were closer,, I would give you a piece of 1 1/2" cold rolled solid steel bar,,
I literally have more than a ton of it,,,

If it were me,, I would use a piece of schedule 80 pipe,, about 2 1/2",,,

Diameter FAR trumps solid steel,,
The 1-1/2", that would be a heck of an axle for sure, and add some heft. LOL. The Sch80 pipe I've also considered. That would be pipe in pipe type of bearing? I've been keeping serviceability in mind.
 
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