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Discussion Starter #1
The Kubota M6800 has been mostly in the shed since we bought it as work and weather meant there just wasn't a lot of time to work on or with it. We have been using it some to move hay which has worked out well. It was slow cranking when we bought it and was getting a bit worse so yesterday I decided to pull the battery, clean posts and terminals, check the ground connection etc.

Most of that looked ok but the ground may have had a little corrosion at the strap to frame connection. The positive battery cable had a replacement bolt on cable end and it was made for a smaller cable so that wasn't the best connection. I didn't have the correct cable end with me but will get one or may just measure the cable and buy a new cable. . . All of that helped the cranking some but reading the manual on the tractor also gave some insight.

For years, when we park the tractor after moving hay we lowered the 3ph hay forks to the ground to keep people or cows from getting hurt. Then with the tractor off, we'd raise the control lever back to a high position so the forks would come up instead of forgetting about them and dragging them when backing out of the shed. With the red tractors, that wasn't an issue. Start the tractor and in a half second or so the forks would come up. There seemed to be almost a delay circuit in the hydraulics so the engine could come up to speed.

The Kubota manual specified to always start the tractor with the controls in the lowest position. This tractor has a physically smaller starter and I guess the additional starting load of the hydraulics is too much even with just the empty forks on the back.

Different color, different procedures. Maybe I need to read the entire manual! (Actually, I've read it once but quickly and just need to go back and look for the fine print.)

Treefarmer
 

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The Kubota manual specified to always start the tractor with the controls in the lowest position. This tractor has a physically smaller starter and I guess the additional starting load of the hydraulics is too much even with just the empty forks on the back.
My guess is this is more of a safety police induced procedure to avoid having a sudden movement of implements when the engine starts which could injure unsuspecting bystanders.
 

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My guess is this is more of a safety police induced procedure to avoid having a sudden movement of implements when the engine starts which could injure unsuspecting bystanders.

I have to agree. I leave my Kubota FEL up and the arm support tube is resting on a lally column for support so I can back my RTV further in garage and I have never had an issue with this procedure. They do crank a little slow but always fire.
 

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I agree that reading the operator's manual is a very good idea although many tractor,equipment,vehicle owners must think it's a "waste of time". On subject of 3 pt attempting to raise while starting engine it's possible that Kubota hyd pump reacts faster than an older red tractor which puts a greater load on starter & battery.
 

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Then again, it appears the JD operator's manual contain the same language. I found similar language in all the manuals I checked under both STARTING and STOPPING procedures.

Parking Safely

1. Stop machine on a level surface, not on a slope.
2. Disengage PTO and stop attachments.
3. Lower attachments to the ground.
4. Lock park brake.
5. Stop engine.
6. Remove key.
7. Wait for engine and all moving parts to stop before you leave the operator’s station.
8. Close fuel shut off valve before servicing the fuel system, if your machine is equipped.
9. Disconnect the battery ground cable before making repairs to electrical system or doing any welding.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Just different

I have to agree. I leave my Kubota FEL up and the arm support tube is resting on a lally column for support so I can back my RTV further in garage and I have never had an issue with this procedure. They do crank a little slow but always fire.
I agree that reading the operator's manual is a very good idea although many tractor,equipment,vehicle owners must think it's a "waste of time". On subject of 3 pt attempting to raise while starting engine it's possible that Kubota hyd pump reacts faster than an older red tractor which puts a greater load on starter & battery.
Then again, it appears the JD operator's manual contain the same language. I found similar language in all the manuals I checked under both STARTING and STOPPING procedures.

Parking Safely

1. Stop machine on a level surface, not on a slope.
2. Disengage PTO and stop attachments.
3. Lower attachments to the ground.
4. Lock park brake.
5. Stop engine.
6. Remove key.
7. Wait for engine and all moving parts to stop before you leave the operator’s station.
8. Close fuel shut off valve before servicing the fuel system, if your machine is equipped.
9. Disconnect the battery ground cable before making repairs to electrical system or doing any welding.
It is a safety issue but as my brother and I are the only two people involved, lowering the forks and letting them come back up has worked well for a lot of years. I don't like leaving any implement up not only for safety but to relieve pressure on the hydraulic system. Yes, it's designed to hold pressure but our tractors may be stopped for five minutes or 5 days depending on which tractor and what we are doing.

The hay forks we use on the back are pretty stout and pretty heavy and I think Kubota is a little light on their starting system. Consequently, it seems the additional load is just too much. Fortunately, as mentioned above the engine fires off quickly. Cleaning the terminals and ground strap helped and as the opportunity presents itself I may clean the positive cable where it connects to the solenoid. If both of us happen to be available, we can also check voltage drop while cranking but that needs two people or at least it's much easier with two. It's our first Kubota tractor, although not the first orange paint as we had Allis Chalmers back in the day. So it's something of a learning curve as well.

Treefarmer
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Slow progress

After using the tractor for a month or so to feed hay, it's starting to feel more comfortable. The 3ph was set to drop slowly and had to adjust that and it continues to crank slowly but has started quickly. We still haven't swapped out the bucket but the little stuff is getting done. So far, it's been about what we hoped. A pretty basic tractor with a few issues but no surprises.

Treefarmer
 

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After reading through this thread thoroughly, there is simply no way to make any sense of any of it.
This is 2019 and we are in the most technologically advanced country in the world.
There is just no reason to be putting one's self through the frustration of having to operate 3rd world antiquated off-colored equipment!:laugh:
J/K of course.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Lol

After reading through this thread thoroughly, there is simply no way to make any sense of any of it.
This is 2019 and we are in the most technologically advanced country in the world.
There is just no reason to be putting one's self through the frustration of having to operate 3rd world antiquated off-colored equipment!:laugh:
J/K of course.
LOL, Sometimes I'm just a third world kind of guy. You know, after all the fancy electronic stuff has crapped out, the old stuff is held together with baling twine and duct tape but still running. In all honesty, my green 790 and the Kubota share some of the same characteristics- nothing fancy, few creature comforts but they get the job done. After I win the lottery, I'll change and go for first world problems.

Treefarmer
 

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Just giving you some good natured ribbing!

I would have given Orange a serious look if there were a local dealer.
The local service & 0% interest kept me on Green Iron!
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Yep, gotta expect some ribbing

Just giving you some good natured ribbing!

I would have given Orange a serious look if there were a local dealer.
The local service & 0% interest kept me on Green Iron!
I expect some ribbing when opening a thread about orange equipment on a green tractor site. It's interesting to see the different ways that companies approach a similar product. We've got very old IH equipment, a semi-old 790 JD and a semi-old Kubota and while the end result is pretty much the same, the way the engineers get there is definitely different. I was amused to figure out the factory rear hydraulic on the Kubota was actually a John Deere standard while the dealer added second hookup was ISO. I'm sure there was a reason for that, probably a previous owner had ISO on his implements. My 790 has a manual preheat controlled by the switch key but the Kubota is thermostatically controlled and doesn't think about coming on until it's like 10 F. The IH tractors had more hydraulics, even when the size difference is considered but the English built IH leaks everything while the American built IH was pretty tight for a long time. I think as time goes on, there's more convergence among manufacturing in part because there are more standards to meet for safety, emissions, lighting etc. Someday it will be like all mid size sedans now- I can't tell them apart unless I can see an emblem.

Treefarmer
 
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