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That looks great!!!! I've been wanting to do that to mine for awhile...Thanks for the post!!
 
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Thanks Ray_PA. :thumbup1gif:
 
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Looks great! Thanks for the info. Do you think that there will be any issue with them getting too hot for their housings?
 

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I bought a set of those to replace the bulbs in my 2720 rear work lights and was very disappointed. While the LED bulb seemed whiter and brighter, the light just didn't make it to the ground. I ended up switching to the factory LED work lights and those made a huge difference. I did not try changing the head light bulbs to LED.

Below you can see the comparison. The halogen is on the left, LED on the right. Everything looked good until I tried using the tractor at night and that's when I discovered that the light from the LED replacement bulb just didn't go very far.

Further research found others with a similar experience. Apparently, while simply swapping your tungsten or halogen bulb to an LED bulb may seem like an inexpensive upgrade, the results can vary.

E26R4003.jpg
 

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Thanks Ray! How did you figure out which bulb to swap over to? I've been unsuccessful in trying to do this in the past. All the cross reference charts I have found have given incorrect information.
The 1025R head light is P/N R136239 which according to JD parts is a 50 watt type 888 bulb. This is the same bulb used in the forward / rear work light kits.

The 1025R fender lights use bulb P/N AXE16948 which is a 37.5 watt type 862 bulb.
 

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Looks great! Thanks for the info. Do you think that there will be any issue with them getting too hot for their housings?
They are LED. LED bulbs generate virtually no heat.
 
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Are you sure that your head lights are lit in the second photo? There appears to be no light whatsoever on your brush guard.
Yep, they were on. Those are the OEM bulbs. Not very bright.
 

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The 1025R head light is P/N R136239 which according to JD parts is a 50 watt type 888 bulb. This is the same bulb used in the forward / rear work light kits.

The 1025R fender lights use bulb P/N AXE16948 which is a 37.5 watt type 862 bulb.
The only difference between the headlight bulbs, fender worklight bulbs and the OEM rear/front worklight bulbs is the wattage. They all have the same connector. If you go with LED, the wattage is not an issue. The headlights, fender and rear worklights can use the same bulb.
 
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They are LED. LED bulbs generate virtually no heat.
Ok. I thought most LED bulbs had heat sinks in their base to pull out the heat that is generated.
 
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Thanks Ray! How did you figure out which bulb to swap over to? I've been unsuccessful in trying to do this in the past. All the cross reference charts I have found have given incorrect information.

Jeff


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The OEM headlight, fender and rear worklight bulbs are all 881 base bulbs. They are slightly different wattages OEM but the bases are all 881. If they are replaced with LED bulbs with an 881 base, the only thing you have to watch is the length of the LED's are longer. This slightly longer length is not a problem in any of the OEM lights on the 1025R.
An LED is going to have a lessor wattage draw than a comparable incandescent or halogen bulb. You really need to look at the lumens of light output and the color of the light to really compare bulbs. Also, LED's create virtually no heat.
 

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Ok. I thought most LED bulbs had heat sinks in their base to pull out the heat that is generated.
LED's do not create light by a heated element so there is no need for heat sinks. Because they are light emitting diodes (LED) which is really a semiconductor, they actually draw little current compared to an incandescent or halogen light bulb with the same lumens of light output. Current (wattage) draw is what generates heat.
 

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The 1025R head light is P/N R136239 which according to JD parts is a 50 watt type 888 bulb. This is the same bulb used in the forward / rear work light kits.

The 1025R fender lights use bulb P/N AXE16948 which is a 37.5 watt type 862 bulb.
My work lights and headlights are marked as 886 bases. Fender lights are marked as 862.

I don't know the specifics between 888, 886 and 881 but I bought what was supposed to be 886 equivalent leds and they didn't even come close.

Jeff


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I bought a set of those to replace the bulbs in my 2720 rear work lights and was very disappointed. While the LED bulb seemed whiter and brighter, the light just didn't make it to the ground.
Same here. I have those exact bulbs and in the Deere work lights there is no beam just a bright glow. So the light housing may play a large part in how they perform.
 

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Are you sure that your head lights are lit in the second photo? There appears to be no light whatsoever on your brush guard.
Upon further review of the play.... The length of a light bulb affects the focal point in the lens and how it distributes light. The Replacements Cree bulb might be a little bit longer shedding more light on the top of the brush guard because they are longer they spread out more. Once you stare into a maglite long enough this becomes evident ?
 

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Why do LED bulbs and lamp assemblies have giant heat sinks? :)
Because LED's don't work on 12 volts. They typically work on 2-3 volts, sooooo, there are usually resistors added to regulate the current needed to make the LED emit. The resistors get hot. So you're both right. LEDs give off very little heat, but the resistors needed to keep them biased do....
 

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LED's do not create light by a heated element so there is no need for heat sinks. Because they are light emitting diodes (LED) which is really a semiconductor, they actually draw little current compared to an incandescent or halogen light bulb with the same lumens of light output. Current (wattage) draw is what generates heat.
Take a look at a lot of the head light replacement kits and you will see they have giant heat sinks and even little fans mounted on the back of the LED bulbs. A LED work light will not melt the snow off the lens yet has a big aluminum housing with fins.

It seems that halogen bulbs generate heat out the front side and LED bulbs generate heat out the back side.
 
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