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Discussion Starter #1
I did a few small upgrades to my 425 this weekend, one of which being LED lighting. The rear lights work fine, however, the front lights are not working after replacing the bulbs. I know the rear ones sometimes don't work right after install and you have to flip them around so the polarity matches up. I didn't have that problem, and they worked right the first time. The front bulbs are the "insert and twist" variety, so no flipping the polarity on those. They just don't work. Any ideas? For reference, the bulbs are 1156 Amazon.com: Aucan 1156 1141 1003 7506 BA15S LED Bulbs White 20-Packs, Super Bright 3014 54-SMD LED Replacement 12 Volt RV Camper Trailer Boat Trunk Interior Lights: Automotive. Do I maybe need to disassemble the wiring and reverse the spade connectors on the lighting assemblies?
 

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Do I maybe need to disassemble the wiring and reverse the spade connectors on the lighting assemblies?
Maybe. An incandescent bulb doesn't care if the center point or the shell is the positive polarity. An LED does. Maybe the headlight sockets were wired backwards from normal from the factory. The center pin is usually the positive and the shell negative. Test the bulb sockets with a meter as to which is the positive polarity. You can test your new LEDs with some test wires and connect to the battery directly too, to make sure they're working.
 

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At less than a buck a bulb; I suspect you got defective Chinesium bulbs. It could be a resistor or lack of it problem. LED's usually run about 2-volts+/- DC depending on color as I recall, and they need the proper resistor to step down the voltage; otherwise they'll burn out in a flash.

I ordered a couple of H1's or was it H3's for my Tizio desk lamp to replace the halogen bulbs Artimede (sp) originally used. I made sure the length was correct; but I neglected to make certain the diameter was to standard specifications. They aren't and they won't fit through the hole in the lamp head. :(
 

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These are the ones I purchased for our 425. Worked great. I have purchased led lights from this site even though they are more expensive. From the research I have done when looking for vehicle bulbs they have a better warranty and give you every measurement spec needed to make sure it fits. I've used this site for flasher upgrades, dash light upgrades, and various other. 13 bulbs zero failures.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I'll check out that Super Bright LEDS site. I'm hoping the ones I already have will work, but need to play around a bit with them. They say they're for 12V systems, so I don't think I'll need a resistor. I'm guessing it's probably a polarity issue. The good news is I have enough of them to play around. I also read on a youtube comment last night that they can be pretty finicky about having clean contacts, so maybe I just need to clean the 22 years of dust out of the bulb mounts (or just get new ones). Thanks for the input all!
 

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These are the ones I purchased for our 425. Worked great. I have purchased led lights from this site even though they are more expensive. From the research I have done when looking for vehicle bulbs they have a better warranty and give you every measurement spec needed to make sure it fits. I've used this site for flasher upgrades, dash light upgrades, and various other. 13 bulbs zero failures.
I've bought some stuff from them without problems.

I'm guessing it's probably a polarity issue.
Even the wrong polarity can screw up an LED depending on the quality, and voltage and current. The easy way to remember which is which on LED's, etc is: A+ = Anode, C- = Cathode. Just like report cards. From what I've read online, resistors go on the positive side; but I've gotten some cheap premade ones with the resistor on the negative side. They work; but I consider it the equivalent of putting a switch after the load instead of before it.

The Diode part in LED is in layman's terms that I understand is similar to a check valve in piping.

If I'm all wrong; I hope some electronics experts will chime in.
 

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The Diode part in LED is in layman's terms that I understand is similar to a check valve in piping.
That’s exactly right. You have one material with excess electrons on the bottom, and cover it with a layer that has a shortage in their natural state. If you add electrons to the side with excess already it will push through and easily flow to the side with a shortage. If you try to add electrons to the side with a shortage you really must crank up the bias to breakdown the barrier of excess electrons and it usually damages the materials.





Diode is part of the name too.
 

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You need at least 1500 lumens otherwise they're not bright enough.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I went out to the garage tonight (finally got some time to work on the tractor with the Mrs. out of the house). I swapped the spade plugs around on the headlight assemblies and what do you know, they work! I guess someone had swapped them around at some point in the past 22 years, but all is good now. These things are BRIGHT! Now, if we could just get some snow here in SE PA so I can actually get some seat time!
 
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