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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all, I have a 2305 and the alternator puts out 20amps if I am correct. I have found ohms law here on the club to calculate how many LED lights that I could add but looking to do it the lazy way. I have purchased a voltmeter from Amazon.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07G57ZK3F/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o03_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
When the tractor is sitting in the garage the voltmeter shows 12.5 when I am mowing the lawn the voltmeter will show 15.0-14.5. My question is if I add LED lighting so the alternator is still charging the battery at 13 volts I should be ok? I have a wiring harness from Terraking that runs 30 amp from the battery and added a connector for LED lights. The LED lights will have there own on/off switch for each LED light. Just wanting to check with the gurus.

Thanks
Doug
 

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I can answer a lot of your questions but, I couldn't find a JD 2305 as I wanted to confirm what the OEM alternator could put out.

But let me start off with this.......if you are replacing existing lights with LEDs, your power consumption in amps will definitely drop.

As for the voltage, 12.5 before you start it up is a little low...... could be the meter you're using or the battery is just on the weak side. 13-14 during run time is normal.

If the stock alternator does in fact only have a max output of 20 amps, then I caution you to find out exactly what your new LEDs will take and put an inline fuse in that new harness to go 5-10% over the max amperage thats needed.

Obviously I am talking generically until you can shed a little more info on what your exactly doing, how many lights, are you replacing any existing ones, etc.

Edit: I did find the 2305 and it does in fact state it has a 20 amp alternator. The tractor appears to be the predecessor of the 1-2 series of today so Im wondering, could you / would you upgrade to a bigger alternator as Im fairly confident the stock wiring system could handle at least a 50 amp system.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I can answer a lot of your questions but, I couldn't find a JD 2305 as I wanted to confirm what the OEM alternator could put out.

But let me start off with this.......if you are replacing existing lights with LEDs, your power consumption in amps will definitely drop.

As for the voltage, 12.5 before you start it up is a little low...... could be the meter you're using or the battery is just on the weak side. 13-14 during run time is normal.

If the stock alternator does in fact only have a max output of 20 amps, then I caution you to find out exactly what your new LEDs will take and put an inline fuse in that new harness to go 5-10% over the max amperage thats needed.

Obviously I am talking generically until you can shed a little more info on what your exactly doing, how many lights, are you replacing any existing ones, etc.

Edit: I did find the 2305 and it does in fact state it has a 20 amp alternator. The tractor appears to be the predecessor of the 1-2 series of today so Im wondering, could you / would you upgrade to a bigger alternator as I'm fairly confident the stock wiring system could handle at least a 50 amp system.
Thanks for your reply I have replaced all of my lights with LED except the work lights that mount on top of my flashing lights on the ROPS I know that they are Halogen. I want to add a rear facing LED light and some additional lighting from the top of the ROPS if the alternator can handle it where it is not draining the battery. The Terraking wiring harness has a inline fuse of 30 amp. Yes it is the predecessor to the 1 series. It is not as refined as the 1 series but has served me well and has been a great machine.

Doug
 

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I added some LEDS to my 2305. I’m having some trouble adding more pictures. Watts divided by volts equals amps. I went fairly conservative. I’ll try to attach more info in another reply.
 

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Unfortunately, you have 2 things here working against you.

The first is, the meter you bought, while cool looking, is only measuring volts. You are perhaps going to look for one that also shows you amps, because thats where we are working with on your machine.

The second one is, the bulbs you stated which are halogen......those are by far using the most amps being used versus the rest of the bulbs in your system. If you changed out those halogens with LED bulbs, then you may be good to go with adding some more LEDs after the fact. But until you know how many amps your system is currently using, you honestly have no way to know how much farther you can go.

Would you happen to know what the bulb number is for those halogen bulbs?

PS, sorry but I cant honestly recommend any sort of amp meter at this time, as the one I use is about 20 years old and is part of a Fluke Meter package and is most likely well out of the price range of most home-owner / DIYers...... but hopefully someone can come on and recommend a cheap alternative that will work well for you.
 

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PS, sorry but I cant honestly recommend any sort of amp meter at this time, as the one I use is about 20 years old and is part of a Fluke Meter package and is most likely well out of the price range of most home-owner / DIYers...... but hopefully someone can come on and recommend a cheap alternative that will work well for you.
You are correct. The OP needs to concentrate on the AMPs and not the volts. I don't have the exact numbers in front of me but originally my 2720 was maxed out with the two forward halogen work lights and one rear facing work light.

I used a relatively inexpensive multi-meter with a clamp-on current meter function (~$40) to measure the current draw from the battery. The three halogens + head lights were around 14 AMPS. I replaced the three halogen work lights with four LED work lights which were much brighter.

When finished the current draw for the four LED lights + halogen head lights was less than 10 AMPS.
 

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Lets try this.
Nice looking setup. Using the correct formula, that system should be good to go with 7.5 amps total. Nothing to worry about with a standard sized alternator but for a 20 amp one, ouch.

Im curious though why on that system they show it using (3) 15 amp fuses. The wiring they give you will definitely handle it but, the lights barely need that. (it only needs 6 amps for the larger light bar and 1.5s for the smaller ones) Odd.
 

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Nice looking setup. Using the correct formula, that system should be good to go with 7.5 amps total. Nothing to worry about with a standard sized alternator but for a 20 amp one, ouch.

Im curious though why on that system they show it using (3) 15 amp fuses. The wiring they give you will definitely handle it but, the lights barely need that. (it only needs 6 amps for the larger light bar and 1.5s for the smaller ones) Odd.
It only uses a single fuse. I wired the switch and the relay directly to the battery. I plan on replacing all my stock bulbs with LED. I don’t blow snow or plan on do anything prolonged with them. I’ve had the tractor for 13 years and only added them this year. They are just more lip stick on the pig. I’m not sure why they show so many fuses.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Unfortunately, you have 2 things here working against you.

The first is, the meter you bought, while cool looking, is only measuring volts. You are perhaps going to look for one that also shows you amps, because thats where we are working with on your machine.

The second one is, the bulbs you stated which are halogen......those are by far using the most amps being used versus the rest of the bulbs in your system. If you changed out those halogens with LED bulbs, then you may be good to go with adding some more LEDs after the fact. But until you know how many amps your system is currently using, you honestly have no way to know how much farther you can go.

Would you happen to know what the bulb number is for those halogen bulbs?

PS, sorry but I cant honestly recommend any sort of amp meter at this time, as the one I use is about 20 years old and is part of a Fluke Meter package and is most likely well out of the price range of most home-owner / DIYers...... but hopefully someone can come on and recommend a cheap alternative that will work well for you.
Yep looked for an amp meter I did not find one that would work cost/weather-wise I figured that a voltmeter would give me some insight if I was putting too much of a load on the system. The number on the work lights is 886 Philips 12.8 50 watt. In reading other posts I got the feeling that LED replacement in the halogen housing sucks just replace the work lights with LED. If someone has a replacement LED for the halogen lights and is happy with the results I am game to give them a try just give a link and I am good to go.

Thanks
Doug
 

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If Im not mistaken, the bulbs I just used on WBs tractor (for the 881 bulb) 'should be' compatible for the 886'. If your concern is them not fitting in the headlight housing, unless its drastically different than a 2015 1025R, then you should be ok. (the bulb dimensions are smaller in length than the OEM bulb was)
Amazon has a ton of different ones, ranging from $15 - $60. You will find that most of the LED bulbs would be in the 8-0 watt range so, swapping to those would definitely be less taxing on your system and, combined with what you are wanting to put on, you should be fine.
Seeing @FortClatsop's setup, Id be more than confident that your system will handle it in light of the fact you mentioned you arent running.

PS, these are the bulbs I put into WBs machine and they fit your bulb. Just an FYI
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00NJ9MZH0/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
 

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Yep looked for an amp meter I did not find one that would work cost/weather-wise I figured that a voltmeter would give me some insight if I was putting too much of a load on the system. The number on the work lights is 886 Philips 12.8 50 watt. In reading other posts I got the feeling that LED replacement in the halogen housing sucks just replace the work lights with LED. If someone has a replacement LED for the halogen lights and is happy with the results I am game to give them a try just give a link and I am good to go.
It's not really necessary to have an ammeter in the circuit all the time. In fact, I'm not even sure I would WANT one. All you need to do is put something in-line with the battery while you are wiring and testing your lights to get a before and after comparison. It's not something that is going to change. For that purpose a $6 Harbor Freight multi-meter will work just fine.
 

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If you were to install an ammeter in the circuit, you would have to install it at the correct location in the circuit to make sure you are measuring what is going to and from the battery, not just what the alternator is putting out.

I wouldn't waste time installing an ammeter. Ammeters are sort of old school. Most people have realized, knowing how many amps are going to or from the battery is a design issue. If you do not have a large enough alternator, the system designer messed up.

That said, if you are replacing halogen bulbs with LED bulbs, your amperage draw is going to be allot less than it was OEM so adding one LED light is not going to be a problem.

You are on the right track in using ohms law to calculation total amperage load.

Concerning the fuse sizing in a circuit. The fuse is sized based on ampacity of wire used in a circuit. A fuse is not sized based on what lights or other accessory amperage draw, it is all about minimum ampacity of the wire used. Now, when wiring a circuit, it important to use a sufficient sized wire based on the accessory that you are feeding power to.

It is important to realize, in a 12 VDC circuit, voltage drop over distance is greater than a 120 VAC circuit, therefore, the length of the wire has allot to do with its ampacity.

It is also important to understand, alternator output ratings are usually rated at 6000 Alternator RPM. When the engine is idling, the actual output is going to be much less, probably 50% or less of maximum rated output.

I must say, a 20 amp alternator is not going to provide any reserve power. Considering charging the battery after starting and powering the lights, 20 amps is minimal so I wouldn't add more load to the alternator on your tractor than was there OEM.
 

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I would definitely replace all of the halogen bulbs with LED bulbs and they are readily available. Should you have an issue with your 20 AMP alternator, I have a brand new stock alternator off my 1025r which I replaced with the larger upgraded model to accommodate the electrical draw of the cab. I will make you a real deal on it once we confirm it will fit your tractor.......Just send me a PM if you need it.

I would also strongly recommend replacing the halogen "flashing / safety light" with one which is LED as some of the flashing or revolving lights draw a lot of AMPS when they are halogen. Plus, you can physically reduce the size of the light fixture and it will be MUCH brighter in the LED side.

I even replaced the halogen bulbs in my cab's dome lights shown in the photo's below and the AMP draw dropped to nearly 0 verses the few AMPS which the halogen dome lights all together were drawing. Not to mention the light output difference was simply amazing....The one photo shows half the dome light with the OEM bulb and the other half with the new LED unit, then one picture shows the light output of the entire light with the halogen bulb and the other shows the LED light output. Look at the difference in the light output on the headliner.

The process to replace the bulbs has never been easier and the LED's produce much less heat, which means they won't damage the housing and the plastic lens covers............You can hold the LED between your fingers when its on and it doesn't even get hot.

Might be a great time to polish up the exterior of the headlight housings to "clear" them up as they tend to "haze" over the years from the UV rays and the bulb heat. Some simple polishing compound and a polishing pad in the hand drill usually does wonders to restore the plastic lens. Just try a small area first and make sure the compound doesn't scratch the plastic. And make sure it's polishing compound, NOT rubbing compound as the rubbing compound is almost always too harsh for the plastic lens and will actually score it.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Thanks Sulleybear, I have replaced all of my lights with LEDS (headlight, flasher, warning). The dash lights and the work lights I got from deere are stock. For pushing snow I wanted to add a rear facing led light and more light facing forward. Love your setup looks great.

Thanks
Doug

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I would definitely replace all of the halogen bulbs with LED bulbs and they are readily available.
I would also strongly recommend replacing the halogen "flashing / safety light" with one which is LED as some of the flashing or revolving lights draw a lot of AMPS when they are halogen. Plus, you can physically reduce the size of the light fixture and it will be MUCH brighter in the LED side.

I even replaced the halogen bulbs in my cab's dome lights shown in the photo's below and the AMP draw dropped to nearly 0 verses the few AMPS which the halogen dome lights all together were drawing.
Sulley would you happen to have the part numbers of the LED bulbs you replaced for the halogens, or a link to your post that had that info?
 
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