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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
On the property I hunt, we have more than our share of hills.

We periodically bring in a local guy with a Caterpillar dozer to do large projects.

He carved out roads/paths we use to access the property. These often traverse slopes and are not level (side to side).

Is there a way to re-grade these roads to level them out? Using the FEL seems to simply maintain the issue, but there’s also the fact that I’m figuring this out as I go and I’m sure I haven’t thought of the right way to do this.

I have a 1025 with a FEL and box blade at my disposal.

I can also use my 6’ rear blade, if that offers other options.
 

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On the property I hunt, we have more than our share of hills.

We periodically bring in a local guy with a Caterpillar dozer to do large projects.

He carved out roads/paths we use to access the property. These often traverse slopes and are not level (side to side).

Is there a way to re-grade these roads to level them out? Using the FEL seems to simply maintain the issue, but there’s also the fact that I’m figuring this out as I go and I’m sure I haven’t thought of the right way to do this.

I have a 1025 with a FEL and box blade at my disposal.

I can also use my 6’ rear blade, if that offers other options.
Either one will work but might be very slow. The other issue you need to be aware of is that by leveling them water may start erosion because it can no longer run down hill in continuously. Plan for where the water can go before you start moving dirt.

If the ground is hard which is likely use the box blade rippers to loosen the top few inches in an area. Then switch to the rear blade to move the dirt to the downhill area. This will need to be compacted as much as possible or it will simply erode. You can adjust the both the box blade and rear blade side to side to cut deeper on one side than the other.

The guy with the Cat dozer must have had only a push blade not a 6 way or he could have easily put any angle desired. You will want to end up with a crown.

Did I mention to plan for where the water should go before starting?
 
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This is one of the primary uses of a "Top and Tilt" kit. By being able to raise the 3pt lift arms at different heights you can angle the implement height from side to side. It sounds like you'd be better off with that sort of a setup and a box blade to do the initial leveling. After that the back blade could be used to just clean things up on a routine basis. But, as TreeFarmer mentioned, keep drainage in mind. You don't want puddles forming and you don't want water running down the length of the road. The grade needs to shed rain water off to the sides as quickly as possible.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks guys… never thought of using the rear blade to relocate dirt like that but it makes sense.

The issue isn’t to make it dead level, a little slope is fine.

There’s sufficient slope currently that I don’t like using some sections with the 1025 and that is an issue. I want to make that grade more approximately level so using the tractor on it isn’t going to concern me.

As it is now, it’s passable but I don’t like it, and some jobs can’t be done with the tractor because I don’t like the grade on which I would have to work.

Example- yesterday I had two dead trees to drop. Then I wanted to push them off to the side with the FEL. Problem was… I’d have had to make an uphill turn (on the roadway) while pushing, and that gave me more pucker than I was willing to accept so I diced up the pile and moved it by hand.

We have sufficient ground moisture that I think the rear blade could work on its on. It’s not muddy but the ground sure isn’t baked hard like when it’s dry.

As for runoff, I was either going to keep a slight pitch to the road or install runoff ditches every so often to shunt water to the side and not let it just run the length of the road. I have one roadway that it does that and a good rain storm always equals quality time with the box blade. I gotta figure something out there. Likely ditches because the subsurface rocks there will probably prevent crowning that road.

But thank you for the ideas… they definitely make sense!
 

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2005 3320 with FEL, 1978 AC 5020 FEL, 2000 Bobcat 763
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Personally I would either rent a skid steer or get the guy who put the road in to slope it to your satisfaction. Then it will be easy to maintain in the long run. You mention multiple hills and apparently fairly steep slopes. You might also find a farmer with a big 4wd tractor who can grade it out for you easily. Although I bought a second compact tractor with bush hog, I just paid a neighboring farmer $300 to mow my fields with his bat wing. Took him 5 hours and he set the price. My son and I would have worked 50 hours to do what he did. Plus we had many pucker factor slopes that we did not want to experience. When he finished I ask him about the slopes and he looked at me and said they were not that steep.
Spend the money and do not spend your time or possibly tear up your equipment. Yes you can do it, but should you?
 
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