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Discussion Starter #1
Right now I have a couple of really old chain binders, probably mid 60's and rusted out. Haven't used them much, so I haven't needed to worry about them. Hauling heavier loads more often I'd like something a little safer. I have the 'lever' style right now, and I like the simplicity, but the ratchet style seems interesting to me as well. Anyone with experience with both or either? I think I'm leaning toward the standard lever because that's what I know, but for only a $2 difference I'd really prefer which is the better binder.

Lever:
Lever Binder 3/8'' x 1/2'' [CB145] l US Cargo Control

Ratchet:
Ratchet Chain Binders 3/8'' x 1/2'' LIMITED TIME SALE
 

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With my limited use, I can tell you that the ratchet ones are sweet. We threw out all of our lever ones and went to ratchets. We used to wire the lever ones closed. We do not have to do anything now, just load up and tighten them down.

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The lever style can cause serious injury if it slips when using a cheater pipe. Although the ratchet style is a little slower, they get my vote.


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I have the ratchets as well, Not as convenient-but I feel better about them.
 

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I have years of expierance with both, personaly I like the lever style mainly because that is what I was taught with, they are faster to work with. However they can be a pita sometimes coming loose and as DS said you can get hurt real bad if you slip up. I have used the ratchet style also, once you get use to them they are nice and the do not loosen up as bad a the lever type. If you go with the ratchet style always keep a can of WD40 with you, the one time you don't, the binder will decide to freeze up on you:banghead::laugh:
I have also herd some rumors that the DOT is trying to ban the lever type binders:unknown: I don't know if that is true or not. You will need 4 binders and 4 chains to be leagal hauling your 110 and I don't know about the DOT## everyone is talking about, but I'm sure if you need them, MSP will be happy to let you know!:mocking: Looks like a nice trailer, good luck.:drinks:
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Well I guess binder it is!

has, why do you need 4 chains and binders? Seems like overkill to me. When I hauled it the first time I had a chain in the front and back and worked quite well. If I really needed 4 then I would be able to get the lower strength chain/binders correct? The reason I was looking at the 6600's was so that I had plenty of capacity for legal reasons, at 13,200 lbs between the two it would be more than the capacity of the trailer anyway, so I figured it would be fine and legal to haul it that way. You would know better than I though, if it takes 4, then that's the way it is I guess. Thanks again!
 

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You are supposed to have a separate chain at each corner, and also one across the bucket(s) as well. Most likely you wont have a problem since you are not hauling commercially. Oh, and skip the WD40 and get some Fluid Film.
 

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You are supposed to have a separate chain at each corner, and also one across the bucket(s) as well. Most likely you wont have a problem since you are not hauling commercially. Oh, and skip the WD40 and get some Fluid Film.
Ditto on what kenny said, one at each corner. the one on the buckets is ??? I think it depends on the cop, I have never had a problem, but thats me, you do it how you feel best:unknown:. As far as the WD40 or Fluid Film, have something. When the reatchets get wet and dirty, they freeze in the winter and rust or bind up in the summer and the spray will save you alot of time & cussing if you know what I mean.:laugh:
 

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Pennsylvania DOT requires, for machines over 10,000 pounds, a chain at each corner and a chain on each bucket. Buckets, by the way, require steel and not a strap.

Don
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks for the info;

So would you look at a lower capacity chain then? Looking at the next cheaper one (4,700lb rating) it will be about $30 more to strap it at the 4 corners vs 1 in the front and back. If I did the same 6,600lb rating it would be more like $65 more. Still not sure what I'll do...
 

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A long time ago, I was hauling a JD 2020, with two chains, on a roll back and had a chain break. The tractor stayed on the bed, but I had some anxious moments waiting to get to a place where I could pull off and put on another chain. I would spend the $65.00 to protect my tractor. But it is much easier for me to spend your money. :lol:
Don
 
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When the dealer sent someone out to get my 5410 I am pretty sure they used two chains on the front and two chains with binders on the rear. They were 3/8 chain and the ratchet type binders. The chains were so worn you couldn't tell the grade. Must be about 10 years ago I worked with a guy with a drop deck detachable hauling a backhoe and he said you needed transport grade chain 3/8 minimum and ratchet binders. I will have to figure it out myself for the size of load I can carry which is less than 10,000 pounds. The stake pockets to put the chain hook on might tear first anyway. All my lever binders are made in usa but all the ratchet ones I see are made in china and rated like 5/16 transport grade (70) 3/8 for the other grade that I think is somewhere around 40 and generally silver instead of golden.

When they delivered my 5105 in 2006 I don't remember exactly how the front went but they put a shackle in the draw bar hole and had one chain and one binder going from one side of the roll back kind of truck through the shackle and back to the other side.

Fran
 

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I shuffle heavy equipment around daily, and I much prefer the ratchet binders. Once you get used to them, they're just as fast and easier to use than the lever type. No fussing with cheater bars or wrapping something around the arm to keep it from coming loose. The key to ease of use is proper lubrication. Resist the temptation to use heavy grease on the threads, the grease will dry, solidify, and cause more trouble than help. I use a spray teflon grease we have at work, but Kenny's Fluid Film idea sounds good, too.

With regard to the chains, technically it varies by state. Most states will have the exact same requirements, but in most cases the states do not have any requirements for non-commercial haulers. The rules for commercial loads are exactly as DRobinson stated. For equipment over 10,000 lbs, chains at each corner. For equipment under 10,000 lbs, one chain at each end is acceptable. You can also block equipment in, for example if you have a drop deck trailer. You can put the equipment against the step on the bed to prevent forward movement, and then chain it at the other end to prevent rearward movement. If you want to go by the book, that's about what you'll find in every state.

Practical experience is another matter. Not being commercial, they'll probably never pay you any mind. Even if they do, in my experience if the load looks like it's secured well they won't drag out the rule book to make sure you have all the Ts crossed and Is dotted. They've always been more concerned with my paperwork than the way I had things secured. Even hauling commercially through several states weigh stations are usually the only places I get checked, and even that isn't common. Most of the time they just green light me through. Since you're not commercial, you don't have to stop. I'd be surprised to hear you ever have a DOT encounter. Chain it down however you would like, either at all four corners or on each end. Just make sure it can't move around and you're set. The fact that you even know about chain ratings and how to use a chain puts you ahead of 90% of the private guys I see on the road!
 

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Not to get off the track of hauling heavy loads, but my neighbor and I both have single axle trailers, rated at less than 3000 pounds. When I haul my 445, I use a chain and binder front and rear. My neighbor loads his 2210 up tight to the headboard of the trailer, sets the parking brake and hits the road, with no tie downs at all.

Don
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I shuffle heavy equipment around daily, and I much prefer the ratchet binders. Once you get used to them, they're just as fast and easier to use than the lever type. No fussing with cheater bars or wrapping something around the arm to keep it from coming loose. The key to ease of use is proper lubrication. Resist the temptation to use heavy grease on the threads, the grease will dry, solidify, and cause more trouble than help. I use a spray teflon grease we have at work, but Kenny's Fluid Film idea sounds good, too.

With regard to the chains, technically it varies by state. Most states will have the exact same requirements, but in most cases the states do not have any requirements for non-commercial haulers. The rules for commercial loads are exactly as DRobinson stated. For equipment over 10,000 lbs, chains at each corner. For equipment under 10,000 lbs, one chain at each end is acceptable. You can also block equipment in, for example if you have a drop deck trailer. You can put the equipment against the step on the bed to prevent forward movement, and then chain it at the other end to prevent rearward movement. If you want to go by the book, that's about what you'll find in every state.

Practical experience is another matter. Not being commercial, they'll probably never pay you any mind. Even if they do, in my experience if the load looks like it's secured well they won't drag out the rule book to make sure you have all the Ts crossed and Is dotted. They've always been more concerned with my paperwork than the way I had things secured. Even hauling commercially through several states weigh stations are usually the only places I get checked, and even that isn't common. Most of the time they just green light me through. Since you're not commercial, you don't have to stop. I'd be surprised to hear you ever have a DOT encounter. Chain it down however you would like, either at all four corners or on each end. Just make sure it can't move around and you're set. The fact that you even know about chain ratings and how to use a chain puts you ahead of 90% of the private guys I see on the road!
Thanks, I think I'm just going to do the 2 chains. I'll really only be hauling it long distances twice a year and maybe shuffle it a couple miles a couple times a year and for that, I'm not to worried about being 100% by the books. I'm more worried about will it work than if Big Brother approves...

Not to get off the track of hauling heavy loads, but my neighbor and I both have single axle trailers, rated at less than 3000 pounds. When I haul my 445, I use a chain and binder front and rear. My neighbor loads his 2210 up tight to the headboard of the trailer, sets the parking brake and hits the road, with no tie downs at all.

Don
I don't know if I'd do that! Seems like a couple of straps would be some good insurance, I'm all for not spending a fortune on them, but I do want something!
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I just ordered some chain and binders off the web - with shipping it was still $50 cheaper than what I could find locally.

I decided to just go with the front and back set up instead of the 4 corners at least for now. If they want to be sticklers then I deserve it. I saved a couple bucks by buying a larger single strand of chain, and then plan on cutting it into the proper sections, so if I get a better look and want the 4 corners, I still have the option, I can always just buy some more hooks and binders.

Of course all my old balls/ball mounts were to light duty, so I had to buy new ones of them as well - this is killing me! Should finally be good for a safe haul though!
 
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I vote for ratchet style binders. I have the lever style. Many times I find the lever style too loose and when moving up one chain link too tight. With the ratchet style you should be just right. I only use one chain (5/16" grade 70) front and rear when hauling the JD 2030 (I don't have a big enough trailer or tow rig to haul the JD6415) I use a threaded clevis in the draw bar at the rear and swivel lift rings in the bolt holes for the front weight on the front. I have heard that implements need to be chained down too (bucket) I don't know about the hoe. No one mentioned it.
 

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According to the PennDOT Enforcement Officer, the backhoe bucket must be secured with chain also.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
If you want to check prices, i jst added a bunch of chain and chain binders to the tool store. General Tools>Transportation

Transportation
How long ago did you have them up? I looked on the store a week ago and I must have missed them. I already ordered them elsewhere, but it looks like your prices are pretty competitive with what I saw, wish I would have known earlier!
 
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