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Hi all at times I need to lift certain items with my loader hooks and I don’t want to mark them up with chains.

I’m trying to preserve their painted finish as much as possible

Any recommendations for a lifting slings or straps to achieve this ???
 

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Checkout site sponsor Ken's Bolt-On Hooks for slings, straps, D-rings, etc.

Ken's Bolt on Grab Hooks <<Accessories>>

I used one of these slings last winter to hoist my cabs when installing them on the 1025Rs. I had no issues with scratches or mars, but I did make sure the slings were clean first.
 

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Ken has some awesome slings with the rings to fit your loader hooks on them. He has several different lengths to choose from and a really good price on them. I have a few myself, very well built. Use that link above or google Kens Bolt On Hooks.
 
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Get yourself some nylon slings. Buy them in pairs. I prefer the endless ones over the ones with eyes.
 

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Chains are for pulling logs not lifting things, very few chains you buy and most people use are actually lifting chains most are rated at pulling force. I am an EPRI certified Master Rigger as one of my qualifications at work, we NEVER lift or rig with chains, ever.Get some quality nylon straps and you will be good to go. TSC or RK carry decent ones for the price, high quality stuff gets real expensive real quick.
 

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Ken has some awesome slings with the rings to fit your loader hooks on them. He has several different lengths to choose from and a really good price on them. I have a few myself, very well built. Use that link above or google Kens Bolt On Hooks.
Oblong rings rule :good2:
 

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Chains are for pulling logs not lifting things, very few chains you buy and most people use are actually lifting chains most are rated at pulling force. I am an EPRI certified Master Rigger as one of my qualifications at work, we NEVER lift or rig with chains, ever.Get some quality nylon straps and you will be good to go. TSC or RK carry decent ones for the price, high quality stuff gets real expensive real quick.
When you mentioned being a certified rigger it reminded me of this - a basic rigging handbook that I found very useful.

When I was an equipment operator instructor for the state we gave a primer on rigging to the Gradall and track hoe classes.

Anyone who is lifting anything should at least glance through the handbook.

http://www.greentractortalk.com/forums/greentractortalk-technical-library/30986-rigging-workbook.html
 

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I will admit to lifting with 5/16" grade 70 chain. I know not rated for lifting. :flag_of_truce:
I am thinking if I can find some old junk fire hose and cut into 2' lengths, they could be slid on the chain where protection is needed.
 

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I agree with ya Stan but keep in mind those ratings are "probably" for a vertical lift with the strap and not choked which we often do. Straps are all I use, a couple 4-6-8 & 12 footers.
Here's some good info when choosing a strap: https://www.mcmaster.com/#nylon-straps/=1bs4zdf
 

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I agree with ya Stan but keep in mind those ratings are "probably" for a vertical lift with the strap and not choked which we often do. Straps are all I use, a couple 4-6-8 & 12 footers.
Here's some good info when choosing a strap: https://www.mcmaster.com/#nylon-straps/=1bs4zdf
Kenny had posted a graphic once which showed the reduction of work load with the different hitches. That is what I was originally searching for when I found Randy’s rigging workbook.

The heaviest I lift is probably my mower deck which is 200#-250#. Whenever possible I put stuff on a pallet and use my forks.
 
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If you really want to know how to rig,call on Crosby Group.they have free courses all over the country.the amount of info they can provide is like taking a drink of water from a firehose.i learned more at their classes than ones I paid hundreds of dollars a day to attend.
 

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Deja Vu

I feel like I'm having major deja vu reading these last few posts. I feel like I read the exact same dialog months ago, but the time stamps on the replies says today (2018/03/01).
Good information here anyway. Learn something new all the time
 

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The three hitches used are Vertical (straight in-line), choker and basket. There are variations of the choker and basket called a double wrap choker and double wrap basket.

The sling baseline strength is based on the Vertical Hitch, which means the sling is used in line, it is not wrapped around the load to hitch it. Usually it is connected with a shackle.

A choker, or double wrap choker, hitch capacity is 75% of a vertical hitch with a wire rope sling and 80% of a vertical hitch with a chain or synthetic sling.

A basket, or double wrap basket, hitch capacity is 200% of the vertical hitch capacity.

All wire rope and synthetic slings are rated at a 5:1 safety factor. Chain sling capacities are rated at a 4:1 safety factor. This simply means, the capacity listed on the wire rope or synthetic sling tag is 1/5 of the load that it would take to break it. A chain tag rating is 1/4 of the load that would take to break it. This does not mean that you can overload them, it simply means that they are rated with lots of safety.

The only chain that is "legally" permitted to be used for "lifting" is grade 80 or grade 100. Grade 70 chain is truck tie down chain. Now, I'm not saying you shouldn't lift with grade 70 chain at home. At work, no!!!

A few pictures of different hitches.
 

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A little more concerning synthetic slings.

When using synthetics, sharp edges are what you have to watch for. Synthetics are as strong or stronger than steel but they are not very good with sharp edges.

So, if you are using synthetics over sharp edges, be sure to use softeners between the sling and edge, or use chain. Be careful with synthetics contacting bucket edges.

Also, if you are using synthetics with eyes, an object in the eye of a sling should not be wider than one-third the length of the eye. Larger than this can cause the stitching to be over stressed causing the eye to tear open.

:bigthumb:
 
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Yes you have basic hitches that reduce ratings, then you have sling angle calculations which reduce that even more. Just use a little common sense with lifting for the type of tractors most have on here and you will be fine.
 
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I too am rigging qualified , I'm a Millwright by trade. Rigging is a big part of my job. Its ok to use chain. It along with any other type of sling or lifting device must have a tag on it stating the capacity. Most of those hooks we all have on our loaders aren't legal for lifting. But what one can get away wit at home, or small farm is very different than the work place. Even at work some contractors do things very differently than others .
 

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I too am rigging qualified , I'm a Millwright by trade. Rigging is a big part of my job. Its ok to use chain. It along with any other type of sling or lifting device must have a tag on it stating the capacity. Most of those hooks we all have on our loaders aren't legal for lifting. But what one can get away wit at home, or small farm is very different than the work place. Even at work some contractors do things very differently than others .
Yep, big difference between home and farm use and work use. :good2:
 
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